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Text Box: Approved by CUE VIA EMAIL
To ACC: 3/27/2012

 

Committee on Undergraduate Education                                                                                                  

                        Meeting Minutes

 

Date:

3/8/2012

Time:

4:00 pm

Room:

OM 340

 

CUE called to order at 4:03 pm by Co-chairs Matthew Miller and Carmen Werder. CUE minutes of 2/23/12 had been approved via email and forwarded to ACC.  There were twenty (20) persons present  (see roster).

 

Strand Proposals

Faculty who had submitted proposals for a 3-course Strand for freshmen were present to give a brief overview and take questions.  Co-chair Miller indicated that after all four strand proposers had gone over the specifics of their proposals, the membership would ask clarifying questions.  Maximum enrollment for the strands is 25 in three strands and 30-35 in one of them although classes that strand students were taking could themselves be larger.

 

Understanding Human--Environment Interactions. Grace Wang, Environmental Studies.  This strand will provide three distinct yet related ways to study how humans engage with, alter, and impact the natural world. Wang explained that the interaction between humans on earth and the impact on the environment is directed toward freshmen who may not yet have developed these connections.  In the physical geography course students will get hands on experience with a lab component and in the third course a mapping project will connect the Strand. The strand sequence will consist of the following courses:

Fall 2012 ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies & Sustainability (Dr. G. Wang) - SSC

Winter 2013 ENVS 203 Physical Geography (Dr. A. Bach) - LSC

Spring 2013 ENVS 204 Human Geography (Dr. D. Rossiter) - SSC

 

Science and Religion.  Holly Folk, Liberal Studies.   This strand guides students in exploring whether science and religion present different “value systems” and if so, what they are.  By taking coordinated courses in the academic study of religion and evolutionary biology, students will be able to practice the informing perspectives and methodologies of these respective disciplines.  This sequence will allow students to develop a deeper understanding of the important public and political conflicts between religion and science.  Above all this strand seeks to cultivate students’ active agency to respond to certain issues that are of critical importance in the modern world.  The sequence of courses:

Fall 2012:  LIBRL 231 Introduction to the Study of Religion (Dr. Rob Stoops) - HUM

Winter 2013:  FAIR 334N Topics in Evolution (Dr. John Bower, Fairhaven College)

Spring 2013:  LIBRL 297 Science and Religion in American Culture (Dr. Holly Folk)

 

Global Citizenship.  Christopher Wise, English.  What are the implications of buying an IPhone made in China? Do we have any responsibility for the fate of displaced persons in various parts of the world? How might we live responsibly in a world with dwindling resources?  Students in the Global Citizenship Strand will ask these and other questions through the three GUR courses that explore the larger question of what we can do and what we must know in order to live responsibly in a globally just world.  Student knowledge and understanding moves from the general to the particular as the study of population trends and patterns leads to an exploration of cultures and, finally, the representative narratives of authors and characters.  The sequence of courses:

Fall 2012:  SOC 221 Introduction to Population Issues (Dr. Liz Mogford)

Winter 2013:  INTL 201 Intro to Global Studies (Dr. Barbara Rofkar)

Spring 2013:  ENG 283  Introduction to Global Literatures (Dr. Christopher Wise)

 

How do you know?  Evidence and Argument  Emily Borda, Chemistry.  The main focus of this strand is on developing students’ personal views about what counts as knowledge and how knowledge is developed.  This strand aims to give students the tools to progress toward the final positions in Perry’s scheme, in which knowledge claims are appropriately problematized and considered in light of the contexts in which they were developed, but in which students have the skills to weigh different claims intelligently and eventually make intellectual commitments.  The idea of evidence and the skill of constructing reasonable arguments based on evidence is central to students’ progression toward this more sophisticated epistemological standpoint. Students learn that individuals can interpret and use evidence in different, and sometimes equally valid, ways. 

Fall 2012:   PHIL 114, Knowledge and Reality (Dr. Dennis Whitcomb)

Winter 2013:  CHEM 101  Chemical Concepts (Dr. Emily Borda)

Spring 2013:  HIST 103  US History to 1865  (Dr. Johann Neem)

 

Discussion and Questions

CUE discussed the proposals and asked questions to ensure that details related to proposing these strands as GURs are complete.  Comments included:

o   Questions about total enrollment possibilities; potential second or third year pilot linking two courses in winter quarter for scheduling flexibility and keep the third course in spring; how will a final project for strand students in a larger class be different from the rest?  How do you plan on using your development time if your proposal is approved?

o   Members also mentioned a commonality for students in the environmental strand related to Cascadia and the Sightline Institute.  Several proposers commented that it has really worked well is to have the instructors visit each other’s classes.  Wang reported that the Huxley Strand was opportune for reaching freshmen early who might be interested in majoring in Huxley College.

o   Werder asked about the value of using some shared language across the strand courses, and Wang noted that even just referencing the common strand title could be helpful.  Borda mentioned that all of the strand instructors in the Argument Strand address the 3-part nature of an argument as an “Evidence Sandwich” (a term that is similar to one used in English 101 – “citation sandwich.”)

o   Proposers agreed that a student who begins a strand and then drops out would not receive priority enrollment for the second or third course, but could still enroll if there was room.

o   CUE asked about a potential survey for Steve VanderStaay’s research on the model and the follow-up which could be articulated in the reporting requirements.  Discussion arose about the possible need for “human subject exemption” through filing a blanket exemption since we are federally funded.  However it may be necessary to submit the Human Subjects Review exemption form  regardless.  Such an expectation seemed like a lot to ask of the strand proposers, but further information will be sought.

 

Miller asked if it would be acceptable to the proposers if a confirmation of acceptance letter included the following criteria, and the faculty proposal representatives  agreed with these criteria:  If proposals are approved, a letter would explain the requirements with expectations that include a summary of the strand model (strengths/ challenges), a report about numbers of student participants in the first, second, and third course (to track retention), a description of samples of student work produced, and specific descriptions of the faculty collaboration (in planning, implementation, and assessment of learning outcomes). This information will be presented to CUE at a spring, end-of-quarter 2013 meeting.

 

MOTIONS TO APPROVE

·         Anu Singh-Cundy moved, second by Troy Abel to approve the “Human/Environmental” Strand and the “Global Citizenship Strandwhich passed unanimously.

·         Anu Singh-Cundy moved, second by Julia Sapin to approve the “Argument/Evidence” Strand with the caveat that prerequisites for Chem 101 be removed for all students.  Borda will check on this with her Chair .  The motion passed. (A change in catalog description for Chem 101 was also approved).

·         The Science/Religion Strand is in the initial stages of development, awaiting additional information and GUR course approval form (for both FAIR 314N and LIBRL 297) completion prior to approval. 

 

AGENDA SPRING QUARTER

Co-Chair Werder proposed that CUE return to working sub-groups in spring quarter to work on various agenda items based on passage of last spring’s motions based on the Communication Campaign:

ü  Gen Ed Homepage – the web presence exists but needs additional content.

Viking Landing.   CUE tentatively set the Viking Landing date in spring Quarter for May 9 from 1 to 4 pm – possible location is the Library across from the Wilson Circ desk.  However, members discussed other potential locations such as VU and perhaps even promoting it or even holding it in the dining hall . CUE recognized this as a pilot program that eventually would have to be hosted by a group other than CUE and there may be other additional ways in which the large number of freshmen can be reached and impacted.  It is important that students know and can expect that such an event happens from year to year in addition to Summerstart/Transitions where they can make sense of their GURs.

Syllabus Alignment to competencies and Audit of GUR competencies across courses (endorsed as a staged process that needs to be initiated).

GUR Teaching Award.  The eligibility criteria have to be developed if this is to go forward.

 

In addition, these items will also be part of the CUE agenda for spring:

ü  Writing Proficiency Requirement.  Review the interesting data received, revisit the entire requirement, and note the alternative WP requests.

ü  Professional Development.  Identify ways to support a GUR teaching community with practices that are most effective and have the greatest impact.

ü  April 20, guest Barbara Walvoord, Assessment consultant.  Prepare questions and discuss our assessment needs.

ü  Continuing Committee Members.  Those whose terms are ending on the committee are invited to serve again for continuity.  Term limits are 6 years or 3 consecutive 2-year terms.

ü  GUR form.  Some review of the form might be appropriate with location of boxes and assessing competencies.

 

Adjournment – 5:29 pm

Minutes submitted by Rose Marie Norton-Nader, 3-8-2012

 

CUE 2012 ROSTER

 

Present

Name

Role

Area

Term until

1

P

Borda, Emily

Faculty

CST

2012

2

P

Grimm, Jeffrey & ACC rep

Faculty

CHSS (2)

2012

3

P

Johnson, Diane

Faculty

At Large – GUR

2013

4

--

Friday, Chris

Faculty

CHSS (1)

2013

5

P

Miller, Matthew

Faculty

Woodring

2012

6

P

Arvizu, Fabiola, ASVP-Acad

Student

GUR, ASVP Acad 2011-12

2012

7

P

Abel, Troy

Faculty

Huxley

2013

8

P

Singh-Cundy, Anu

Faculty

At Large – GUR

2012

9

P

Tag, Sylvia

Faculty

Western Libraries

2012

10

       P

Larner, Dan

Faculty

Fairhaven

2012

11

       P

Sapin, Julia

Faculty

CFPA

2013

12

P

Wonder, Nicholas

Faculty

CBE

2012

13

       --

Amy Stavig, Student Representative

Student

GUR ASVP Acad 2011-2012

2012

14

P

Werder, Carmen

Ex Officio

Writing Programs

 

15

--

VanderStaay, Steven

Ex Officio

VP Undergrad Education

 

16

       --

Loudon, Tina

Ex Officio, nv

Director, Advising

 

17

      P

Purdie, John

Ex Officio, nv

Director, Residences

 

18

P

Norton-Nader, Rose Marie

Recorder, nv

Faculty Senate, ACC, UPRC

 

19

      P

Luke, Linda

Ex Officio, nv

Registrar’s Office

 

20

      P

David Brunnemer,

Perm Guest

Registrar

 

 

 

(Rep from ACC – Jeff Grimm)

 

Total present 3/8/2012

20

21

P

Maya Price, Distingusihed Student

Senate office

15 voting members: quorum= 8

 

 

Guests presenting Strand proposals:  Grace Wang, EnvStudies; Holly Folk, Liberal Studies; Chris Wise, English; Emily Borda (CUE member), Chemistry