Index of Topics –  January 9, 2006

Strategic Plan Task Force:  Preliminary draft of mission statement

Western Foundation: Stephanie Bowers, Vice President, presentation

 

WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

FACULTY SENATE MINUTES

Regular Meeting – January 9, 2006

 

Bill Lyne, President called the 2005-2006 Faculty Senate to order at 4:06 p.m.  Twenty-nine (29) people were present, including twenty-four (24) Senators, three (3) ex officio members, one (1) recorder, and one (1) guest (See attached roster). 

 

Approval of Minutes of November 21, 2005

Senators approved the minutes of November 21, 2005 as written. 

Items from the Chair

President Lyne reported on several matters: 

Ø A report from the ad hoc committee on administrative review will be reviewed at the Executive Council, and presented at the next Senate meeting;

Ø A web link to a “Voter’s Guide” on collective bargaining will be mailed to the faculty as soon as the guide is posted on the Senate website; two General Faculty Assemblies on collective bargaining are planned for Monday, January 30th, and Thursday, January 26th at 4 p.m., location TBA (SL150 both days).

Items from the Administration

President Morse reported: 

o   Progress on an equity and compression study by a committee of which both the Senate President and Vice President are members;

o   Creation of a permanent policy review committee.  The first step here will be to set up a procedure in which the policies will be put into some kind of standard written format.  The committee will be permanent with faculty membership.   Morse will work with the Senate on the membership.  Morse expects that recommendations and review of policies will improve communication.

o   Establishment of a pilot project to cover moving expenses which are no longer funded by the legislature.  In this case Department and Division moving expenses have been associated with minor works appropriations, but the legislature in its 2004-05 session could not continue this.  Potentially this can be a problem for departments, which should not be expected to provide money before capital appropriations have been made.  These expenses will be covered through the pilot project Morse is establishing. Morse will review the project at the end of this year, and may ask PPRC to provide a permanent line item in the budget.

 

Provost Bodman distributed a preliminary draft of a vision and mission statement currently developed by the Strategic Planning Task Force with co-chair Jeff Newcomer.  Text of the paragraphs follows:

“D  R  A  F  T

  VISION

  Western Washington University will be a premier comprehensive University and a national model in integrating a collaborative learning environment with the processes of discovery and application of scholarship.

  MISSION"The Western Experience"

  We are committed to achieving excellence in fulfilling our public missions of teaching and scholarship.  As a faculty, staff, administrators and students, we form a diverse learning community, involving all members in scholarly discourse, interactive learning, reflection, and civic engagement.  We maintain an intimate teaching and learning environment of the highest quality for all undergraduate and graduate students, fostering individual inquisitiveness, creativity, leadership, effective citizenship and social responsibility, and instilling a life-long passion for learning.  We provide diverse opportunities, promote the highest quality scholarly and creative work in all areas, and apply that scholarship in the regional, national and global communities.  We provide a top quality residential environment that complements the learning community on a safe, sustainable and attractive campus.  By bringing an increasingly diverse and talented student body together with an increasingly diverse and talented faculty and staff along with community partners, we serve the needs of the state and create an integrated and distinctive Western experience.”

  -- 1/5/06

Comprehensive draft language will be ready for review by the University Planning council and the campus within the next two months.

AGENDA - ACTION ITEMS

Reading of Standing Committee Minutes (Exhibit B):   

The following minutes were reviewed and accepted by the Senate

Academic Coordinating Commission, 11/15/05

Senators took note that the ACC had approved the Fairhaven College name change to “Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies”, and raised some questions regarding “interdisciplinarity” before accepting the motion.  Senators asked about the Biology sequence and the 08-09 sunset clause and learned that the idea

is to look more closely at entrance and exit requirements in the majors, to make sure they are not unreasonably higher than general university standards, which can cause students to orbit around their chosen majors. Some Senators suggested that the inevitable ravages of grade inflation may cause departments to raise standards unreasonably high.  Further discussion of grade inflation is on the ACC agenda this year.

 

WESTERN FOUNDATION:  Stephanie Bowers, Vice President, University Advancement

Stephanie Bowers enumerated the role and accomplishments of the Western Foundation.  Bowers presented power point questions and answers as a way of learning about the Foundation: 

o   The mission of the Foundation is to generate private support for the benefit of WWU, to manage the funds raised by the Foundation, and to build linkages between the university and the private sector.

o   The total assets of the Foundation are  $36 Million

o   Nearly 80% of the Endowment is designated for Scholarships

o   The Foundation staff consists of 35 executives who volunteer as members of the Board of Directors, 20 staff members, 10,000 donors, and 800 president’s club members

o   The Foundation obtains its assets through the Annual Fund, Endowments, Estate Gifts, Fundraising Priorities, Budget and Fees.

o   The Foundation raises funds via a Phonathon: We hire 50 students per quarter from 250 applications, who make 3,000 calls per night.  They reach 48% of 70,000  prospects and raised $454,000 in 2005

o    This is a donor-centered fundraising philosophy

          The first “ask” of all alumni is to contribute to their academic program, or where they gave last.

          Highest pledge rates last year were to:

        Manufacturing Management (45%);  Physics (43%); Journalism (37%); Chemistry (32%)

        Geology (31%)

About undesignated gifts:

          In 2005, out of $7 Million raised, less than $150,000 was unrestricted.  Some of those funds go directly to campus commitments like National Merit Scholarships.  The balance is allocated to the President and Provost. As donors are more engaged, they invest where they can see the impact.

           Microsoft Alumni – a focused campaign in Fall 2004 funded 3,000 software licenses for all academic and administrative computers on campus for newest Windows and Office.

What the staff does:

          Spends time talking to deans and faculty; Spends time talking to alumni, parents and other donors.

          Matches up interests and identify strategic partnership opportunities; Writes annual advancement plans

          Asks for gift commitments

There are more than 290 endowments at WWU

          The Foundation Board sets the allocation policy to best ensure “intergenerational equity,” i.e. students and faculty 20 years from now will benefit the same.

          Currently the payout is approximately 4.5% of the three-year rolling average.

          $20,000 is the minimum endowment.

Regarding Wills and bequest language, annuities, trusts.

          There is a Foundation Web site dedicated for people making these decisions.

          $40 TRILLION will be handed down over the next few decades…and we want to be in line.

Who determines priorities?  Deans determine annual fundraising priorities for their colleges.

          President and Provost determine university priorities, based on strategic plan and input from others.

          Historically, scholarships; over the past few years, faculty support:

          Student-faculty partnerships, travel

          Chairs, Professorships, Fellowships

          Faculty housing for recruitment and retirement

The ways that faculty can help:

          Review and contribute to your dean’s priority list.  Get to know your gift officer

          Share your good news and success stories with the alumni newsletter editor

          Provide materials (and surprises) for the phonathon callers

          Make Your Own Gift First.  Welcome guest speakers to your class occasionally

          Keep in touch with your students after they graduate.  Tell your students today about the successes of your previous students – it lets them know we expect a lifelong relationship and communications

          Host a VIP campus tour – we do them twice a month with members of the community

          Suggest names for departmental and college advisory boards, as well as the alumni and foundation boards and committees.

 

Senators discuss the presentation:

ü Foundation money does not impact the university budget as operational dollars.  The moneys are all designated to departments who decide what the use is, generally to generate scholarship funds.  However, money raised from external sources that hires adjunct faculty for specialty courses would have had to come out of the budget.

ü Are there any plans for a major capital campaign?  No, mini campaigns only, as it costs a huge amount to launch a major capital campaign.

ü How can we help with faculty travel and student partnerships?  We can attempt to get some endowed chairs, and set up faculty housing goals. There are no long term plans for changing the way we finance the foundation; however, if we get the assets to double again in next 10 years, we could talk about some different ways of doing business. 

ü Senators asked for a printed annual report that breaks funding down by line item.  There is no annual report breakdown by department.  The library, which does not have an alumni base, is only attached to temporary fundraising efforts.

ü Generally, the percentage of alumni giving is falling across the country, and the present generation is still untested as to their philanthropy.  Graduates who are graduating now and in the next five years, may be givers because they have grandparents and parents who are philanthropic.  Scholarship recipients give at a higher proportion than regular students.

ü Who manages non-monetary collections such as gifts in kind, books to the library, sculptures?  The Board of Trustees designates the Foundation as the gift giving vehicle for Western.

ü Can you extend the donor base beyond the alumni?  “Put the bite on really rich people?”  To do so a number of things have to be in place, including resources, interest in Western, good feelings at seeing something good happen, interest in higher education. Parents are happy right now generally and giving like never before, because they have another kid at a very expensive private institution, and they see the benefits at Western:  “happy to give $1000 to the President’s Club”. 

ü Community is another area to target.  Non-parent, non-alumni community members love to see the performances, the lectures, the shows, and love being at a college town.  Wealthy people coming and buying million dollar plus houses can be another great resource which has to be reached.  Bowers realizes we need to reach the Seattle market, and become visible where more than 50% of students come from.  So there is a “Western in Seattle” subcommittee.

ü Bowers described the VIP campus tour, where we bring people on campus, find others with a common interest, with a student from admissions, meet for coffee at VU.  The tour ends up at one of the departments such as Geology, Psychology, Computer Science, Engineering tech, CBE and spends time with the Chair, faculty members, some students.

ü Bowers concluded that she and her staff are best at “one on one”, and that building relationships requires time. Nurturing process takes a while, but does pay off.  A lot of these in the corporate sector hire our students. 

ü Do you do a mail solicitation of all the alumni every year?  No, not every year.

ü What do you do to get the alumni aware of what is going on?  “Best 10 things we have done for society in the past 10 years.”  What have we done, let’s publish how we have impacted society with the top 25 discoveries.  Stephanie gives us a relatively poor grade in regard to how we communicate with our alumni.

ü One Senator recounted a time when faculty manned the phones to solicit donations rather successfully, and emphasized the camaraderie and sense of competition that made the effort successful.


 

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING

Senators and Vice President Ira Hyman planned two faculty forums to be held in January prior to the February vote on collective bargaining scheduled to take place.

Adjournment

Senators moved to adjourn at 5:47 pm. 

Written by Rose Marie Norton-Nader, Recorder, 1/9/06

                                                                                                            _______________________

                                                                                                            Lorraine Kasprisin, Secretary

 

 

Roster 2005-2006 Senate

Term

 

Senators

Area

Roll

 

2005-2006 Senate President

Bill Lyne

 

 

06

1

Bover, David, Ch, ATC 04-05

A

P

 

Vice President and Parliamentarian

 

 

06

2

Buckley, Patrick

G

P

 

Ira Hyman

 

 

06

3

Ramona Chauvin

H

Exc
 

 

 

 

07

4

 Crowder, Kyle, Library Senator

B

P
 

 

 

 

06

5

Currier, Deb (for Greg Pulver)

D

P
 

 

 

 

07

6

Daley, Chris

A

P
 

 

 

 

07

7

Fewings, David, UPC Senator

E

P
 

 

 

 

06

8

Emory, Steven

A

    P
 

Ex Officio

 

 

06

9

    Henson, Steve

E

P

1

Karen Morse, University President

P

06

10

Hodges, Hart

E

P

2

Andrew Bodman, University Provost

    P

06

11

Howard-Snyder, Frances

C

P

3

Brad Smith, Dean of Huxley, Provost’s Rep

P

06

12

Hyman, Ira, PresElect 06-07(EC)

B

P

 

 

 

06

13

Hyatt, Keith

H

P

 

Guests

 

07

14

Kasprisin, Lorraine, Secretary(EC)

H

P

1

 James Sanders, ASVP Academics

--

07

15

Laffrado, Laura, At Large(EC)

C

Exc

2

 Molly Farber, Western Front

P

07

16

Larner, Daniel

F

    P

 

 

 

07

17

Liao-Troth, Matthew

E

P

1

Legislative Liaison: Sara Singleton

--

06

18

Lyne, William, President 05-06(EC)

C

P

2

Recorder:  Rose Marie Norton-Nader

P

06

19

Madsen, Leza

I

P

 

 

 

07

20

Meehan, Michael, ACC, ATC Senator

A

P

 

Monday, January 9, 2006

 

06

21

Meyer, David

D

Exc

 

 

 

06

22

Newcomer, Jeff, Appts&Elect (EC)

A

P

 

 

 

07

23

Ousselin, Edward

C

P

 

 

 

07

24

Parris, Kristen

B

P

 

 

 

06

25

Phelan, Laurie (for Kris Slentz, Wtr Qtr)

H

P

 

Total Senators Present

24

07

26

Stewart, James, Pres. pro tem, ACC

A

P

 

Absent or Excused

(6)

06

27

Stout, Karen

C

  Exc

 

Ex Officio Present

3

07

28

Symons, Lawrence

B

Exc

 

Recorder and Legislative Liaison

1

06

29

Thompson, Roger

C

Exc

 

Guests

1

07

30

Van Boer, Bertil

D

P

 

TOTAL PRESENT

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article III.  Faculty Senate

The Faculty Senate is empowered to speak and act for the Faculty in University affairs with particular responsibility in the areas of curriculum, academic programs, Faculty salary, Faculty status, scholarly activities, and all matters relating to the welfare of Faculty, the education of students, and the academic mission of the University.

The Faculty Senate is limited to 30 voting members elected by the Faculty, and the President of the University, the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs of the University, and a college dean appointed by the Provost serving as Provost's Council representative as ex officio non-voting members.    (Faculty Handbook, page 55)