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WWU / Fairhaven College of Interdiscipinary Studies

Fall 2012 Courses: 400 Level

43368 | 403A Advanced Seminar

Tuxill (4 credits)

 

Materials fee: $15.11

Prereqs: Override required.

Required by all Fairhaven students. Senior status. Must be taken in final quarter at Western.

Note: Student must have applied for graduation for Fall quarter in order to register.

 

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life"

 

This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education.

 

Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

 

Texts: Varies by section

 

Credit/Evaluation: Active, informed participation in class discussion and excellent class attendance; supportive collaboration with your classmates in the writing process; timely completion of assignments; a final presentation of significant aspects of your educational experience; and a final draft of your Summary and Evaluation, approved and signed by your concentration chair (or by your advisor for majors or upside-down students.).

 

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43339 | 403A Advanced Seminar

Conton(4 credits)

 

Materials fee: $15.11

Prereqs: Override required.

Required by all Fairhaven students. Senior status. Must be taken in final quarter at Western.

Note: Student must have applied for graduation for Fall quarter in order to register.

 

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life"

 

This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education.

 

Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

 

Texts: Varies by section

 

Credit/Evaluation: Active, informed participation in class discussion and excellent class attendance; supportive collaboration with your classmates in the writing process; timely completion of assignments; a final presentation of significant aspects of your educational experience; and a final draft of your Summary and Evaluation, approved and signed by your concentration chair (or by your advisor for majors or upside-down students.).

 

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43343 | 412e Advanced Topics in the Law: Criminal Law

Helling (4 credits)

 

Prerequisite: Fair 201a, Fair 203a, Fair 211b or permission of instructor.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE UPPER-DIVISION SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

This is a study of substantive American criminal law using a law school casebook. Topics include the theories of punishment and rehabilitation, intent, and defenses such as insanity and self-defense. We will compare the common law and Model Penal Code versions of criminal law by looking at case studies of specific crimes.

 

Texts: Joshua Dressler, CASES AND MATERIALS ON CRIMINAL LAW (5th edition); Paul H. Robinson, CRIMINAL LAW CASE STUDIES (4th edition).

 

*Please note: bought new, these books are VERY expensive (together about $200). You might try half.com or similar sites for a better bargain.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Rigorous reading load, averaging 30 dense pages per class. Regular and punctual attendance required and students will be expected to come to class having read and briefed the legal cases. Weekly case briefs from the criminal law case studies book, and three papers of 4-6 pages of more extended case analysis required. (A mock law exam at the end of the quarter is possible).

 

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43340| 413e Curers, Clients and Culture: Health and Illness

Conton (5 credits)

 

Materials fee: $13.70

Prerequisite: cross-cultural study or instructor permission

THIS COURSE MEETS THE UPPER-DIVISION SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

Well-being is a concern in all societies. Health, as a category, includes a wide variety of practices, attitudes, and beliefs held by different people. Examination of health belief systems in cross-cultural perspective familiarizes students with modes of explaining and treating illness in a wide variety of cultures, including our own. We will discuss the roles of healer and client, sorcery and witchcraft, diagnosis and divination, treatment strategies, birth practices, and the impact of westernization on non-western medical systems in various cultural contexts. We will also consider the delivery of appropriate health care for ethnic minorities in the United States.

 

Texts: HEALING MAKES OUR HEARTS HAPPY, Richard Katz; THE SPIRIT CATCHES YOU AND YOU FALL DOWN, Anne Fadiman; and a manual of selected readings to be purchased at the WWU Bookstore.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, familiarity with the assigned readings and informed participation in and facilitation of class discussion, two learning assessments, as well as an individual or collaborative project which may take the form of an academic journal, research paper, field investigation or book reviews that will be presented to the class. Class work will demonstrate a cross-cultural understanding of the structure and dynamics of health-related behavior, and awareness of the socio-cultural components of one's own health belief system.

 

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