Electrical Outlet Use

Many apartments and residences are not wired to support the numbers of electrical appliances and computer equipment used in today’s technological world. Greater electrical use increases the potential for fire if outlets are overloaded.

Overloading electrical circuits can strain any building’s electrical system. When that happens, wires can heat up and begin to melt. That can lead to a fire.

Print and use this checklist for your home.  View printer friendly version (PDF format.)

Power Strips

Use power strips with surge protectors rather than extension cords.

Use strips or protectors that have a built-in circuit breaker. The breaker will trip if the strip is overloaded or there is a power surge.

Use strips or protectors that have the UL (Underwriters Laboratory) seal of approval.

Never plug one strip into another. Always plug then directly into an outlet.

Extension Cords: Use extension cords only temporarily.

Use only cords that have the UL (Underwriters Laboratory) seal of approval.

Never plug one extension cord into another.

Never use multi-plug outlet adapters to obtain more outlets.

Replace worn or frayed cords.

Avoid running cords under carpets, rugs or tiles.

Interior extension cords should be less than 6 feet.

Page Updated 08.06.2012