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Committee on Undergraduate Education Meeting Minutes

 

Date:

1/21/10

Time:

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Room:

Miller Hall 168

Attendees:

Listed below

Approval:

CUE by email 1/26/10

 

Called to order by Kathleen Kennedy.

 

I.            Approval of the minutes

Minutes from 1/14/10 meeting approved.

 

II.            Announcements

Regular meeting scheduled for 1/28/10 is cancelled since committee met today.  CUE Subcommittee (led by Matt Miller) will be held on 1/28/10 from 3:30 – 5:00 pm in College Hall 131. Next regular meeting agenda items: 1) update on subcommittee work and 2) George Pierce and information on new sustainability initiative.

 

III.            Curricular Proposals/Requests

 

COURSE

GUR CATEGORY

REQUESTED ACTION

REASON/NOTE

CUE  ACTION

HNRS 121

SSC

Course cancellation

Replaced by new Colloquium in Political Science (HNRS 206)

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 155

ACGM

Course cancellation

Course supplanted by Honors 105 and Honors 106 and is no longer offered

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 157

LSCI

Course cancellation

Course replaced by new Colloquium in Physics (HNRS 211)

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 158

LSCI

Course cancellation

Course replaced by new Colloquium in Geology (HNRS 212)

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 159

LSCI

Course cancellation

Course replaced by new Colloquium in Biology (HNRS 159)

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 251

SSC

Course cancellation

Course replaced by new Colloquium in  Psychology (HNRS 204)

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 253

SSC

Course cancellation

Course replaced by new Colloquium in Anthropology (HNRS 203)

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 254

SSC

Course cancellation

Course replaced by new Colloquium in Economics (HNRS 202)

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 255

HUM Option 1

Course cancellation

Course replaced by new Colloquium in Philosophy (HNRS 201)

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 256

HUM Option 1

Course cancellation

Course replaced by new Colloquium in Philosophy (HNRS 201)

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 201

HUM Option 1

New Course request

 

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 202

SSC

New Course request

 

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 203

SSC

New Course request

 

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 204

SSC

New Course request

 

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 206

SSC

New Course request

 

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 211

LSCI

New Course request

On 1/26/10 George Mariz confirmed that course is equivalent to PHYS 101.

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 212

LSCI

New Course request

Prerequisite was corrected to “MATH 107 or equivalent or higher” by George Mariz on 1/25/10.  Originally submitted new course and GUR forms had incorrectly listed MATH 106.  Also, on 1/26/10, Mariz confirmed that HNRS 212 is equivalent to GEOL 101.

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS 213

LSCI

New Course request

 

Approved and sent on to ACC

HNRS Description

 

Program description revision

 

Approved and sent on to ACC

LBRL 231

HUM Option 1

Course revision

Credits and Description

Approved and sent on to ACC

LBRL 283

ACGM

New course request

 

Approved pending new course form.  Changes submitted 1/25/10. Sent on to ACC

LBRL 333

HUM Option 1

Course revision

Description

Approved and sent on to ACC

LBRL 340

ACGM CCOM

New course request

During meeting CUE asked dept to look at changing GUR category to CCOM. CUE approved the course as either an ACGM or CCOM (if appropriate prerequisite changes were resubmitted on new course and GUR proposal forms).

David Curley confirmed on 1/26/10 to include LBRL 332 in the list of prerequisites; need college approval.

Approved as CCOM. Appropriate form changes submitted by Liberal Studies on 1/22/10. Sent on to ACC.

LBRL 362

ACGM

New course request

New course form submitted 1/25/10.

Approved and sent on to ACC.

LBRL 371

ACGM

Course cancellation

Course redesigned as LBRL 362.

Approved and sent on to ACC

A/HI 275

CCOM

Course revision

See course approval discussion below.

Approved pending changes. Revised language submitted by Elsi Vassdal-Ellis on 1/22/10. Sent on to ACC.

Course approval discussion:

·         Honors: George Mariz wanted to publicly thank Lisa Zuzarte for her guidance and assistance in preparing the various forms.

·         Liberal Studies: Committee encouraged department in the future to pare down some of the GUR requirements on any potential new courses.  Committee approved LBRL 340 as submitted, but also encouraged the department to consider changing the GUR category to CCOM, as the course appears to be a good fit.  Liberal Studies Chair David Curley will explore this with the course instructor [course instructor approved change to CCOM].  Committee also discussed LBRL 333 course description language; some members felt it was too vague while others found it appropriate.  

·         Art History: Committee asked that the department revert to the revised language that was submitted from the department to CFPA; committee found the language submitted from CFPA to CUE to be unclear.  Also, since A/HI is a CCOM it needed to have 30 credits added to the listed prerequisites.

REQUESTS FOR GUR COURSE CANCELLATIONS

 

HNRS 121: Introduction to Political Science- Cancel GUR Course (SSC)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Part of a larger revision of existing introductory disciplinary classes from general introductions to colloquia, i.e., to classes that stress not only a GUR level introduction to the subject but provide students with an opportunity to explore a particular topic in depth.

 

HNRS 155: The Non Western Traditions – Cancel GUR Course (ACGM)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Course has been supplanted by Honors 105 and 106 and is no longer offered.

 

HNRS 157: Physics– Cancel GUR Course (LSCI)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Existing introductory disciplinary classes are being replaced by colloquia, i.e., classes that stress not only a GUR level introduction to the subject but provide students with the opportunity to explore a topic in depth.

 

HNRS 158: Geology– Cancel GUR Course (LSCI)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Part of a larger revision of existing introductory disciplinary offerings, moving from classes that provide general introductions to colloquia, i.e., classes that stress not only GUR foundational knowledge in the subject but provide students with the opportunity to explore a topic in depth.

 

HNRS 159: Biology– Cancel GUR Course (LSCI)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Part of a larger revision of existing introductory disciplinary offerings, moving from classes that provide general introductions to colloquia, i.e., classes that stress not only GUR foundational knowledge in the subject but provide students with the opportunity to explore a topic in depth.

 

HNRS 251: Psychology – Cancel GUR course (SSC)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Part of a larger revision of existing introductory disciplinary offerings, moving from classes that provide general introductions to colloquia, i.e., classes that stress not only GUR foundational knowledge in the subject but provide students with the opportunity to explore a topic in depth.

 

HNRS 253: Anthropology – Cancel GUR course (SSC)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Part of a larger revision of existing introductory disciplinary offerings, moving from classes that provide general introductions to colloquia, i.e., classes that stress not only GUR foundational knowledge in the subject but provide students with the opportunity to explore a topic in depth.

 

HNRS 254: Economics – Cancel GUR course (SSC)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Class is being supplanted by a new colloquium in economics which will provide not only a GUR level introduction to the field but will provide students with the opportunity to study an area of economics in depth.

 

HNRS 255: Ethics - Cancel GUR Course (HUM Option 1)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Part of a larger revision of existing introductory disciplinary courses from general introductions to colloquia, i.e., classes that stress not only GUR level mastery of the subject but provide students with the opportunity to explore a topic in depth.

 

HNRS 256: Knowledge and Reality - Cancel GUR Course (HUM Option 1)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

Part of a larger revision of existing introductory disciplinary courses from general introductions to colloquia, i.e., classes that stress not only GUR level mastery of the subject but provide students with the opportunity to explore a topic in depth.

 

LBRL 371: Major Asian and African Traditions: Their Modern Fate– Cancel GUR Course (ACGM)

Reason(s) for cancellation or revision:

This course is being redesigned as LBRL 362: Islam and Muslims in the Indian Ocean World (4), in order to give more emphasis to cross cultural interaction, rather than attempting broad comparisons across many different cultures in Asia and Africa.  We are applying for CGM-A credits in the GER for the redesigned course, as LBRL 371 offers.

 

REQUESTS FOR NEW GUR COURSES

HNRS 201: Colloquium in Philosophy

4 credits, 2 hour lecture course + 2 hour discussion, HUM Option 1, not a FYE, elective in Philosophy

 

Catalog description: 

An introduction to philosophical methods and to the branches of philosophical inquiry.  The class will concentrate on a specific subject or topic in each colloquium, and the area of emphasis will therefore vary from year to year.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

Introduces the student to the basic areas of philosophical inquiry and to the methods of the discipline.

 

GUR content:

1.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

X

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

2.       In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

The class introduces the methods and issues of philosophy, and so it is concerned with analysis of propositions of all sorts, epistemological, metaphysical, ethical, aesthetic, and logical.  Students will look at a variety of sources, everything from the most ancient texts to contemporary issues, and they will be required to develop the intellectual tools necessary to deal with such diverse materials.  Particularly through the study of ethical issues they will confront all of the items in the category of Personal and Social Responsibility above, and in virtually any area of philosophy they will be dealing with complex issues.  This is, after all, the progenitor of virtually all the academic disciplines.  Students will write papers and will also be required to engage in class discussions.

3.       How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

The class focuses on all of the basic areas in the discipline, all of which are already listed as meeting the requirements for inclusion in the humanities GURs.

 

HNRS 202: Colloquium in Economics

4 credits, 2 hour lecture course + 2 hour discussion, SSC, not a FYE, Prereq=Math 112 or higher or equivalent. Recognized by CBE as equivalent to ECON 206 and ECON 207, and the college accepts this class in lieu of them for any major requiring these classes as prerequisites, and the college and department will recognize the colloquium as meeting the same standard.

 

Catalog description: 

An introduction to the principles of micro- and macroeconomics, including the role of the market in allocating scarce resources, the decision making of economic agents, market and regulatory failures, macroeconomic performance, competing theories of the macro economy, the creation of money, and international trade and finance.  Students will have the opportunity for extensive discussion and to explore one or more areas of the discipline.

Rationale/goals for course:

Introduces the student to the concepts of micro- and macro-economics and to methods of the discipline.

 

GUR content:

2.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

 

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

3.       In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

This class introduces students to the basic concepts of micro- and macroeconomics, and as such requires that they understand fundamental ideas concerned with the determination of value, both economic and ethical, and the basic social processes of the sort that are fundamental to an understanding of economics.  They will be required to get below the surface and grasp the interaction of psychological, political, and behavioral factors in the processes of human economic interaction.

4.       How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

The class will concentrate on developing an understanding of the economic process through the investigation of empirical evidence and to grasp the underlying patterns economic behavior.

 

HNRS 203: Colloquium in Anthropology

4 credits, 2 hour lecture course + 2 hour lecture/lab, SSC, not a FYE. Requirement in Anthropology: the department recognizes this class as serving the equivalent of ANTH 201 for any class requiring it as a prerequisite.

 

Catalog description: 

The study of societies that contrast with Western Civilization, leading to an acquaintance with the concept of culture, human variation, and change, and their importance to an understanding of human behavior.  Emphasis on understanding each culture from its own point of view rather than our own.  Class will concentrate on discussion and will provide students with an opportunity to explore one or more areas of the discipline.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

Introduces the student to concepts and methods of cultural anthropology.

 

GUR content:

3.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

X

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

 

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

 

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

4.       In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

Through the study of materials as diverse as printed texts, art, music, religion, and social practices, students will be exposed to cultures on their own terms.  They will be expected to understand the internal and external factors that influence the content and evolution of cultures, and to grasp the diversity of cultures. 

5.       How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

Class will emphasize the development and variation of human culture.

 

 

HNRS 204: Colloquium in Psychology

4 credits, 2 hour lecture course + 2 hour lecture/lab, some discussion time included, SSC, not a FYE.  The psychology department recognizes the current class as meeting the standard for any class that has PSYCH 101 as a prerequisite and will recognize the colloquium as meeting the same standard.

 

Catalog description: 

An introduction to the basic concepts and methods of the discipline of psychology utilizing the results of research investigations.  Students will have an opportunity to perform independent work.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

Course introduces students the methods and concepts of the discipline and meets the standard for any class that lists PSYCH 101 as a prerequisite.

 

GUR content:

4.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

X

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

X

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

 

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

 

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

5.       In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

As a field that partakes of the methods of both the natural and the social sciences, psychology requires that students master both the crafts required of the scientist, the fundamentals of the scientific method and laboratory procedures, as well as those that engage the social investigator, e.g., the role of the social world in determining human character and behavior.  Students will study both areas and will be expected to master the fundamentals of each.

6.       How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

The class will study individual and collective minds, the relationships between them, and the effects of other environmental factors on both.

 

 

HNRS 206: Colloquium in Political Science

4 credits, 2 hour lecture course + 2 hour discussion, SSC, not a FYE.  Requirement in Political Science. The department recognized the former HNRS 121 as equivalent to PLSC 101for prerequisite purposes and will recognize this class the same way.

 

Catalog description: 

An introduction of the concept of politics and the types of governments and political issues in the contemporary world, with an emphasis on the comparative study of political ideas and systems.  The class will focus on discussion and students will have an opportunity to study one or more areas in depth.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

Introduces the student to the discipline of political science and to the basic issues it investigates and the methods it uses.

 

GUR content:

5.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

X

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

6.       In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

This class will introduce the student to a wide variety of governing systems, e.g., presidential, parliamentary, single party, ideas about the scope of state and individual agency, the relationship of the individual to the collective whole.  The class will also require the student to look at a broad range of sources in gaining an understanding of modern politics and political life, and sources can include such materials as texts, films, posters, videos, and music and will require that students be able to understand them and the ways they are employed in the political process.  The class will require substantial analytical writing and project oriented work.

7.       How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

As a class that deals with political behavior, and which deals with material from a broad array of cultures and systems, it will require that students develop skills that allow them to compare and distinguish political societies from one another as well as to determine how they resemble each other. 

 

 

 

 

HNRS 211: Colloquium in Physics

4 credits, 2 hour lecture course + 2 hour lecture/lab, LSCI, not a FYE, Prereq = MATH 107 or equivalent or higher. Equivalent to PHYS 101.

 

Catalog description: 

An introduction to the basic concepts and practice of physics, including the laws of motion, conservation of energy and momentum, gravitation, electricity and magnetism, sound and light waves, radioactivity, and fission and fusion. The class includes a lab, and students will have an opportunity to study an area of interest in depth.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

Introduces the student to the basic and concepts and methods of the discipline.

GUR content:

6.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

 

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

X

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

X

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

X

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

 

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

 

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

 

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

7.       In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

The class will provide the student with an understanding of the basic interactions of physical systems, ranging from the most common everyday phenomena to more sophisticated topics such as the interaction of subatomic particles.  It will require that students observe events and effects in the natural world, and that they seek to understand the underlying laws that govern the behavior of the physical world, that they learn to analyze physical phenomena systematically and carefully, and that they learn to use laboratory apparatus to conduct experiments.  Students will learn the fundamentals of the scientific method and will learn to apply the methods of science in the laboratory.

8.       How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

The natural sciences teach students about the working of the systems of nature, and physics, the most basic of all natural sciences, imparts an understanding of the most basic processes of nature, from atomic interactions to the mechanics of large systems, e.g., the solar system.  Students will be required to master laboratory techniques and to work collaboratively on laboratory assignments.  

 

HNRS 212: Colloquium in Geology

4 credits, 2 hour lecture course + 2 hour lecture/lab, LSCI, not a FYE, Prereq = MATH 107 or equivalent or higher.  Equivalent to GEOL 101.

 

Catalog description: 

Study of the earth including its origins, petrology, volcanology, orogeny, plate tectonics, and the evolution of continents as a result of surface and subsurface processes.  The class includes a laboratory, and students will have the opportunity to study a particular area of geology in depth.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

Introduces the student to the basics of geology and to the use of the scientific method in studying the processes by which the earth was formed.  Students will acquire knowledge of the discipline and will also understand the fundamentals of laboratory work in the field.

 

GUR content:

7.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

 

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

X

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

X

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

X

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

 

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

 

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

 

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

 

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

8.       In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

Students will learn the fundamentals of geology, through both lecture and laboratory exercises, and they will be required to use not only the most straight forward kinds of evidence, e.g., pictorial evidence, but to work with common rocks and minerals, study land forms, carry out collaborative laboratory exercises, and to understand the complex processes that underlay the formation and transformation of the earth.  They will be required to use laboratory apparatus, and to apply the scientific method to the study of course materials.

9.       How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

Students will investigate course materials in a lecture setting, in the laboratory, and in the field.  They will be required to understand the processes that underlay the formation of the earth, and those that are altering it constantly.  They will learn how this science works, and how science as a method of inquiry works as well.

 

HNRS 213: Colloquium in Biology

4 credits, 2 hour lecture course + 2 hour lecture/lab, LSCI, not a FYE, Prereq = MATH 106 or equivalent or higher.

 

Catalog description:  An introduction to the study of biology, including molecular and evolutionary processes, the energetics of living systems with emphasis on photosynthesis and respiration in relation to the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and the study of the physical structure of DNA and its involvement in the information flow in the cell.  The class includes a laboratory, and students will have an opportunity to explore a specific, selected area of inquiry.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

Introduces the student to the scope, aims, and methods of biology and enlarges the student’s understanding of living organisms and systems.

 

 

GUR content:

8.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

 

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

 

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

X

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

X

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

X

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

 

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

 

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

 

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

9.       In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

Students will learn the fundamentals of biology, through both lecture and laboratory exercises, and they will be required to use not only the most straight forward kinds of evidence, e.g., material from a textbook, but to understand individual living organisms and systems of living things.  They will be required to use laboratory apparatus, and to apply the scientific method to the study of course materials.

10.   How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

Students will investigate course materials in a lecture setting, and in the laboratory, and in the field.  They will be required to understand the processes that underlay living organisms and the interrelationships among living systems.  They will learn how this science works, and how science as a method of inquiry works as well.

 

 

LBRL 283: Religion and Globalization

5 credit lecture course, ACGM, not a FYE, elective in Liberal Studies

 

Catalog description: 

283 RELIGION AND GLOBALIZATION (5)

Focus on religious responses to globalization through case studies of modern religious movements.  Case studies will be chosen to explore cultural interaction and religious change in a world shaped by technological revolutions and increased communication, information, and migration.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

“Religion and Globalization” focuses on the human responses to social change, and how religious systems have adapted to a world defined by ideological and cultural heterogeneity. The greater literal and conceptual proximity of people to each other has had sweeping effects on how individuals and groups interpret religion. At first glance, globalization would seem to undermine traditional beliefs in the “supernatural.” Contrary to predictions of “secularization,” however, religious belief has not died out. Rather, the primary effects of globalization have been to change religious experiences and understandings. This course offers an overview of some of the types of reactions global change has elicited, so as to foster students’ awareness of the changing, multicultural world they themselves live in.

 

GUR content:

9.       The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

 

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

 

10.   In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

Among the liberal arts, religious studies is especially suited to communicate the goals and objectives of the GUR program. Religious studies is comparative and interdisciplinary by nature, asking students to consider the beliefs and cultures of other groups separately and in light of their own assumptions. Also, the study of religion is both “descriptive” and “prescriptive,” encompassing humanistic and ethical reflections on topics studied.

                “Religion and Globalization” meets many of the specific learning objectives of GUR courses. Students are introduced to some of the guiding principles for the academic study of religion, such as objectivity and the scholarly interpretation of religious phenomena. Course goals include developing the critical-thinking skills required for successful functioning in our contemporary, multicultural society, and to hone capacities for clear expression in both speech and writing.

                Students will learn to analyze and interpret information through close reading of many sources. Readings used include scripture from different religious traditions, scholarly literature from several disciplines, and texts from the popular culture of subcultures studied. Students are also asked to interpret visual documentary film footage and religious iconography, and to respond to items from “material culture.” We will use quantitative and scientific reasoning in our discussions of the usefulness and limitations of survey data. Survey data can enhance understanding of historical and contemporary patterns of religious expression, but scholars are also aware of the potential for inaccuracy in surveys of religious belief and behavior. Similarly, students are introduced to relevant internet resources, in ways that help distinguish between major academic resource websites and confessionally-oriented electronic media (ie, “original sources”).

                This course seeks to foster students’ sense of agency in interpreting and responding to claims made by different stakeholders in the public debate about religion in society. It is NOT a goal of this class to impart a particular faith, nor to teach "the truth" about religion. Nonetheless, this class aims to provide an environment in which to pursue authentic, civil dialog on issues on which we, as individuals do not all agree. In so doing, we will develop skills for participating in a culturally diverse democracy. In constructively engaging “the other,” we learn to understand our own assumptions and beliefs, in the context of religious pluralism.

11.   How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

“Religion and Globalization” focuses on the human responses to social change in the modern world. Case studies focus primarily on Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East (some attention is paid to issues faced by non-Western religions in the United States), in order to present a diverse range of cultural reactions. Students will be asked to consider questions like:

How do different people interpret and express their respective religions in the modern world?

What challenges do people face in thinking about their own faith in the light of religious diversity?

What kinds of responses do religious encounters provoke?

What is the best way for different groups of people to engage, so as to retain the integrity of their own beliefs while remaining constructively engaged in a world defined by religious and cultural pluralism?

This course aims to provide students with a "toolkit" of resources for understanding the world around them. This includes a familiarity with central concepts from religious studies. It also entails a comprehension of the variety of responses different cultures have had to fundamental questions about the human condition. When possible, the curriculum is linked to content from the students' own lives, such as relevant current events or religion in the Pacific Northwest region.

 

LBRL 340- Sufism: The Islamic Mystical Tradition

4 credit lecture course, CCOM, not a FYE, Prerequisites = junior standing, Eng 101, and one course from LBRL 231,271,287,332,378, HIST 287, 406 or permission of the instructor.  Elective in BA-Humanities--History of Culture major, BA-Humanities, Religion and Culture major, BA Humanities--Elementary Ed major, Study of Religion minor, Arabic and Islamic Studies minor [proposed]. 

 

Catalog description: 

This course explores the Islamic mystical tradition, or Sufism.  For long centuries Sufism has contributed to the development of Islamic religious thought, to the global diffusion of the faith, and to the shaping of religious experiences and practices of Muslims in the Middle East, Africa and Asia.  It has also enriched the creative and aesthetic aspects of Islamic civilization, most notably music and poetry.  We will examine Sufi devotional practices and rituals, teachings of some spiritual masters, and the historical development and growth of Sufism and Sufi orders.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

This course is designed to increase course offerings on the religion of Islam and Islamic civilization.  It will add to the CGM Block A GUR courses on Islam, and will supplement elective courses for the proposed minor in Arabic and Islamic Studies, as well as electives for the BA—Humanities majors and the Study of Religion minor.

Objectives and learning outcomes:

  1. An understanding of the reasons for the emergence and development of the Sufi tradition.

  2. Knowledge of the basic doctrines, devotional practices and teachings of Sufism.

  3. A broad familiarity with some of the major Islamic mystical religious, literary, and poetic texts and an appreciation of their aesthetic value.

  4. Familiarity with the range of Sufi sensibilities and the diversity of mystical expressions in a wide array of locations in the Islamic world.

  5. A critical assessment of the various arenas of conflict between Sufis and Anti-Sufis and the reasons for such struggles.

Development of critical and analytical skills of oral expression and writing.

 

GUR content:

10.    The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

X

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

X

11.   In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

This course explores various dimensions of the Islamic mystical tradition, or Sufism, as manifested in different parts of the Muslim world past and present. It exposes students to a widespread devotional tradition in the Islamic faith and the ways by which it has contributed to the development of Islamic religious thought, to the global diffusion of the faith, and to the shaping of the religious and social experiences and practices of Muslims in the Middle East, Africa and Asia. The approach of this course is interdisciplinary, comparative and cross-cultural. We will closely and critically read and analyze a variety of Sufi texts written over the past millennium. The method of teaching and the various student assignments in the course promote the development of critical and analytical skills of oral expression and writing.

 

12.   How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

ACGM

This course focuses on the Islamic mystical tradition, or Sufism, as manifested historically in the Middle East, Africa, and South and Southeast Asia. The approach is transnational, comparative and interdisciplinary. We will read a variety of Sufi texts written by Muslim mystics in diverse cultural contexts. It will expose students to a major tradition of Muslim devotion, significant to the lives and outlooks of hundreds of millions of people worldwide.

 

LBRL 362: Islam and Muslims in the Indian Ocean World 

4 credit lecture course, ACGM, not a FYE, Elective in BA-Humanities--History of Culture major, BA-Humanities, Religion and Culture major, BA Humanities--Elementary Ed major, Humanities minor, Arabic and Islamic Studies minor [proposed]. Prereqs = Junior status or permission of instructor.

 

Catalog description: 

Explores cross cultural contacts in the Indian Ocean world from East Africa, Arabia and the Persian Gulf to South and Southeast Asia, and the history and role of Islam and Muslims from the 14th century to the present.  Focuses on texts by or about Muslim travelers—Sufis, pilgrims, scholars, and merchants—and their creation networks, identities, and “Muslim spaces”, to show that some aspects of globalization have a long history in the Indian Ocean.

 

Rationale/goals for course:

This course will supplement offerings in the area of Islamic Civilization.  It will add to the CGM Block A GUR courses and elective courses for the proposed minor in Arabic and Islamic Studies.

Objectives and learning outcomes:

1)       An appreciation of the types of cross-cultural exchanges and interconnections in the Indian Ocean world which cut across and transcend modern national boundaries.

2)       A critical reflection of the concept of ‘globalization’ and the ways by which the history of the Indian Ocean is useful in thinking about it.

3)       An appreciation of the role of transnational and cross-cultural Islamic networks, movements and religious, social and commercial institutions in the development of Islamic civilization and Islam as a ‘world religion’.

4)       An understanding of various notions of complex identity formation transcending ethnic and national notions of identity.

5)       Critical readings of texts relevant to cross cultural contact.

Develop skills relevant to constructing arguments, the analysis and contextualization of texts, and analytical research and critical writing.

 

GUR content:

11.    The general education program at Western is designed to develop knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, and the following academic competencies and perspectives.  Mark all the appropriate competencies that will be developed by the course being proposed.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Analyze and communicate ideas effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.

X

  • Analyze and interpret information from varied sources, including print and visual media.

X

  • Use quantitative and scientific reasoning to frame and solve problems.

 

  • Apply tools of technology, with an understanding of their uses and limitations.

 

  • Work collaboratively and manage projects to effective completion.

 

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.

X

  • Understand and assess the impacts of interactions among the individual, society, and the environment.

X

  • Recognize the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of participating in, and contributing as a citizen in, a diverse society.

X

  • Reflect on one’s own work and on the ethical dimensions of academic pursuits.

X

Integrative Learning

  • Identify and analyze complex problems.

X

  • Explore, imagine and create.

X

12.   In narrative form, explain how the different competencies marked above will be achieved/ addressed in the course.

This course explores the Indian Ocean world as an arena linking societies and civilizations stretching from East Africa to Arabia and the Persian Gulf, to South Asia and Southeast Asia. We place particular, but not exclusive, emphasis on the history and role of Islam and Muslims in the Indian Ocean and the ways by which different activities, networks and circuits created “Muslim spaces” in this vast aquatic expanse. The course historicizes aspects of the phenomenon of “globalization”, which is often taken to be a manifestation unique to our times. The approach of the course is interdisciplinary, transnational, cross-cultural and solidly comparative. Students carefully read a variety of texts in a host of literary and academic genres ranging from the fourteenth century to the present. They also write several analytical papers, a research paper and present their findings to the class.

 

13.   How will the course being proposed meet the description established in the catalog for the specific GUR category selected in the form (i.e. Humanities, SSC etc.)?  Please refer to the description in the introductory paragraph of each GUR category in the catalog, pg. 45-49.

(ACGM)

This course explores the history and cultures of African, Middle Eastern and Asian societies in the Indian Ocean area. The conceptual approach to the subject is comparative, transnational and interdisciplinary. It aspires to stimulate students to think about the world in creative and imaginative ways that transcend political boundaries, as well as national and ethnic identities. Emphasis on fluidity, connections and exchanges help transgress boundaries between peoples, countries, cultures, both physical and mental.

 


 

 

 

REQUESTS FOR GUR COURSE REVISIONS

 

LBRL 231– Revision to Credits and Description

 

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

231 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF RELIGION (4)

Examination of religious phenomena from several scholarly perspectives; mysticism, corporate and individual religion, symbolism and ritual; theories of religion.

 

231 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF RELIGION (4) (5)

 Introduction to academic study of religion: use of case studies from world religions to explore various scholarly perspectives; Examination of religious phenomena from several scholarly perspectives; mysticism, corporate and individual religion, symbolism and ritual; theories of religion.

FINAL COPY

231 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF RELIGION  (5)

 Introduction to academic study of religion: use of case studies from world religions to explore various scholarly perspectives; theories of religion.

 

REASON(S) FOR CANCELLATION OR REVISION:

This course seeks to teach theories of religious studies through case studies from world religions. The current 4-credit format limits the teaching of one or both these content areas, because fifty minutes does not allow time to fully address student questions. A longer class meeting would allow time to cover topics in depth necessary for student comprehension, as well as to respond to their broader inquiries about religious studies.

In addition, an increase in the credit hours will allow me to assign materials that are necessary for student comprehension. Currently, I have many materials listed as "REF" documents that are recommended but not required. A 5-hour format will allow the conversion of these currently optional documents to required readings.

 

 

LBRL 333 – Revision to Description

 

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

333 RELIGION IN AMERICA (5)

Prereq: junior status or permission of instructor.

Religious traditions, values and institutions in American culture; focus on character and development of American Protestantism, Roman Catholicism and Judaism; attention to contemporary issues and events; interdisciplinary perspective.

333 RELIGION IN AMERICA (5)

Prereq: junior status or permission of instructor.

Religious traditions, values and institutions in American culture; focus on character and development of American Protestantism, Roman Catholicism and Judaism; focus on pluralism; attention to contemporary issues and events; interdisciplinary perspective.

FINAL COPY

333 RELIGION IN AMERICA (5)

Prereq: junior status or permission of instructor. Religious traditions, values and institutions in American culture; focus on pluralism; attention to contemporary issues and events; interdisciplinary perspective.

REASON(S) FOR CANCELLATION OR REVISION:

While the curriculum in LBRL 333 does address Judeo-Christian traditions, it also considers religious diversity beyond Protestants, Catholics and Jews. I would like to change the catalog description in order to more accurately reflect the focus of the course as it currently is taught.

 

A/HI 275 – Revision to Description

 

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

275 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING AND CRITICAL THINKING (4)

Prereq: ENG 101. A preparatory course to develop skills in writing and analysis for art history majors. A/HI 275, 375 and 475 must be taken in order because they sequentially develop visual analysis skills.

 

275 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING AND CRITICAL THINKING (4)

Prereq: ENG 101 and 30 credits. A preparatory course to develop skills in writing and analysis for art history majors. of visual art and cultural practices. Art history majors will continue on to complete the writing series (A/Hi 375 & A/Hi 475). A/hi 275, 375 and 475 must be taken in order because they sequentially develop visual analysis skills.

 

FINAL COPY

275 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING AND CRITICAL THINKING (4)

Prereq: ENG 101 and 30 credits. A preparatory course to develop skills in writing and analysis of visual art and cultural practices. Art history majors will continue on to complete the writing series (A/Hi 375 & A/Hi 475).  

REASON(S) FOR CANCELLATION OR REVISION:

To reduce redundancy in course description, which replicates language in the revised description of the major.

 

 

Honors Program -Revision to Description

 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION

PRESENT COPY (copy from current Catalog)

CHANGE TO

    Western’s Honors Program provides a challenging opportunity for students of demonstrated achievement to realize their potential.  Freshmen and transfer students are invited into the program on the bases of results on standardized tests, academic achievement, and recommendations.  Students already enrolled at Western may enter the program on the above bases and on the recommendation of a University instructor. 

   Students in the Honors Program are eligible for Honors courses and seminars in a wide variety of subjects.  They also have the opportunity to undertake extended Honors independent study projects in their major fields.

   Students interested in the program should contact the Honors Office, College Hall 204, (360) 650-3034, for more information. 

 

Requirements for Graduation through the Honors Program

 

   Students who enter the program as freshmen must complete the General University Requirements as specified in this catalog with the following GUR courses taken through the Honors Program. GUR areas which these courses satisfy are shown in parentheses.

 

 [] Honors 103, Major Cultural Traditions I (Humanities)

 [] Honors 104, Major Cultural Traditions II (Humanities)

 [] Honors 105, Major Cultural Traditions III (ACGM)

  Or

 [] Honors 106, Major Cultural Traditions IV (BCGM)

Completion of Honors 103, 104, and 105 or 106 satisfies Block B of the Communications GUR and 8 credits of humanities and 4 credits of CGM GUR; completion of the CGM GUR requires one additional class in the an appropriate area; completion of the Humanities GUR requires an additional 4 credits from the program or other departments;

English 101 in prerequisite to Honors 105 or 106

 [] Any three additional Honors GUR courses (100 and 200 level)

 [] In addition to regular Honors classes, students may apply any of the following classes to meet this requirement:  MATH 134, MATH 135, MATH 138, CHEM 125, CHEM 126, CHEM 225

 

Honors strongly recommends that students take as much of their GUR work as possible through the program.

 

 [] Two Honors Seminars

 []Completion of the Senior Project

 

Transfer students entering with AA degrees and Western students who have already completed their General University Requirements:

 

 [] Completion of 12 credits in Honors seminars

 [] Completion of a senior project

 

Already enrolled Western students or transfer students who enter the Honors Program prior to completions of their GURs:

 

 [] Completion of 12 credits in Honors seminars

 [] Completion of a senior project

   Students in this category are encouraged to take as much of their outstanding General University Requirements through Honors as possible.

 

Additional requirements for graduation through the Honors Program:

   A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.50 for the last 90 graded credits of University-level work.

  

    Western’s Honors Program provides a challenging opportunity for students of demonstrated achievement to realize their potential.  Freshmen and transfer students are invited into the program on the bases of results on standardized tests, academic achievement, and recommendations.  Students already enrolled at Western may enter the program on the above bases and on the recommendation of a University instructor. 

   Students in the Honors Program are eligible for Honors courses and seminars in a wide variety of subjects.  They also have the opportunity to undertake extended Honors independent study projects in their major fields.

   Students interested in the program should contact the Honors Office, College Hall 204, (360) 650-3034, for more information. 

 

Requirements for Graduation through the Honors Program

 

   Students who enter the program as freshmen must complete the General University Requirements as specified in this catalog with the following GUR courses taken through the Honors Program. GUR areas which these courses satisfy are shown in parentheses.

 

 [] Honors 103, Major Cultural Traditions I (Humanities)

 [] Honors 104, Major Cultural Traditions II (Humanities)

 [] Honors 105, Major Cultural Traditions III (ACGM)

  Or

 [] Honors 106, Major Cultural Traditions IV (BCGM)

Completion of Honors 103, 104, and 105 or 106 satisfies Block B of the Communications GUR and 8 credits of humanities and 4 credits of CGM GUR; completion of the CGM GUR requires one additional class in the an appropriate area; completion of the Humanities GUR requires an additional 4 credits from the program or other departments;

English 101 in prerequisite to Honors 105 or 106

 [] Any three additional Honors GUR courses (100 and 200 level)

 [] In addition to regular Honors classes, students may apply any of the following classes to meet this requirement:  MATH 134, MATH 135, MATH 138, CHEM 125, CHEM 126, CHEM 225

 

Honors strongly recommends that students take as much of their GUR work as possible through the program.

 

 [] Two Honors Seminars

 []Completion of the Senior Project

 

Transfer students entering with AA degrees and Western students who have already completed their General University Requirements:

 

 [] Completion of 12 credits in Honors seminars

 [] Completion of a senior project

 

Already enrolled Western students or transfer students who enter the Honors Program prior to completions of their GURs:

 

 [] Completion of 12 credits in Honors seminars

 [] Completion of a senior project

   Students in this category are encouraged to take as much of their outstanding General University Requirements through Honors as possible.

 

Additional requirements for graduation through the Honors Program:

   A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.50 for the last 90 graded credits of University-level work.

 

Western’s Honors Program allows students to combine the best of a private liberal arts college experience such as small classes, interaction with professors and other students, and the opportunity to work on research and creative activities with faculty, with the advantages of a much larger public institution, including a wide variety of majors, outstanding academic facilities, and numerous extra-curricular options.  Admission is selective, and students are invited to join the program on the bases of high school record, scores on standardized tests, a writing sample, and letters of evaluation.  Transfer students or students already enrolled in the university may enter the program on the bases of academic record, a writing sample, and the recommendation of a university or other faculty member. 

   The program is structured in a way that provides a graduated, on-going experience for students as they engage in increasingly sophisticated work while moving through Honors.  Most students join the program upon entry into Western, but there are opportunities for already enrolled and transfer students to participate in Honors.

   Students in the program are eligible for Honors courses and seminars, and have the opportunity to undertake extended Honors independent study projects in their major fields.

   Students interested in Honors should get in touch with the Honors Office, College Hall 204, (360) 650-3446, or visit the Honors website, www.wwu.edu/~honors, for more information. 

 

 Requirements for Graduation through the Honors Program

  

Freshman complete the following classes in Honors.  Classes in the first and second year apply to the student’s General University Requirements.  GUR areas that first-year classes satisfy are shown in parentheses.

 

First-Year Honors:

 

Honors 103, Major Cultural Traditions I (Humanities)

Honors 104, Major Cultural Traditions II (Humanities)

Honors 105, Major Cultural Traditions III (ACGM)

    Or

Honors 106, Major Cultural Traditions IV (BCGM)

 

Completion of Honors 103, 104, and 105 or 106, satisfies the following requirements:  8 credits in humanities, 4 credits in A or B CGM, Block B of the Communications GUR.  Completion of the Humanities GUR requires 4 additional credits in humanities classes, while satisfaction of the CGM requires on additional class in the appropriate area.  English 101 is a prerequisite to Honors 105 or 106. 

 

Freshmen with science and mathematics are encouraged to consider enrollment in the following Honors classes:  Math 134, Math 135, Math 138, Chemistry 125, Chemistry 126, and Chemistry 225.

 

Second-Year Honors:

 

Two Honors Colloquia.  Classes are at the 200 level, and a variety is offered each year in areas such as psychology, philosophy, physics (intended for non-science majors), anthropology, economics.  Classes may be applied to the GUR area indicated for each class.

 

Third-Year Honors:

 

A minimum of two Honors seminars.  Seminars are offered in a broad array of fields each year, and offerings change from year to year.  Classes are numbered 350 and above.

 

In some cases, students may apply seminars to the major or the GURs, with permission of the director or the Honors advising staff and the department concerned.

 

Fourth Year Honors:

 

Senior Project, which is concentrated work in the student’s major field, though in exceptional cases work may be done in an allied area.  It is not unusual for a student to be engaged in Senior Project work before the final year, and this is the experience of many students in the natural sciences.  Students may take Honors 490, Senior Project, as well as classes in their major department to meet this requirement.

 

Requirements for already enrolled Western students and transfer students:

 

Four Honors seminars

 

A Senior Project

 

Additional requirements for graduation through the Honors Program:

   A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.50 for the last 90 graded credits of university-level work. 

FINAL COPY:

Western’s Honors Program allows students to combine the best of a private liberal arts college experience such as small classes, interaction with professors and other students, and the opportunity to work on research and creative activities with faculty, with the advantages of a much larger public institution, including a wide variety of majors, outstanding academic facilities, and numerous extra-curricular options.  Admission is selective, and students are invited to join the program on the bases of high school record, scores on standardized tests, a writing sample, and letters of evaluation.  Transfer students or students already enrolled in the university may enter the program on the bases of academic record, a writing sample, and the recommendation of a university or other faculty member. 

   The program is structured in a way that provides a graduated, on-going experience for students as they engage in increasingly sophisticated work while moving through Honors.  Most students join the program upon entry into Western, but there are opportunities for already enrolled and transfer students to participate in Honors.

   Students in the program are eligible for Honors courses and seminars, and have the opportunity to undertake extended Honors independent study projects in their major fields.

   Students interested in Honors should get in touch with the Honors Office, College Hall 204, (360) 650-3446, or visit the Honors website, www.wwu.edu/~honors, for more information. 

 

Requirements for Graduation through the Honors Program

Freshman complete the following classes in Honors.  Classes in the first and second year apply to the student’s General University Requirements.  GUR areas that first-year classes satisfy are shown in parentheses.

 

First-Year Honors:

 

Honors 103, Major Cultural Traditions I (Humanities)

Honors 104, Major Cultural Traditions II (Humanities)

Honors 105, Major Cultural Traditions III (ACGM)

    Or

Honors 106, Major Cultural Traditions IV (BCGM)

 

Completion of Honors 103, 104, and 105 or 106, satisfies the following requirements:  8 credits in humanities, 4 credits in A or B CGM, Block B of the Communications GUR.  Completion of the Humanities GUR requires 4 additional credits in humanities classes, while satisfaction of the CGM requires on additional class in the appropriate area.  English 101 is a prerequisite to Honors 105 or 106. 

Freshmen with science and mathematics are encouraged to consider enrollment in the following Honors classes:  Math 134, Math 135, Math 138, Chemistry 125, Chemistry 126, and Chemistry 225.

 

Second-Year Honors:

 

Two Honors Colloquia.  Classes are at the 200 level, and a variety is offered each year in areas such as psychology, philosophy, physics (intended for non-science majors), anthropology, economics.  Classes may be applied to the GUR area indicated for each class.

 

Third-Year Honors:

 

A minimum of two Honors seminars.  Seminars are offered in a broad array of fields each year, and offerings change from year to year.  Classes are numbered 350 and above.

 

In some cases, students may apply seminars to the major or the GURs, with permission of the director or the Honors advising staff.

 

Fourth Year Honors:

 

Senior Project, which is concentrated work in the student’s major field, though in exceptional cases work may be done in an allied area.  It is not unusual for a student to be engaged in Senior Project work before the final year, and this is the experience of many students in the natural sciences.  Students may take Honors 490, Senior Project, as well as classes in their major department to meet this requirement.

 

Requirements for already enrolled Western students and transfer students:

 

Four Honors seminars

A Senior Project

 

Additional requirements for graduation through the Honors Program:

A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.50 for the last 90 graded credits of university-level work. 

 

RATIONALE FOR CHANGE:

The program is moving to a more structured curriculum that provides students with a discrete experience in each year.  The change is the direct result of student recommendations.  There will be no effect on financial resources.

 

IV. Adjournment

Meeting was adjourned at 5:10 pm.  Minutes submitted by Wendy Knight.

 

Present

Name

Role

Area

Voting

P

Borda, Emily

Faculty

CST

Voting

P

Grimm, Jeffrey

Faculty

CHSS (2)

Voting

P

Kennedy, Kathleen

Faculty

CHSS (1)

Voting

P

Miller, Matthew

Faculty

Woodring

Voting

P

Rinonos-Diaz, Ramon

Student

Appointed by AS

Voting

--

Rossiter, David

Faculty

Huxley

Voting

P

Tag, Sylvia

Faculty

Western Libraries

Voting

P

Takagi, Midori

Faculty

Fairhaven

Voting

--

Thorndike-Christ, Tracy

Faculty

ACC representative

Voting

--

VanderStaay, Steven

Ex Officio

VP Undergrad Education

Voting

P

Vassdal-Ellis, Elsi

Faculty

CFPA

Voting

P

Werder, Carmen

Ex Officio

Director Writing Instruction

Voting

P

Wonder, Nicholas

Faculty

CBE

Voting

P

Knight, Wendy

Recorder

Admin Asst to VPUE

Non-Voting

P

Luke, Linda

Guest

Registrar’s Office

 

P

Curley, David

Guest

Liberal Studies

 

P

Mariz, George

Guest

Honors Program