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Committee on Undergraduate Education Meeting Minutes 

 

Date:

1/14/10

Time:

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Room:

Wilson Library 268

Attendees:

Listed below

Approval: CUE 1/21/10

 

Called to order by Kathleen Kennedy.

I.            Approval of the minutes

Minutes from 11/12/09 meeting approved.

 

II.            Announcements

In order to meet ACC deadlines, CUE will meet on 1/21/10 and not on 1/28/10.  Matt Miller’s subcommittee on rubrics will meet on 1/28/10.  We may need to approve minutes by email for one or both meetings.

 

III.            Curricular Proposals/Requests

 

Course

GUR Category

Requested action

Reason/note

CUE Action

THTR 202

HUM Option 1

NEW GUR COURSE

Course may focus on a variety of topics depending on year or instructor. Provided syllabus is one example only.

Approved and sent to ACC

HIST 121

HUM Option 1

NEW GUR COURSE

Course was taught as HIST 197b in fall 2009.

Approved and sent to ACC (Kennedy abstained)

HIST 123

HUM Option 1

NEW GUR COURSE

Course was taught as HIST 197a in fall 2009 and HIST 197 in fall 2008.

Approved and sent to ACC (Kennedy abstained)

HIST 262

Block B-CGM (domestic)

NEW GUR COURSE

Committee discussed potential impact on courses with similar content (e.g. FAIR 219 African American Experience; FAIR 213d Slave Narratives and Other Testimonies of the Old South).

Approved and sent to ACC (Kennedy abstained)

ENG 201

CCOM

NEW GUR COURSE

In order to approve as a CCOM GUR, course must have 30 credits as a prerequisite.

Approved, pending adding 30 credits to prerequisites. [1/15 department updated new course forms with 30 credits] Sent to ACC

LAT 203

HUM Option 1

NEW GUR COURSE

 

Approved and sent to ACC

FIN 215

SSC

NEW GUR COURSE

Existing course.

Approved and sent to ACC

RUSS 120

BCOM

NEW GUR COURSE

New sequence; See RUSS 103; [Correct title confirmed to be Elementary Russian 2]

Approved and sent to ACC

ANTH 364

Block A – CGM (global)

CANCEL GUR COURSE

Cancel course (no longer have faculty to teach course)

Approved and sent to ACC

ENG 203

BCOM

CANCEL GUR COURSE

See also ENG 201 and 202 proposals.

Approved and sent to ACC

RUSS 103

BCOM

CANCEL GUR COURSE

Course replaced by new sequence

Approved and sent to ACC

SCED 294

SCI

CANCEL GUR COURSE

Cancel GUR component

Approved and sent to ACC

MATH 107

QSR (Other)

GUR COURSE REVISION

Description

Approved and sent to ACC

MATH 112

QSR (Other)

GUR COURSE REVISION

Prerequisite

Approved and sent to ACC

MATH 156

QSR (Stand alone course)

GUR COURSE REVISION

Description

Approved and sent to ACC

MATH 157

QSR (Stand alone course)

GUR COURSE REVISION

Description

Approved and sent to ACC

MATH 381

QSR (Other)

GUR COURSE REVISION

Prerequisite

Approved and sent to ACC

PLSC 372

SSC

GUR COURSE REVISION

Prerequisite

Approved and sent to ACC

BIOL 101

LSCI

GUR COURSE REVISION

Description

Approved and sent to ACC

ENG 202

BCOM

GUR COURSE REVISION

Description

Approved and sent to ACC

 

Course approval discussion:

·         Theater: Probably would expect 200 as cap for the course.  Tend to enroll freshman and sophomores in this type of course.  ATUS provides editing/use of camera workshops. Other faculty could teach this course.  Faculty discussed the challenges of approving a course that has changing syllabus/curriculum and that may have similar content to other courses in the future.

·         History: Committee is pleased the department is moving classes from experimental to permanent rubrics.  CUE likes that courses offer a discussion hour.

·         Finance: Committee is pleased to see Finance & Marketing department offering a SSC GUR.

·         English: The Admissions Office had concern that students who currently test out of ENG 101 may be required to take ENG 203.  If that was the case, the lack of waiver may cause WWU to not be as competitive with other WA schools.  The committee was able to clarify that this will not be an issue, as ENG 203 would not be a requirement for those students. There is no change to the AP transfer waiver.  Committee members appreciated that there is another Block C GUR (ENG 201).

 

REQUESTS FOR NEW GUR COURSES

THTR 202: Film Genre

3 credits, 2 hour lecture course + 2 hour lab/studio, HUM Option 1, not a FYE, repeatable up to 9 credits

 

Catalog description: 

Exploring the development, structure, conventions, aesthetics, historical and cultural facets that comprise a specific genre in film.  Examples include Film Noir, Western, Horror, etc.  

 

Rationale/goals for course:

Deeper critical analysis of genre films than intro and survey courses can offer.  Focus on what constitutes a genre, what conventions apply, and how culture shapes genre. Upon successful completion, students will be able to articulate their understanding of basic narrative principles, how genre is created and what socio-cultural influences help shape and define a specific genre.

 

GUR content:

1.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

X

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

X

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

 

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

 

  • Explore, imagine and create.

X

2.       In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

SKILLS: Through lecture, class discussion and film screenings, students will be exposed to concepts regarding film as an art form, conventions of genre, and cultural influences and expression through film. Students will be required to demonstrate analysis and effective communication through participation in discussion, written analysis (midterm), quizzes and a video presentation (final).  Weekly readings, lectures and film screenings will require interpretive skills from varied sources. The group video project enables students to utilize university technological resources for video (audio) capture, editing and delivery. The group video project also requires students to work collaboratively in the making of a film; creating a narrative, shooting sequence (storyboard), filming, editing and sound design.

RESPONSIBILTY: The video project will provide opportunity for students to see the impact they have on their group, and to watch the films of their cohorts. We will study the influences of filmmakers on society and culture, or communal groups, as well as how the values and beliefs of a community are represented through specific films.

INTEGRATIVE LEARNING: Again, the video project and its components (narrative, storyboard, filming and collaboration) will facilitate exploration, imagination and creativity in the production of a narrative film. 

 

3.       How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

Through analysis of the expressive nature of film, including thematic, socio-cultural and narrative elements, as well as imagery. The course will explore the issues and forces that create and sustain a film genre, the conventions of storytelling within that genre, and how changes within the genre reflect the culture and society in which they are created. 

 

HIST 121: World History to 500

5 credits, 4 hour lecture +1 hour discussion, HUM Option 1, not a FYE, elective in History

 

Catalog description: 

Survey of major topics in World History from the origins of civilization to 500 AD.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

This course meets the needs of:

·         History major/ minor, and prepares students broadly for upper-division offerings in the department.

·         History/Social Studies major.

·         New state mandates for chronological and World History field competencies for social studies teachers.

This course also positions Western’s History Department to:

Respond to developments within the university in comparative and interdisciplinary studies.

 

GUR content:

1.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

X

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

X

2. In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

Students will have to discuss course materials in class as well as in various written assignments. These written assignments will include workshops and rewrites. Assignments are devised around complex problems, and students are asked to explore these problems and formulate their own positions based on critical analysis of the evidence. The course will include the use a wide variety of source material, including both the historical record and material culture (which includes visual media). The comparative approach to world history and culture speaks broadly to personal and social responsibility. By its very nature this course investigates various assumptions values and beliefs at all levels about communities throughout the world both geographically and chronologically. Great attention is paid in the course to the impact of environment on human communities, and to the political choices made within those communities. As historians we ask the students to reflect on their role as intellectuals in society. This course requires them to do so in an interdisciplinary and comparative manner.

 

3. How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

This course embraces the study of human communities and the role people have played in shaping both their socio-cultural and physical environments, with special attention to the methods of inquiry and forms of expression in the field of history and related disciplines.

 

 

HIST 123: World History, 1500 to the Present

5 credits, 4 hours lecture + 1 hour discussion, HUM Option 1, not a FYE, elective in History

 

Catalog description: 

Survey of major topics in World History from 1500 to the present.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

This course meets the needs of:

·         History major/ minor, and prepares students broadly for upper-division offerings in the department.

·         History/Social Studies major.

·         New state mandates for chronological and World History field competencies for social studies teachers.

This course also positions Western’s History Department to:

Respond to developments within the university in comparative and interdisciplinary studies.

 

GUR content:

1.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

X

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

X

2. In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

Students will have to discuss course materials in class as well as in various written assignments. These written assignments will include workshops and rewrites. Assignments are devised around complex problems, and students are asked to explore these problems and formulate their own positions based on critical analysis of the evidence. The course will include the use a wide variety of source material, including both the historical record and material culture (which includes visual media). The comparative approach to world history and culture speaks broadly to personal and social responsibility. By its very nature this course investigates various assumptions values and beliefs at all levels about communities throughout the world both geographically and chronologically. Great attention is paid in the course to the impact of environment on human communities, and to the political choices made within those communities. As historians we ask the students to reflect on their role as intellectuals in society. This course requires them to do so in an interdisciplinary and comparative manner.

 

3. How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

This course embraces the study of human communities and the role people have played in shaping both their socio-cultural and physical environments, with special attention to the methods of inquiry and forms of expression in the field of history and related disciplines.

 

 

 

 

 

HIST 262: African American History to 1865

5 credit lecture course, Block B-CGM (domestic), not a FYE, elective in History

 

Catalog description: 

The history of people of African descent in American and U.S. history from the beginnings of the trans-Atlantic Slave trade through the Civil War.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

We teach African American History from 1865.  This course fills a hole in our curriculum.

GUR content:

1.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

 

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

 

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

 

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

 

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

2. In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

This course requires students to analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written and visual forms because its primary forms of assessment require students to develop historical arguments.  In addition to oral class participation, students will be required to write at least two papers that ask them to create and defend their own historical argument.  They will base this argument on a variety of primary source material including visual representations, newspaper ads and articles, speeches, interviews and other documents.  This point speaks to the second intellectual and practical skill listed in the general education rubric: analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.  Writing effective historical essays inherently requires mastery of these skills.  Students of history must make judgments about what primary source materials support or challenge their arguments, how to read various types of sources and how to synthesize diverse and conflicting sources. Accordingly, this course requires students to identify and analyze complex problems.

3. How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

One of the most important reasons to study history is to prepare students to participate in a complex democracy (if they are citizens of democracies); that is, to help them learn to exercise their rights and responsibilities as citizens.  By studying history students learn how to analyze complex problems as well as to evaluate the long and short term consequences of particular choices.  The study of African American history raises important questions about the strengths and limits of American ideas of freedom, liberty, democracy and property.  This history illustrates both the limits of early American ideals as well as the promise of diversity.  A close examination of African American history provides students with a greater appreciation for challenges overcome to expand American democracy and liberty and the importance of approaching historical as well as contemporary questions from various locations. To this end, we will examine such difficult issues as the use of violence to achieve just ends, the differences between assimilation, accommodation and resistance, interrelationships between racial groups, and the development of race as a category of difference in American history. In this respect, the course also addresses the desire for students to recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in and contributing as a citizen in a diverse society.  In this respect, this course fulfills the goals of the Comparative Gender and Multicultural Studies GUR by “acquainting them with the values and viewpoints of a variety of (American) cultures” that will help them “overcome provincialism.”

 

ENG 201: Writing in the Humanities

5 credit lecture course, CCOM, general elective, not a FYE, Prerequisites = English 101 or 4/5 AP English Language Exam or 710 SAT or 28 ACT and 30 credits

 

Catalog description: 

Advanced instruction and practice in writing using ideas, texts and questions from a specified topic in the humanities. Areas and focus vary with section.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

Rationale:

·         English will increase the number of offerings for COM C courses (currently very sparse).

·         In accordance with the COM C learning outcomes, this course offers explicit instruction for conducting research in the humanities.  Currently, the English department gets many requests for writing courses with a research component.

·         This course fills a gap that currently exists for students who want more advanced instruction in critical writing, reading, and research after they have completed English 101 and before they take their WP courses in their majors.

·         The course serves as an “advanced placement” option for students with high AP, SAT or ACT courses.

·         This course provides an option for transfer students whose previous writing courses may not meet the requirements of English 101 (COM A).

·         This course offers an option for students who have completed English 101 but have fewer than 45 credits and are looking for smaller-sized classes.

Goals:

·         To gain an understanding of the discourse community knowledge, subject matter knowledge, genre knowledge, rhetorical knowledge, process knowledge, and meta-cognitive knowledge needed to write about topics in the humanities. (See attached).

·         To demonstrate understanding and competency in the general learning outcomes for COM C courses (rhetorical knowledge, critical thinking, reading, writing, processes, and conventions) as applicable to topics in the humanities. (See attached).

 

GUR content:

1. The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

X

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

X

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

 

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

 

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

 

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

X

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

X

2. In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

·         Analyze and communicate effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

English 201 is primarily a course in analytical thinking and critical writing. Students will expand their strategies for analyzing print and visual texts rhetorically (including their own) and will be doing some kind of formal and informal writing every week. Students will develop conceptual knowledge and understanding of discourse communities, genre, audience, tone, and design. They will gain greater facility and control with basic conventions, documentation, and citation practices. Students will prepare a formal oral presentation of their inquiry projects at the end of the term.

·         Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

As a COM C course, English 201 will include outside inquiry and research on selected topics. Students will learn how to use and evaluate library and internet sources.

·         Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

Students in English 201 will learn to navigate some of the following:  library tools (data bases, bibliographies, archival research, on-line journals, interlibrary loan); internet sources (blogs, wikis, web pages); and relevant computer programs and Office tools.

·         Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

Students in English 201 will have multiple opportunities for collaborative work in some of the following ways:  research clusters, peer response groups, blackboard discussion groups; collaborative presentation panels.

·         Reflect on one’s work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

Students in English 101 will have multiple and ongoing opportunities to reflect (in writing), both individually and in small groups, on work in progress. Students will also engage in a formal reflective piece of writing on their learning at the end of the course that requires them to expound on the “so what” question. So what is important here? So why does my work matter? Ethical dimensions will be addressed in discussions of intellectual property and rhetorical choices in disciplinary contexts

·         Identify and analyze complex problems.

Students will be taught how to “problematize” and “complicate” issues from multiple perspectives in their reading for discussion. They will learn to construct a complex problem for their inquiry projects.

·         Explore, imagine, and create.

All good inquiry and analysis begin with questions of “how” and “why.” No matter what the conventions of the final product entail, exploration, imagination, and creativity are part of the processes of getting there.

3. How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

Please see question #1 above. English 201 effectively extends and deepens students’ literacies and skills in a variety of contexts in the humanities through critical reading, analytical writing, and clear speaking. Students also develop an increased facility with using information technology.

 

LAT 203: Intermediate Latin

4 credit lecture course, HUM Option 1, Prerequisite = Latin 202 or equivalent, requirement in the Latin minor, general elective, not a FYE

 

Catalog description: 

The materials currently in the catalogue applicable to Intermediate Latin will be applied; this course is the third quarter of the intermediate/second year of instruction in Latin.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

The course represents the completion of the second year of instruction.  We are renumbering it because we want to eliminate it as a repeatable course and offer in its place Latin 340, 341 or 342.

 

GUR content:

1. The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

X

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

X

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

X

2. In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

A narrative is a story with a beginning, middle, and an end.  I am not going to tell you a story here. Rather, I shall explain thus:  The study of a language is at the basis of all the "competencies" listed above, including those dealing with quantitative and scientific reasoning and applying technology in various ways. (I did not want to appear hybristic in my claims.)  Studying Latin requires first of all that a human utterance be understood as that: a statement which requires decipherment in human terms.  Who/what is the subject of this sentence? Is the verb active, stative or passive? What is the denotative and connotative meaning of the statement?  Now these questions just apply to decoding a piece of Latin: when one considers that Latin teaches students to express themselves in another language, the student first must consider exactly what is being expressed in terms of topic, action and its concomitants; then, what is the range of meaning in the words selected to express the concept.  Herein lies one of the extraordinarily useful aspects of learning to communicate in another language:  one must understand EXACTLY what one is trying to say.  Our students are very skilled in producing pages and pages of English that says effectively very little: it is impossible to do such a thing in a language one is learning. Hence one becomes aware of how to express oneself in English as well as in the target language being studied. Item two:  analyzing and interpreting information from varied sources:  one does not study Latin without an awareness of its depth in time:  our earliest texts are nearly 2400 years old; texts are written on papyrus, stone, parchment, paper, and electronically on the internet; until the last century they were printed using a system of ligatures and abbreviations. Item three:  Working collaboratively to effect projects:  Please check out the Latin videos created by the Latin 103 class last year; these are available on the Classical Studies web-pages.  These are obvious displays of group-projects; however, one can apply this idea to smaller day-to-day activity in the classroom, and again I am describing the procedures of all language-learning classrooms where active methods (as is the case with Latin) are applied:  to communicate, one must speak with someone. One cannot learn another language by speaking with oneself.  Projects in the second year of Latin include skits, debates held before the class, catechetical examinations (oral questions and answers), emailing to Latin users around the world. The second rubric above, "Personal and Social Responsibility," deals with outcomes that can be expected from the intelligent study of literature and art.  Latin literature at the intermediate level introduces the study of ancient, medieval and modern texts (although concentration upon texts does not take place until the third year, reading of the canon begins in the second) which are called "Classics" because they form the foundation of the Western intellectual tradition. The outcomes listed under the final rubric of "Integrative Learning" again can be attributed to all language study.  We teach Latin actively at WWU: this means that students are expected to generate their own texts, as it were, to create their own literary art at the same time that they are studying the canon.  I can imagine no more effective was to address complex problems than in the process of creating a piece of literary art:  but this brings us back to the material I was discussing at the beginning of this protrepsis for the study of language.

3. How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

So the catalogue (2006-7) states, "The humanities study principal themes, issues and images concerning human beings and their place in the universe, as these have been shaped and expressed since ancient times, in thought, imagination and action."  Latin teaches human beings how to communicate in a language which has been for two thousand years the means of communication at first within the Roman Empire (from Britain to Iraq, Rhine River to North Africa at its greatest extent), then throughout Western and Central Europe as a learned language up to the present. (Our intermediate language students recently had a Skype-chat with a Latin speaker in Poland.)  Moreover, through Latin our students access texts that form the foundation of our cultural tradition:  in philosophy, Seneca, Cicero, Augustine, Boethius; in poetry, Vergil, Horace, Statius, + 1500 years of lyricists whom I haven't got room here to name; in Christian tradition, St. Jerome's Vulgate translation of the Bible, Thomas Aquinas, Hildegard of Bingen. I am not even going to start talking here about the Western tradition of law, which owes its codification and traditions of legal exegesis to Romans, all done in Latin until the last century. I might add here that Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, and hundreds of other scientists of the early modern and later periods wrote in Latin.

 

 

FIN 215:  Personal Finance (existing course)

4 credit lecture course, SSC, not a FYE, no prerequisites

 

Catalog description:  (existing course description)

215 PERSONAL FINANCE (3)

(Not intended for students who plan to be finance majors.) Sources of personal income, saving and consumer spending patterns. Development of techniques for planning and budgeting consumption expenditures and saving, with special emphasis on the use of saving allocations to achieve personal goals; real property, insurance, financial investment, retirement, estate and tax planning.

 

Rationale/goals for course: n/a

 

GUR content:

1. The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

X

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

X

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

2. In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

Intellectual and Practical Skills:

Includes but is not limited to (see attached syllabus for further details):

1.       analyzing/writing/presenting two “learn by doing” application-based projects to the instructor and classmates.

2.       reading/comprehending/interpreting and discussing various “current events” articles obtained from sources such as the Wall Street Journal

3.       performing online research related to various issues in personal finance

4.       predicting retirement needs/expected Social Security benefits using online financial calculators and understanding the limitations of such resources

5.       obtaining/completing necessary personal income tax forms

6.       evaluating various payday lenders and learning the cost of using such resources

 

Personal and Social Responsibility:

As an informed and effective citizen, everyone should be able to make decisions that will lead to good financial health at a personal level and the nation as a whole.  In addition to teaching basic financial skills that are practical from an everyday standpoint, this course will show (using examples from the current financial/economic crisis) how collective decisions of individuals have widespread implications/impacts.  The course will offer exposure to broader issues such as potential impacts of changes in the tax laws on various groups of people, health care reform, the financial ramifications of a political platform and the longevity of women vs. men coupled with women’s aversion to risk and how that might impact their financial future.

 

Integrative Learning:                 

Includes but is not limited to a discussion of the basics of the time value of money and how it impacts both borrowing and investing situations, the impact of inflation over an extended time period, evaluating different types of mortgages, determining the most beneficial tax form/schedules to use in various situations, evaluating a "rent vs. buy" decision  regarding an asset such as a house or automobile, strategic and tactical asset allocation for optimal risk/return trade-offs at various stages in a person’s life, etc.

 

These basic issues create complex problems for individuals, various social groups and society as a whole.  The course gives the student the opportunity to grapple with the integration of a variety of issues at various levels as well as integrating basic economics, social, behavioral and mathematical learning.

 

3. How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

This course should be categorized as a Social Science GUR, mainly because it falls under the application of economic behavior.  Faced with an increasingly complex financial environment, people must be armed with some amount of basic knowledge to effectively evaluate financial issues for themselves or others at various points in their lives.  FIN 215 will address, among other things, money management and debt management, tax issues, renting vs. buying an asset, mortgages, insurance types and costs, the risk/return trade-off of various investments, diversification benefits, and retirement planning.  The course is both application-based and conceptual as it covers both practical aspects of personal finance and offers an overview of broader financial issues (such as the difference in stocks vs. bonds vs. money market securities, for example, or the benefits/costs of saving vs. spending on a national level).

 

FIN 215 should fall under the Social Sciences GUR category rather than Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning because the focus of the course is not quantitative but rather on acquiring knowledge and critical thinking.  Approximately 30% of the course is quantitative.  For instance, students would discuss the fact that returns on stock vary widely, but they would not discuss the particulars of calculating a standard deviation.  Or, students would discuss the different types of allowable tax deductions and the difference between an allowable tax deduction and a tax credit.  Examples would be provided and the students would be expected to demonstrate their proficiency by completing a tax form, but the focus wouldn’t be on the math behind the tax form.  As another example, the benefits of earning interest on interest and the effect of borrowing money over an extended time period will be discussed, but the focus would not be on the time value of money equations.  Rather, the students would have access to online financial calculators or interest factor tables.

 

RUSS 120 – Elementary Russian 2

5 credit lecture course; BCOM, Prerequisite = RUSS 110

 

Catalog description: 

The second half of the introductory Russian language sequence.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

The absolute beginning course for students who have had no prior Russian.

 

GUR content:

1. The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

 

  • Explore, imagine and create.

X

2. In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

The course teaches students to express themselves in the medium of Russian language within an appropriate Russian Culture context. Students need to analyze and interpret not only the grammar, but also understand how their self expression will impact other speakers in a different societal and cultural setting.

 

3. How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

This course replaces the current GUR, Russian 103, and pursues the same goals.  Students are challenged to develop communicative skills appropriate for Russian social settings. This involves critical reasoning and the ability to understand a new society and culture. The clear, creative and correct expression of one’s ideas is critical to this course.

 

REQUESTS FOR GUR COURSE CANCELLATIONS

 

ANTH 364: Peoples of the Pacific – Cancel GUR Course (ACGM, global)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Course developed by instructor who has retired and area is not in expertise of new instructor.

 

ENG 203: Writing in Context – Cancel GUR Course (BCOM)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Currently, students can meet the prerequisite to English major courses by taking English 202 or 203, but in the department’s assessment of 203 it found that 203 was not always the preparatory equivalent of 202. Moreover, students are often confused about the differences between these two courses, which may be why 203 courses tend to fill later than 202.  Additionally, community college transfer equivalencies will be clarified by having one course, making it easier for community colleges to advised English interest students appropriately.  The department will replace most of the current 203 sections with 202 sections; a few of the sections will be converted to the new proposed course 201(Please see rationale for the new ENG 201 course.)  The department is also proposing to revise the description of 202 to retain aspects of 203 that have proved successful.

 

 

RUSS 103: Elementary Russian – Cancel GUR Course (BCOM)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:  

This sequence Russian 101, 103, 103 (4 credits each) is being replaced by Russian 110, 120 (5 credits each).

 

SCED 294: Investigative Science – Cancel GUR category (SCI)

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

294 INVESTIGATIVE SCIENCE (4)

Prereq: three courses in the natural sciences.  Experimental science for pre-service elementary education students.  Through “directed discovery,” students collaborate in developing and executing a plan to investigate a topic as a common thread in biology, chemistry, geology and physics.  Includes experimental work and discussion/lecture, allowing students to develop a theoretical base and practice experimental design.

294 INVESTIGATIVE SCIENCE (4)

Prereq: three courses in the natural sciences.  Experimental science for pre-service elementary education students.  Through “directed discovery,” students collaborate in developing and executing a plan to investigate a topic as a common thread in biology, chemistry, geology and physics.  Includes experimental work and discussion/lecture, allowing students to develop a theoretical base and practice experimental design.

FINAL COPY

294 INVESTIGATIVE SCIENCE (4)

Prereq: three courses in the natural sciences.  Experimental science for pre-service elementary education students.  Through “directed discovery,” students collaborate in developing and executing a plan to investigate a topic as a common thread in biology, chemistry, geology and physics.  Includes experimental work and discussion/lecture, allowing students to develop a theoretical base and practice experimental design.

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:  

We are removing the GUR component from this class because pre-service elementary teachers will have already satisfied their lab science GUR requirements by taking the three natural science GURs (preferably 201, 202 and 203) that are required for their endorsements – so there is no need for 294 to be a GUR since we are only serving pre-service teachers with this class.

 

REQUESTS FOR GUR COURSE REVISIONS

 

MATH 107 – Revision to Description

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

107 MATHEMATICAL REASONING AND ITS APPLICATIONS (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Math Placement Test or at least C- in Math 99, 106, 112, or a college intermediate algebra course. Reading quantitative information, reasoning, personal finance, data display and summary, assessing risk; quantitative decisions in life, careers, and public issues. Students interested in studying a single area of mathematics in detail should consider substituting a course from MATH 114, 118, 124, 156, 157 or 240. To take MATH 114, a student must take a math placement test or MATH 112.

107 MATHEMATICAL REASONING AND ITS APPLICATIONS (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Math Placement Test or at least C- in Math 99, 106, 112, or a college intermediate algebra course. Reading quantitative information, reasoning, personal finance, data display and summary, assessing risk; quantitative decisions in life, careers, and public issues. Students interested in studying a single area of mathematics in detail should consider substituting taking higher level mathematics courses should instead take a course from MATH 112, 114, 118, 124, 156, 157 or 240. To take MATH 114, a student must take a math placement test or MATH 112. Note: This course is not an acceptable prereq for MATH 112.

FINAL COPY

107 MATHEMATICAL REASONING AND ITS APPLICATIONS (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Math Placement Test or at least C- in Math 99, 106, 112, or a college intermediate algebra course.  Reading quantitative information, reasoning, personal finance, data display and summary, assessing risk; quantitative decisions in life, careers, and public issues. Students interested in taking higher level mathematics courses should instead take a course from MATH 112, 114, 118, 124, 156, 157 or 240. Note: This course is not an acceptable prereq for MATH 112.

REASON(S) FOR CANCELLATION OR REVISION:

1. Clarification that this course is not a necessary nor sufficient prerequisite for MATH 112 and explicitly listing the courses more suitable for more advanced work in mathematics.

 

MATH 112 – Revision to Prerequisite

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

112 FUNCTIONS AND ALGEBRAIC METHODS (5)

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Math Placement Test or completion of a college intermediate algebra course with C- or better. Pattern recognition and generalization, building mathematical models and problem solving are emphasized. Supporting topics include polynomials, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, graphs, rational expressions, radicals and functions. Graphing calculator required. Cannot be counted toward majors or minors in mathematics or computer science.

 

112 FUNCTIONS AND ALGEBRAIC METHODS (5)

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Math Placement Test, MATH 99, or completion of a college intermediate algebra course with C- or better. Note: Neither MATH 106 nor 107 are acceptable prerequisites for this course. Pattern recognition and generalization, building mathematical models and problem solving are emphasized. Supporting topics include polynomials, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, graphs, rational expressions, radicals and functions. Graphing calculator required. Cannot be counted toward majors or minors in mathematics or computer science.

FINAL COPY

112 FUNCTIONS AND ALGEBRAIC METHODS (5)

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Math Placement Test, MATH 99, or completion of a college intermediate algebra course with C- or better. Note: Neither MATH 106 nor 107 are acceptable prerequisites for this course. Pattern recognition and generalization, building mathematical models and problem solving are emphasized. Supporting topics include polynomials, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, graphs, rational expressions, radicals and functions. Graphing calculator required. Cannot be counted toward majors or minors in mathematics or computer science.

REASON(S) FOR CANCELLATION OR REVISION:

To clarify the prerequisites for this course; avoiding frequent student misunderstanding.

 

MATH 156 – Revision to Description

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

156 ALGEBRA WITH APPLICATIONS TO BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the intermediate mathematics placement test or at least C- in Math 112. Equations and inequalities, graphs and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, mathematics of finance, systems of linear equations and matrices, systems of linear inequalities.

 

156 ALGEBRA WITH APPLICATIONS TO BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the iIntermediate mMathematics pPlacement tTest or at least C- in Math 112. Equations and inequalities, graphs and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, mathematics of applications to finance, systems of linear equations and matrices, systems of linear inequalities.  This course is designed for business students continuing on to MATH 157.

FINAL COPY

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Mathematics Placement Test or at least C- in Math 112. Equations and inequalities, graphs and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, applications to finance, This course is designed for business students continuing on to MATH 157.

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

To update the list of topics covered and to clarify the intent of the course.

 

MATH 157 – Revision to Description

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

157 CALCULUS WITH APPLICATIONS TO BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the advanced mathematics placement test or at least C- in Math 156, Math 114 or 118. Limits, rates of change, differentiation, graphing and optimization, integration, business applications, partial differentiation. Math 124 may be substituted for Math 157. Cannot be taken for credit by a student who has already completed another college-level calculus course.

157 CALCULUS WITH APPLICATIONS TO BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the aAdvanced mMathematics  pPlacement tTest or at least C-  in Math MATH 156, Math 114 or 118. Limits, rates of change, differentiation, graphing and optimization, integration, business applications, partial differentiation. Math 124 may be substituted for Math 157 but not vice versa. Cannot be taken for credit by a student who has already completed another college-level calculus course.

FINAL COPY

157 CALCULUS WITH APPLICATIONS TO BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the Advanced Mathematics Placement Test or at least C- in MATH 156, 114 or 118. Limits, rates of change, differentiation, graphing and optimization, integration, business applications, partial differentiation. Math 124 may be substituted for Math 157 but not vice versa. Cannot be taken for credit by a student who has already completed another college-level calculus course.

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

To clarify the issue of course equivalency.

 

MATH 381 – Revision to Prerequisite

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

381 TEACHING K-8 MATHEMATICS I (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Math Placement Test or a grade of C or better in MATH 112 or a college intermediate algebra course, and any one of the following: ELED 370, 372, SPED 420, or ECE 391. Investigations of mathematical topics that focus on logical reasoning, number concepts, and number operations. Emphasis on problem solving, the use of manipulatives and computing technologies, remediation and resource materials, and optimal pedagogical techniques that help students learn quality mathematics. Not acceptable for any department major except BA/Ed-Elementary, and does not satisfy GUR mathematics requirement except for those who complete the BA/Ed-Elementary.

 

381 TEACHING K-8 MATHEMATICS I (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Math Placement Test or a grade of C or better in MATH 112 or a college intermediate algebra course, and any one of the following: ELED 370, 372, SPED 420, or ECE 391. Prereqs must have been met within the last 5 years. Investigations of mathematical topics that focus on logical reasoning, number concepts, and number operations. Emphasis on problem solving, the use of manipulatives and computing technologies, remediation and resource materials, and optimal pedagogical techniques that help students learn quality mathematics. Not acceptable for any department major except BA/Ed-Elementary, and does not satisfy GUR mathematics requirement except for those who complete the BA/Ed-Elementary.

FINAL COPY

381 TEACHING K-8 MATHEMATICS I (4)

Prereq: suitable score on the Intermediate Math Placement Test or a grade of C or better in MATH 112 or a college intermediate algebra course, and any one of the following: ELED 370, 372, SPED 420, or ECE 391. Prereqs must have been met within the last 5 years. Investigations of mathematical topics that focus on logical reasoning, number concepts, and number operations. Emphasis on problem solving, the use of manipulatives and computing technologies, remediation and resource materials, and optimal pedagogical techniques that help students learn quality mathematics. Not acceptable for any department major except BA/Ed-Elementary, and does not satisfy GUR mathematics requirement except for those who complete the BA/Ed-Elementary.

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

To more clearly emphasis the requirement for a current understanding of the mathematics underlying the course content. Particularly relevant for those taking the class at off-campus sites (non-traditional students).

 

PLSC 372 – Revision to prerequisite

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

372 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (5)

Prereq: PLSC 271 or 291. The politics of international trade, investment, lending and economic development.

372 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (5)

Prereq: PLSC 271 or 291 and any ECON course. The politics of international trade, investment, lending and economic development

FINAL COPY

372 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (5)

Prereq: PLSC 271 or 291 and any ECON course. The politics of international trade, investment, lending and economic development.

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Course is designed for political economy majors who have an economics and political science background.  Non majors are welcome, but only if they have the required background materials to facilitate learning.

 

BIOL 101 – Revision to description

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

101 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY (4)

Prereq: MATH 106 or higher. Major ideas and processes of modern biological science at molecular, cellular, organismic and community levels; stresses qualitative and quantitative dimensions of the discipline in lecture, laboratory, field and discussion settings. Lab included.

101 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY (4)

Prereq: MATH 106 or higher. Major ideas and processes of modern biological science at molecular, cellular, organismic and community levels; stresses qualitative and quantitative dimensions of the discipline in lecture, laboratory, field and discussion settings. Lab included. Intended for non-science majors.

FINAL COPY

101 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY (4)

Prereq: MATH 106 or higher. Major ideas and processes of modern biological science at molecular, cellular, organismic and community levels; stresses qualitative and quantitative dimensions of the discipline in lecture, laboratory, field and discussion settings. Lab included. Intended for non-science majors.

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Clarification that the course is not intended for students who plan on pursuing a science degree. There is a common misconception that this course should be taken as a precursor to taking the year long introductory biology series (BIOL 204, 205 and 206), and the addition of the statement that BIOL 101 is “for non-science majors” should eliminate the confusion.

 

 

 

 

ENG 202 – Revision to description

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

202 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (5)

Prereq: English 101 and sophomore status. Focuses on the process of reading, analyzing, and writing critical responses to a variety of literary texts.

202 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (5)

Prereq: English 101 and sophomore status. Focuses on the process of reading, analyzing, and writing critical responses to a variety of literary texts.  A writing course that uses reading, analysis, and discussion of literary and other imaginative texts to teach students how to construct multi-draft, critical papers characteristic of the discipline of English Studies.

FINAL COPY

202 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (5)  

Prereq: English 101 and sophomore status. A writing course that uses reading, analysis, and discussion of literary and other imaginative texts to teach students how to construct multi-draft, critical papers characteristic of the discipline of English Studies.

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Based on its assessment of English 202, the department is adding further specificity about the kind of writing students should master in the course.  “Multi-draft” projects are central to the success of the course, and prepare students for more advanced writing at the 300-level.  The revised description also distinguishes 202 from our other 200-level introductory literature courses that may ask students to write short papers and responses but are not set up to focus specifically on writing instruction.

 

IV. Chair Closing

Meeting was adjourned at 5:30 pm. 

 

 

Minutes submitted by Wendy Knight.

 

Present

Name

Role

Area

Voting

--

Borda, Emily

Faculty

CST

Voting

P

Grimm, Jeffrey

Faculty

CHSS (2)

Voting

P

Kennedy, Kathleen

Faculty

CHSS (1)

Voting

P

Miller, Matthew

Faculty

Woodring

Voting

P

Rinonos-Diaz, Ramon

Student

Appointed by AS

Voting

P

Rossiter, David

Faculty

Huxley

Voting

P

Tag, Sylvia

Faculty

Western Libraries

Voting

P

Takagi, Midori

Faculty

Fairhaven

Voting

--

Thorndike-Christ, Tracy

Faculty

ACC representative

Voting

P

VanderStaay, Steven

Ex Officio

VP Undergrad Education

Voting

P

Vassdal-Ellis, Elsi

Faculty

CFPA

Voting

P

Werder, Carmen

Ex Officio

Director Writing Instruction

Voting

P

Wonder, Nicholas

Faculty

CBE

Voting

P

Knight, Wendy

Recorder

Admin Asst to VPUE

Non-Voting

P

Brunnemer, David

Guest

Registrar’s Office

 

P

Mottner, Sandra

Guest

Finance and Marketing

 

P

Dizney, Patrick

Guest

Theater Arts

 

P

Kimbrough, Christopher

Guest

Admissions Office