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WWU / Fairhaven College of Interdiscipinary Studies

Summer 2012 Courses: 100-200 Level

| 200 Directed Independent Study (variable credits)

 

Beginning level independent study project. Typically, an independent study at this level is the student's first exploration of this topic or content area. With the guidance of a faculty sponsor, the student developed a proposal identifying learning objectives related to the specific topic area. The proposal also described the resources necessary to complete the study and the criteria for demonstration and evaluation of learning. Students propose and register individually for the Independent Study through Web4U. Additional documentation about the specifics of this project are available online at http://www.wwu.edu/fairhaven/academics/isp/isp_instructions.shtml


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30491 | 201a Critical and Reflective Inquiry

Tag (5 credits)

 

Prerequisite: Admission to Fairhaven College: required of all new students in their first quarter of enrollment at Fairhaven.

 

Animal
You will know
when you walk
in bear country.
By the silence
flowing swiftly between juniper trees
by the sundown colors of sandrock
all around you.
-Leslie Marmon Silko

This class is an invitation to walk in bear country. Or, as poet Denise Levertov put it, to "Come into animal presence." We will explore what it means, as humans, to be animals, and how we imagine, understand, use, encounter, and live with nonhuman animals. At the core of our explorations will be a series of questions that we develop, write down, talk about, examine, and share. Think about all the ways in which your life intersects with and depends upon other creatures: worms making compost, bees pollinating crops, salmon frying on your grill, ravens calling down through the trees as you walk below, a cat rubbing against your leg. What rights do such animals have? How do they think, communicate, survive? What are the limitations or possibilities for what we can know about animals beyond ourselves? To what extent are our own actions, beliefs, senses, and being shaped by our animalness?

 

To explore such questions we will read stories, articles, essays, and poems, write reflections, autobiographical narratives, and research essays, and spend lots of time talking, asking questions, and thinking critically. We will consider the ways in which scientists, writers, artists, wildlife managers, veterinarians, ranchers, vegetarians, musicians, and storytellers speak about animals and their own animalness. Animals will be at the center of everything we do and say and explore, even the very modern and ancient idea that we, too, are animals, and what that means for our actual relationships to the wild and domestic creatures with whom we share this planet. This will be a reflective, thought-provoking, and creative class. Please bring stories of your own animal encounters and a willingness to collectively investigate, illuminate, and listen to the many and varied stories of animal presence.

 

Texts: NEVER CRY WOLF by Mowat; INTIMATE NATURE: THE BOND BETWEEN WOMEN AND ANIMALS ed. by Hogan; FALCON by Macdonald; A POCKET STYLE MANUAL (5th ed.) by Hacker

 

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance. Active participation in class discussions, presentations, writing workshops, and other activities. Completion and quality of coursework: several short reflective and analytical essays, an Autobiographical Narrative, a Research Essay, a Writing Plan, and a Book of Questions.

 

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31308 | 270h Audio Recording I

Fish (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $74.00


NOTE: This course was formally 275h. Students who received credit for 275h may not take 270h for credit.

 

Audio Recording Techniques I explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course follows the recording process starting with the tracking session, then the overdub session, and through the mix-down session. By examining the various pieces of the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), multi-track recorders (analog and digital), patchbays, signal and effect processors, headphone systems, and multi-track punching and bouncing. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a "hands-on" manner. A detailed manual will be provided to each student so that each concept will be encountered first in an assigned reading, then in lab, and finally in the class meetings. All time spent in the studio will be documented in the lab manual in a journal entry fashion.

Texts: THE RECORDING ENGINEER'S HANDBOOK (2nd edition) by Owsinski

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a written and "hands-on" assessment.

 

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