News & Events


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Julienne Gage, traditional producer and multimedia journalist, at the World Issues Forum

"Water Everlasting?"

April 30, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

"Water Everlasting?" looks at the management of Haiti's most essential resource in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. That topic opens a broader dialogue about development in the Western Hemisphere's poorest country. Can Haiti ever recover? Where do those billions of dollars in international aid money go? What will it take to get Haiti moving toward a more sustainable future? Rather than make a typical PR video highlighting just the successful parts of a project, Julienne and her crew opted to explore the complexities of a work in progress.


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear James Pirtle, Seattle trial lawyer, at the World Issues Forum

james pirtle

"Traditional Justice as an Alternative for Child Soldiers" 

April 16, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

The presentation entails the tragic story of Thomas Kwoyelo, former child soldier turned Commander in the Lord's Resistance Army in Uganda.  He is the first combatant to be slated for trial in the new International Crimes Division of the High Court of Uganda.  Kwoyelo's defense team won his case on appeal on equal protection grounds (though the government has refused to release him).  We will discuss the status of this case, moral culpability, the plight of the child soldier, and the lasting consequences on the accused, the state, and the victims of rebellion.


Spring Powwow

Wade King Recreation Center
April 25 & 26, 2014

wwu spring powwow

Please contact petrosd@students.wwu.edu if you are interested in volunteering for this event.


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Max Blumenthal at the World Issues Forum

"Goliath: Living and Loathing in Israel”

April 9, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

In Goliath, New York Times bestselling author Max Blumenthal takes us on a journey through the badlands and high roads of Israel-Palestine, painting a startling portrait of Israeli society under the siege of increasingly authoritarian politics as the occupation of the Palestinians deepens.


Women Studies Colloquium: "Whose Sexual Expression Is It Anyway?: The Legal Regulation of Sex Work versus the Agency of Sex Workers"

Monday April 21st, 2014
4pm - CF 120

Dr. Carisa Showden, Assistant Professor of Political Science, UNC, Greensboro In her lecture, Dr. Showden will assess and critique the judicial and regulatory knot of U.S. laws regarding three forms of sex work: prostitution, pornography, and exotic dancing. Her talk examines how legal discourse and practice both produce and sustain particular views of normative sexuality, gender hierarchy, and women's agency. Profesor Showden's teaching and research areas focus on: feminist theory, theoretical and cultural constructions of agency, domestic violence, democratic theory, women and politics, modern political thought, and post-structuralism. She is the author of Choices Women Make: Agency in Domestic Violence, Assisted Reproduction, and Sex Work (University of Minnesota, 2011).


Women Studies Colloquium: "I Feel For You"

Tuesday April 8th, 2014
3pm - CF 110

Dr. Dian Million, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of Washington Dian Million (Tanana Athabascan) is Associate Professor in American Indian Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. She received her B.A. in interdisciplinary studies from Fairhaven College at Western Washington University in 1995. She earned her Masters and Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from the University of California at Berkeley in 2004. Her research explores the politics of mental and physical health, with attention to affect in intersection with race, class, and gender in Indian Country. She is the author of Therapeutic Nations: Healing in an Age of Indigenous Human Rights (University of Arizona Press, 2013), a discussion of the pros and cons of trauma as a political discourse in the struggle for Indigenous self-determination in an era of global neoliberalism.


Thesis Defense: Jami Wright

Thursday, March 20, 2014
12pm, Arntzen Hall 319

jamie wright thesis defense


Call for Undergraduate Anthropology Papers

The Journal of Undergraduate Anthropology
Deadline: April 1st

The Undergraduate Anthropology Association of Binghamton University is pleased to announce that it is now accepting submissions for Issue 4 of the Journal of Undergraduate Anthropology.

This is a unique opportunity for undergraduate students to publish their academic work in a peer-edited scholarly journal. We are accepting original anthropological research papers, essays (about study abroad, field school, or international internship experiences), honors theses, and photographs.

For more details about submission guidelines and to read past issues of the Journal, visit our website: http://anthrojournal.binghamton.edu/.

Any questions can be sent to uao@binghamtonsa.org.

The deadline for submission is April 1st.


Undergraduate Research Awards

WWU Wilson Library
Deadline: April 15th

Wilson Library is granting three $500 awards to undergraduate students who demonstrate excellence in research using Library resources to write their research papers.

Dean Greenberg arranged with Western Foundation to fund three awards of $500 each. The student research papers can be from any discipline as long as they write the papers for a credit course at Western.

The deadline for submitting papers is April 15, 2014 and the deadline for the committee's decisions on the awards will be May 15, 2014.

Here is a link to our Lib-Guide about the application process and deadlines. http://libguides.wwu.edu/aecontent.php?pid=359366


Scholarship Opportunities for Undergraduate Students

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHSS) is pleased to announce that we have several scholarship opportunities available to students from departments and programs within the College

The CHSS Advancement Council Scholarship and the CHSS Alumni Leadership Scholarships are awarded to students majoring in the humanities or social/behavioral sciences to promote the value of a public liberal arts education, the importance of developing an interdisciplinary education, and community engagement.

TheElyse C. Alper Scholarship for International Studies provides an annual award to promote and further international understanding and goodwill through study at a recognized university outside the United States.

Students who plan on participating in an internship during the 2014-2015 academic year are encouraged to apply for the Mike Sharar Internship Scholarship, which was established to provide financial support for a student to expand her/his education through a formal internship.

To be eligible for one of these awards students must be:

  • A declared undergraduate in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Enrolled as a full-time student
  • Have at least three quarters of coursework remaining as of the beginning of Fall quarter 2014
  • Meet other criteria unique to the scholarship, as described on the CHSS website.
Scholarship applications must be received by Friday, April 11, 2014.

For more information visit https://chss.wwu.edu/scholarship-opportunities or contact Kim Ayre by email to KimKolb.Ayre@wwu.edu or phone 360.650.3763.


The Burke Museum Archaeology Department is now accepting proposals for the Burke Museum Archaeology Research Collections Fellowship (BMACRF)

The fellowship provides a stipend for students (graduate or undergraduate) to conduct summer research on Burke archaeological collections. This is a great opportunity for students to get research experience with archaeological collections.

Students with backgrounds other than archaeology are invited to apply, but the intended research should include an archaeological collections component.

The call for proposals is attached, and more information regarding the fellowship can be found here: http://www.burkemuseum.org/archaeology/bmarcf/

Information on Burke Archaeology Collections can be found here: http://www.burkemuseum.org/archaeology/locator

Deadline for proposals is May 15, 2014

Recipients will be notified of their award by May 30, 2014. For additional information, please contact Dr. Peter Lape, Curator of Archaeology at plape@uw.edu


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Winona LaDuke at the World Issues Forum

“The Next Energy Economy: Moving Forward with Grassroots Strategies to Mitigate Global Climate Change”

March 5th, 12-1:20pm
Viking Union Multi-Purpose Room

Winona LaDuke, (Anishinaabe), is an internationally acclaimed author, orator and activist protecting the lands and life ways of Native communities. LaDuke is founder and Co-Director of Honor the Earth, a national advocacy group encouraging public support and funding for native environmental groups. With Honor the Earth, she works nationally and internationally on issues of climate change, renewable energy, sustainable development, food systems and environmental justice.

In her own community in northern Minnesota, she is the founder of the White Earth Land Recovery Project, one of the largest reservation based non-profit organizations in the country, and a leader on the issues of culturally-based sustainable development strategies, renewable energy and food systems. In this work, LaDuke also works to protect Indigenous plants and heritage foods from patenting and genetic engineering.

In 1994, Time magazine named her one of America’s fifty most promising leaders under forty years of age, and in 1997 LaDuke was named Ms. Magazine Woman of the Year. Other honors include the Reebok Human Rights Award, the Thomas Merton Award, the Ann Bancroft Award, the Global Green Award, and the prestigious International Slow Food Award for working to protect wild rice and local biodiversity. In 2007, LaDuke was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame. LaDuke also served as Ralph Nader’s vice-presidential running mate on the Green Party ticket in the 1996 and 2000 presidential elections.

In addition to numerous articles, LaDuke is the author of a number of non-fiction titles including All Our Relations, The Winona LaDuke Reader, Recovering the Sacred: the Power of Naming and Claiming, Food is Medicine: Recovering Traditional Foods to Heal the People and her latest, The Militarization of Indian Country. She has also penned a work of fiction, Last Standing Woman, and a children's book, In the Sugarbush.

Outspoken, engaging, and unflaggingly dedicated to matters of ecological sustainability, Winona LaDuke is a powerful speaker who inspires her audiences to action and engagement.


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Christian Parenti at the World Issues Forum

“Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence”

February 26, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

Christian Parenti is a professor at the School for International Training Graduate Institute, SIT; Director, Climate Change, Food, Water, and Energy Program, IHP.

Drawing on his recent book Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (2011) and recent travels in the Global South, Christian Parenti will discuss the intersection between war and climate change and what can be done about it.


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Kathleen Dean Moore at the World Issues Forum

“RED SKY AT MORNING: Ethics and the Climate Crisis”

February 19, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

Kathleen Dean Moore is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Oregon State University, Director of the Spring Creek Project of Ideas, Nature and the Written Word.

Global warming and the souring of the seas are real and dangerous threats to all ecosystems and the people who depend on them. This is a scientific and political issue, but it is fundamentally a moral issue and it calls for a moral response. Come hear author and activist Kathleen Dean Moore speak about our responsibility to take urgent action. What must be done? What can we do?


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Nancy Lord at the World Issues Forum

“Climate Change and Human Rights: Lessons from Alaska”

February 12, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

Nancy Lord is an author and former Alaska State Writer Laureate

Lord will present ways in which Alaska Native populations, with long histories of resilience and adaptability, are challenged by climate change that threatens their abilities to live on ancestral lands and gather traditional foods. She'll share examples of their strategies for coping with environmental change and suggest what we might learn and do as good global citizens

In conjunction with Western Reads, Lord will present ways in which Alaska Native populations, with long histories of resilience and adaptability, are challenged by climate change that threatens their abilities to live on ancestral lands and gather traditional foods. She¹ll share examples of their strategies for coping with environmental change and suggest what we might learn and do as good global citizens.


Tonight I will be giving a travelogue about Ladakh at the Whatcom Museum, drawing on our group’s experience from last summer. If any of you are free, it would be great to see you there!

Travelogue with James Loucky and Charlie Ashbaugh:
"Water and Well Being Himalayan Harbinger of a Changing Planet"
February 6th 2014
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Whatcom Museum Old City Hall
121 Prospect Street Bellingham WA

Ladakh, in northern India, is setting for some of the highest inhabited mountains and valleys on earth, where people have adapted to harsh conditions through remarkable water management, combination of cultivation and animal husbandry, and social norms of interdependence and ecocultural understanding. Our recent opportunities for travel and study in Ladakh provided remarkable images and accounts of stunning vistas, wild rivers of the Indus watershed, and gatherings of Buddhist villagers as well as nomads. In turn, we discovered that we have much to learn from Ladakh - particularly about how we also may respond resourcefully as tougher conditions emerge worldwide


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear David Battisti at the World Issues Forum

"Global Food Production and Climate Change”

February 5, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

David Battisti, Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, and Tamaki Endowed Chair, UW

By the end of the century, the season averaged growing temperature will very likely exceed the highest temperature ever recorded throughout the tropics and subtropics. By 2050, the increase in temperature alone will cause a 20% reduction in the yield of all of the major grains (maize, rice, wheat and soybeans). The breadbasket countries in the midlatitudes will experience marked increases in year-to-year volatility in crop production. Increasing stresses on the major crops due to climate change, coupled with the increasing demand for food due to increasing population and development, present significant challenges to achieving global food security.


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Robert V. Percival at the World Issues Forum

“The Global Environmental Challenge of China"

January 29, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

Robert V. Percival is the Robert F. Stanton Professor of Law and the Director of the Environmental Law Program at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law.

"China’s rapid development has come at a staggering cost to the environment. More than 1.2 million Chinese die each year from exposure to air pollution, which at times has been so bad as to shut down economic activity in major Chinese cities. As the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases, China now has more impact on the health of the planet than any other country, giving everyone a stake in efforts to combat Chinese pollution. This lecture will explore why the enactment of extensive bodies of environmental law has not been enough to turn the tide in China and the prospects for overcoming this immense challenge to the world’s environment."


Call for Conference Volunteers

We are looking for undergraduate and graduate student volunteers to assist with NWAC conference preparation in the weeks before the conference (you must be local), and room monitoring, registration management, poster support, etc. during the conference.

If you volunteer 5 hours of time, we will waive your registration fee. There are a limited number of volunteer slots, so please contact Rachael Kannegaard at nwac@wwu.edu to commit to volunteering as soon as possible. Thank you!


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Princess Daazhraii Johnson at the World Issues Forum

“Protecting the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge”

January 22, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

Princess Daazhraii Johnson is the Executive Director of the Gwich'in Steering Committee, one of the oldest Indigenous non-profit groups in Alaska.

"The Gwich'in Nation has been working at protecting the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge now for over 30 years. The birthing & nursing grounds of the Porcupine Caribou Herd, for which Gwich'in villages throughout Alaska and Canada depend upon, is located on the Coastal Plain sometimes referred to the 1002 Area which continues to be the target for oil & gas development. In addition to this immediate threat, Alaska is also at the forefront of Climate Change. Mrs. Johnson will discuss the grassroots efforts of the Gwich'in to protect their way of life and how they have been able to sustain these efforts over the years."


The Balkan Heritage Field School 2014

The Balkan Heritage Field School (BHFS) has just opened the application session for the next field school season in 2014. Every year the Balkan Heritage Field School (BHFS) offers up to 15 projects/courses in the field of Archeology and History of South-Eastern Europe, Documentation, Conservation and Restoration of Historic Artifacts and Monuments – all of them are affiliated with ongoing excavation, heritage conservation and documentation projects and listed among the academic courses of New Bulgarian University, Bulgaria (so all participants can obtain academic credits upon request).

Since 2003 the BHFS has implemented 52 field school projects attended by more than 900 students from 48 countries. Project countries: Bulgaria, Macedonia. Projects’ language: English. Historical periods in focus of the BHFS projects: Early and Middle Balkan Neolithic (6000-5400 BC); Balkan Chalcolithic (5000 - 4000 BC), Archaic Greek (seventh-sixth century BC), Classical Greek (fifth to fourth century BC), Classical Thracian (fifth to fourth century BC), Hellenistic (fourth to first century BC), Roman (first to fourth century AD), Early Byzantine (fourth to sixth century AD), Early Medieval and Late Migration Period (seventh to ninth century AD) and Late Medieval (fourteenth to seventeenth century AD).

The BHFS projects in 2014 are listed here.


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Jack Herring at the World Issues Forum

“The Science of Climate Change: A Settled Matter?”

January 15, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

Jack Herring, Dean of Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, WWU

"Understanding the human impact on the Earth’s climate is one of the most pressing and complex scientific questions of this time. While our understanding of climate dynamics is improving, those opposing immediate action on climate change often point to scientific uncertainty to bolster their arguments. In some cases, the science is largely settled, but many key climate feedback mechanisms are poorly understood. This leaves global humanity with immense ethical questions about how to decide what risk of climate change is tolerable and who will bear the brunt of preventing the change or adapting to it."


National Park Service’s 2014 Archaeological Prospection Workshop

The National Park Service’s 2014 workshop on archaeological prospection techniques entitled Current Archaeological Prospection Advances for Non-Destructive Investigations in the 21 Century will be held May 19-23, 2014, at Aztalan State Park in Jefferson County, Wisconsin. 

Lodging and lectures will be at the Comfort Suites in Johnson Creek, Wisconsin.  The field exercises will take place at Aztalan State Park.  Aztalan State Park is a National Historic Landmark and contains one of Wisconsin's most important archaeological sites.  It showcases an ancient Middle-Mississippian village that thrived between A.D. 1000 and 1300.The people who settled Aztalan built large, flat-topped pyramidal mounds and a stockade around their village.  Portions of the stockade and two mounds have been reconstructed in the park.

Co-sponsors for the workshop include the National Park Service’s Midwest Archaeological Center, the Aztalan State Park, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

This will be the twenty-fourth year of the workshop dedicated to the use of geophysical, aerial photography, and other remote sensing methods as they apply to the identification, evaluation, conservation, and protection of archaeological resources across this Nation.  The workshop will present lectures on the theory of operation, methodology, processing, and interpretation with on-hands use of the equipment in the field.

There is a registration charge of $475.00.  Application forms are available on the Midwest Archeological Center’s web page at http://www.cr.nps.gov/mwac/.

For further information, please contact Steven L. DeVore, Archeologist, National Park Service, Midwest Archeological Center, Federal Building, Room 474, 100 Centennial Mall North, Lincoln, Nebraska 68508-3873: tel: (402) 437-5392, ext. 141; fax: (402) 437-5098; email: steve_de_vore@nps.gov.


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Jeremiah "Jay" Julius at the World Issues Forum

“Kwel Hoy: We Draw the Line”

November 20, 12-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

Jeremiah “Jay” Julius, Member of Lummi Nation Tribal Council and Fisherman

"Xwe’chi’eXen (Cherry Point) is a sacred landscape in NW Washington that has deep spiritual and cultural significance to the people of the Lummi Nation. Overlooking the world-famous San Juan Islands, it includes ancient reef-net sites and a 3,500 year-old village site. The Hereditary Chief of the Lummi Nation, tsilixw (Bill James), describes it as the “home of the Ancient Ones.” Coal interests plan to construct North America's largest coal export terminal on this site. Jay Julius will address the impacts a proposed coal terminal would have on the environment, treaty fishing rights and spiritual values; and share the Lummi response of a Totem Pole Journey to raise awareness and opposition to a coal terminal."


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Hedrick Smith at the World Issues Forum

“Who Stole the American Dream?”

November 19, 2pm-3:30pm
Frasier Hall 2

Hedrick Smith, Pulitzer Prize-winning former New York Times reporter and editor and Emmy Award-winning producer / correspondent

"Speaking about his current best-selling book, "WHO Stole the American Dream?, Hedrick Smith will describe how America moved from an era of widely shared power and effective bipartisan politics in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, to today's polarized politics, starkly unequal democracy, gaping financial inequalities, with a middle class and a national economy – stuck in a rut. Smith breaks with the conventional explanation that the demise of America’s middle class was caused solely by market forces, globalization and new technologies. He sees a political power shift in Washington and wedge economics in the private sector as the main causes, and he lays out an agenda for systemic reforms and political changes based on a revival of grass roots civic activism.”


Attending the AAA meetings in Chicago? Be sure to join us:

Patsa Puqun: 10,000 years of Adaptation and Mitigation of Environmental Changes in the Andes

Wed. Nov. 20th 1pm

The Inextricability of Environment and Culture in the Emergence of 21st Century Maladies: Potential Contributions of Anthropology

Fri. Nov. 22nd  1:45pm

Center for Social Well Being: November 30th Application Deadline

CLIMATE & CULTURE CHANGE IN THE ANDES
December 27th, 2013 - January 15th, 2014

The Center for Social Well Being celebrates 13 years offering our 3 week training program in interdisciplinary qualitative field methods, as well as Spanish and Quechua language classes, in the Peruvian Andes. The combined undergraduate and graduate level seminar is held at the center's rural base, an adobe lodge on an ecological ranch in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range of the Callejón de Huaylas, 7 hours northeast of Lima. Coursework provides in-depth orientation to theory and practice in field investigation that emphasizes methods in Participatory Action Research and Andean Ethnography centered on themes of Climate Change with respect to Ecology, Health, Education, Community Organization and related topics. Students have the opportunity to actively engage in ongoing investigations in local agricultural communities to develop effective field research techniques, and to acquire language skills. In addition, the program provides excursions to museums, archaeological sites, glacial lakes and hotsprings; optional recreational activities include hiking, mountain biking, rafting, kayaking, rock climbing and trekking. The program tuition fee is $4,000 US dollars which includes all in-country travel, food and accommodations at the rural center, course materials, classes and field activities. The program is under the direction of Applied Medical Anthropologist, Patricia J. Hammer, Ph.D., as well as Ecologist and Field Coordinator, Flor de María Barreto Tosi.

For an application: phammer@wayna.rcp.net.pe
For further program details: www.socialwellbeing.org

Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Jose Antonio Lucero at the World Issues Forum

“Our Harsh Logic: Israeli Soldiers’ Testimonies from the Occupied Territories”

November 13, Noon-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

Yehuda Shaul, Executive director of Breaking the Silence, one of Israel’s internationally lauded NGOs

"Our story is how an ordinary good boy encounters the circumstances in Hebron and what he does there. Wanting people to understand what the occupation is beyond newspaper headlines, we want to reflect it through a soldier's eyes: how your senses are gradually dulled, how you cross red lines, what the moral cost is. The soldiers in OUR HARSH LOGIC have gone on the record with their personal experiences to break what they call a conspiracy of silence across Israeli society and to fulfill a moral obligation. Speaking with undeniable authority, they have made a supremely significant contribution to one of the world’s most vexed and intractable conflicts."


$10,000 Study in Canada Scholarships for 2014-15

  • $10,000 tuition full year
  • $5,000 tuition one semester/term
  • $500 health insurance allowance
  • $800 in-country travel allowance
  • 3 day Ottawa orientation
  • 3 day Washington DC seminar

Application Deadline: January 31, 2014
Contact: Killam Fellowships

The Canadian-US Fulbright Program is offering up to 20 scholarships for American undergraduates to experience their "Study Abroad" at any Canadian university while studying in any discipline or program during the 2014-15 academic year.

Students selected and choosing to spend a year will be awarded $10,000 while those opting for onne term/semester will be awarded $5,000. Successful applicants will also visit Ottawa at the beginning and Washington DC at the conclusion of their program.

Additional details are contained in the atached flyer which we invite you to share with colleagues, faculty and students.


fitzpatrick talk

Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Jose Antonio Lucero at the World Issues Forum

"Frictions of Conversion and Contention: Religion and Activism in the Tohono O’odham Borderlands”

November 6, Noon-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

Jose Antonio Lucero, Hanauer Honors Professor, Associate Professor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Chair, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, University of Washington

“Due to US border policies that funnel migrants through the harsh Arizona desert, thousands of people have crossed and died on Tohono O’odham lands. Mike Wilson, a tribal member and activist, leaves water in the desert for migrants, against the wishes of his tribal council and the United States Border Patrol. To the surprise of many, in the 1980s Wilson was a member of the US Army Special Forces stationed in El Salvador. How did a Green Beret become an outspoken human rights activist? Professor Lucero argues that religion provided the “friction” that both enabled and constrained his activism.”


Crossing Borders - A film by Arnd Wachter

November 12, 2013 :: Frasier Hall 4, 6pm

“Crossing Borders” is a documentary that follows four Moroccan and four American university students as they travel together through Morocco and, in the process of discovering “The Other.” discover themselves. Humor, honesty and a willingness to be challenged all bring individuals closer to each other and the relationships that develop disarm hidden stereotypes.

film event: crossing borders


"Have fun finding a job with that degree..."

What to do with your Anthropology Degree after Leaving Western

Graduate Student Panel
November 13, 2013 :: AH 319, 4:30pm

Professor Panel
November 14, 2013 :: AH 219, 6pm

Have you ever wondered what to do with your anthropology degree once you've left Western? Have you ever been told "have fun finding a job with that degree." Anthropology Club has a couple of great panels coming up that will help answer that question, and put that comment to rest.

Join us on November 13th at 4:30 in Arntzen 319 for our Graduate Student Panel, where you can ask questions and get answers about schooling after getting your degree.

If grad school isn't in your plans, then join us the next day at 6:00PM in Arntzen 219 for our professor panel. Here you can ask professors from each of the focuses what you can do with your degree once you leave Western.

Come with questions and concerns about job hunting, resume writing, personalizing your degree, CVAs, and anything else. Feel free to bring friends.

Looking forward to seeing you there!


usf education abroad 1


usf education abroad 2


OPERATION GROUNDSWELL:
BACKPACKING WITH A PURPOSE

Operation Groundswell is looking for students who want to get out of the classroom and into the world for some hands-on learning and meaningful volunteer experience. Join us this winter in Guatemala where we will:

  • Go off the grid on a journey up into the remote village of Rio Negro, site of an infamous massacre in the early 1980s
  • Experience Mayan culture first-hand by living and working collaboratively on a community-requested project with indigenous families
  • Visit the notorious Pavon Prison to learn about the ongoing fight for justice that continues decades after Guatemala’s civil war
  • Raft on the shores of the Lanquin and Cahabon Rivers and swim in the natural turquoise and pristine waters of Semuc Champey


If you're into cultural exchange, fulfilling community service, and off-the-beaten path adventure, apply for our Guatemala Winter Break program before December 9th!

Can’t travel this winter or want to travel elsewhere? We also have a number of programs in the spring and summer all around the world! 

Check out our map of where we go. 
www.operationgroundswell.com


operation groundswell backpacking with a purpose
NASU Flyer

Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Martin Bunton at the World Issues Forum

“A History of Partition: the Gordian Knot of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict"

October 30, Noon-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

"Over the last 120 years the evolving Palestinian–Israeli conflict has had many facets, but none has been as pressing and tangible as the problem of sharing the land. This presentation focuses squarely on the constant but evolving challenge of partitioning a relatively small but geographically varied strip of land sitting between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River. Organized chronologically, it reflects on the failure of successive attempts to establish separate independent states that can satisfy the claims of both Jewish and Palestinian nationalism to the same territorial space.”

Martin Bunton teaches history at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. The bulk of my teaching has been in the field of modern Middle Eastern history, and I am especially interested in studying the history of the region in its global context. My first book focused on the making and remaking of colonial land policies in Palestine during the interwar period. The book is organized around two main themes: the legacy of Ottoman administrative practices and the borrowing of policies developed elsewhere in the British Empire. These same themes also frame my organization of the nine-volume collection of primary sources on land legislation in Palestine. My current research explores the development of land policies in Egypt during the period of British rule, 1882-1920, with a focus on land taxation, cadastral surveys, state lands, and agricultural credit.


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Ebenezer Obadare at the World Issues Forum

"Paper Truths and Ersatz Lives: Authenticity and Fakery in an African Transnational Visa Economy”

October 23, Noon-1:20pm
Fairhaven College Auditorium

“The subject of my presentation is the Nigerian transnational visa economy. This is the motley of practices, private and institutional actors, institutions and state and para-state agents involved in the production of alternative/official travel documentation for clients who hail from Nigeria. As a contribution to the scholarship on ‘globalization from below’, I demonstrate how those who work within this economy become participants in the transnational process by producing agents who eventually become transnational migrants. Furthermore, I situate the workings of the visa economy within a larger economy of falsification. I argue that the ‘visa economy’ is a fallout of a combination of factors: the dis-embedding of the state from ordinary people’s lives, the freeze in social mobility as a result of mass unemployment, and the ‘appetite for Elsewhere’ partly fostered by the scarcity of opportunities for material reproduction and professional enhancement.”

Ebenezer Obadare is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA. He earned his doctorate in Social Policy from the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2005, and has undergraduate and graduate degrees in History (1989) and International Relations (1992) respectively from the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. A former award-winning journalist, Dr. Obadare’s research interests include: civil society and the state, religion and politics in Africa, civic service, and the politics of citizenship. He has published extensively on these subjects in leading refereed journals, among them Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE), African Affairs, Politique Africaine, Journal of Civil Society, Democratization, Patterns of Prejudice, Africa Development, Critical African Studies, Development in Practice, Journal of Modern African Studies, and Journal of Contemporary African Studies. He is the author of Africa Between the Old and the New: The Strange Persistence of the Postcolonial State ( UNCW, 2008); Statism, Youth and the Civic Imagination: A Critical Study of the Nigerian National Youth Service Corps(CODESRIA, 2010); editor of The Handbook of Civil Society in Africa (Springer, 2013); and co-editor of Encountering the Nigerian State (Palgrave, 2010) Nigeria at Fifty: The Nation in Narration (Routledge, 2011); Democracy and Prebendalism in Nigeria: Critical Interpretations (Palgrave, 2013); and Civic Agency in Africa: Arts of Resistance in the 21st Century (2014). He is a member of the editorial board of Journal of Civil Society and Contemporary Sociology.


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Jakatae Jayo at the World Issues Forum.

"Economic adaptation, identity preservation - a Lahu Na Shehleh case"

October 16, Noon-1:20pm,
Fairhaven College Auditorium

The Lahu Shehleh have faced serious challenges to their identity and way of life in recent decades. Jakatae Jayo will discuss the challenges of adapting to meet the demands of political and economic policies which restrict traditional practices. This talk will include discussion of grassroots efforts to develop sustainable economic programs, and to promote and maintain Lahu Shehleh ethnic identity, focusing on projects in which Mr. Jayo has been engaged over the past two decades.

Jakatae Jayo was born near the Thai-Burma border and now lives with his family in Huay Nam Rin in northern Thailand. Jakatae finished elementary school and began farming shortly after. Ten years ago he was hired by the Thai Research Fund to collect data on Lahu musical instruments. This inspired him to make his first documentary film “Lahu Shelah, Rhythm of Life.” Shortly after, Jakatae completed a second documentary, “Past in the Present”, to mark the opening of a Lahu Market near his village. He presented this film as a gift to the King of Thailand on his 80th birthday. Jakatae then went to work at the Mirror Art Foundation documenting various highland cultures through film, video and photos. Five years ago, he returned to work at Suan Lahu, an organic coffee farm near his village. Soon after, he made a third film, “Images Returning Home”, which documents the return from Germany to Thailand of archival photos of highland cultures. These photos were placed in the Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Anthropology Centre and prints were presented to the villages where they were originally taken. These days Jakatae helps to manage Suan Lahu while continuing to think about ways to preserve Lahu culture. Lahu Land, a new initiative, focuses on developing sustainable coffee cultivation as a way of both generating income and supporting efforts to negotiate a path, acceptable to the community, through the tricky process of adaptation.


"Culture and Mindfulness: A new view on culture: Langerian Psychology of possibility and its cultural implications"

Monday, October 14, 2013  ::   4:00-5:30 p.m. Academic Instructional Center West, room 210

This talk will highlight the components of mindfulness versus mindlessness and discuss how cultures can be mindlessly defined, described and analyzed.

Sponsored by Center for Cross-Cultural Research


Film Review & Discussion:

Girl Rising

Friday, October 11, 2013
Fraser Hall 4 :: 6:30-9:00pm

Girl Rising is a new feature film about the strength of the human spirit and the power of education to change the world. 

Co-sponsored by the Center for International Studies, Woodring College of Education, and Women Studies


Western Alumna to Discuss Her Peace Corps Service in Fiji

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013  ::  4-5 p.m
Academic Instructional Center West, room 204

Western Washington University graduate Samantha Russell will share her experiences as a Peace Corps volunteer working in environmental resource management in Fiji.

Sponsored by the Peace Corps


Fairhaven College, Witness for Peace and WWU Diversity invite you to hear Jhon Jairo Castro at the World Issues Forum

"No Longer Shackled by Chains but by our Economic Conditions: The struggle for Trade, Labor & Racial Justice in Colombia’s Ports”

October 9, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium

“On tour with Witness for Peace, Jhon Jairo Castro will share his experience as an Afro-Colombian labor leader in one of the deadliest countries in the world to exercise labor rights. Jhon Jairo has worked as a longshoreman and labor rights organizer for over eleven years, leading various actions in Colombia’s principle port city of Buenaventura. A voice from the port, through which 60 percent of Colombian imports and exports pass, is especially significant in the wake of the approval of the U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement. Jhon Jairo will share what privatization and free trade have meant for Buenaventura’s Afro-Colombian community, who make up nearly 90% of the city’s population.”

Jhon Jairo Castro is the President of the Buenaventura chapter of the Portworkers Union in Colombia's principle port city, through which 60 percent of Colombian imports and exports pass. He has worked as a longshoreman and organized for labor rights for over eleven years, despite receiving death threats in a country that has the highest rate of murder for trade unionists in the world, and that has a 90% impunity rate for cases of violence against unionists.

“With privatization we found ourselves mired in modern slavery…no longer bound by chains, but by our economic conditions. As portworkers we don’t even make minimum wage. We earn about $45/month working 12 to 36 hour-shifts in some cases, and how are we supposed to provide for our families on that income? With privatization comes exploitation and social decomposition.”--Member of the Portworkers Union

Witness for Peace is excited to present Jhon Jairo Castro, the President of the Buenaventura chapter of the Portworkers Union, to share his experience as an Afro-Colombian labor leader in one of the deadliest countries in the world to exercise labor rights. A voice from the port through which 60 percent of Colombian imports and exports pass is especially significant in the wake of the approval of the U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement. Jhon Jairo will share what privatization and free trade have meant for Buenaventura’s Afro-Colombian community, who make up nearly 90% of the city’s population.


CLIMATE & CULTURE CHANGE IN THE ANDES

December 27, 2013 through January 15, 2014

The Center for Social Well Being celebrates 13 years offering our 3 week training program in interdisciplinary qualitative field methods, as well as Spanish and Quechua language classes, in the Peruvian Andes. The combined undergraduate and graduate level seminar is held at the center's rural base, an adobe lodge on an ecological ranch in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range of the Callejón de Huaylas, 7 hours northeast of Lima. Coursework provides in-depth orientation to theory and practice in field investigation that emphasizes methods in Participatory Action Research and Andean Ethnography centered on themes of Climate Change with respect to Ecology, Health, Education, Community Organization and related topics. Students have the opportunity to actively engage in ongoing investigations in local agricultural communities to develop effective field research techniques, and to acquire language skills. In addition, the program provides excursions to museums, archaeological sites, glacial lakes and hot springs; optional recreational activities include hiking, mountain biking, rafting, kayaking, rock climbing and trekking. The program tuition fee is $4,000 US dollars which includes all in-country travel, food and accommodations at the rural center, course materials, classes and field activities. The program is under the direction of Applied Medical Anthropologist, Patricia J. Hammer, Ph.D., as well as Ecologist and Field Coordinator, Flor de María Barreto Tosi.

  • For an application: phammer@wayna.rcp.net.pe
  • For further program details: www.socialwellbeing.org

Attending the AAA meetings in Chicago? Be sure to join us:

  • Patsa Puqun: 10,000 years of Adaptation and Mitigation of Environmental Changes in the Andes:  Wed. Nov. 20, 1pm
  • The Inextricability of Environment and Culture in the Emergence of 21st Century Maladies: Potential Contributions of Anthropology:Fri. Nov. 22, 1:45pm

About the Anthropology Department at WWU

Page Updated 04.22.2014