Index of Topics – November 22, 2010

         Exhibit A:  For Approval 1/10/10

Strategic Plan – MOTION to approve

 

Professional Science Masters – Deans Brad Smith and Moheb Ghali

 

Campus Consolidation – Francis Halle, Space Administration

 

Shared Governance Guidelines

 

 

WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

FACULTY SENATE MINUTES

Regular Meeting – November 22, 2010

 

Call to Order

Senate President Scott Pearce called the 2010-2011 Senate to order at 4:02 pm.  Pearce welcomed sixteen (16) Senators along with nine (9) others for a total of twenty-five (25) .  (See attached roster).

 

Items from the Faculty Senate President:

Approval of Senate Minutes:   Senators accepted the Senate minutes of November 8, 2010.

Report from Senate President Scott Pearce:

Pearce reported that

Ø Senators who wish to receive Senate packets via campus mail will have to request that since there will no longer be delivery “By Hand”.  Senators will be asked to print out their own materials for meetings; 

Ø Forums on the International Studies White Paper will be held January 11 and January 13 in SMATE 150 from 3 pm to 4 pm both days;

Ø A broad review of the Faculty Handbook will be considered for its support of academic freedom, as well as greater transparency in budget processes.  Pearce attended a conference on shared governance in Washington, D.C., and referred Senators to a free speech case, Garcetti v. Ceballos, cited there in relation to freedom in academia.

Response to previous Constituent Concerns:

Pearce provided responses to former constituent concerns as follows: 

Ø  Marie Raney will discuss Blackboard (Bb) and its pricey licensing fee in the Senate in January;  

Ø  Enforcement will begin following the distribution of fliers announcing new bicycle regulations.  Senators are concerned that irresponsible bikers are impacting everyone;

Ø  Rubber bumpers will be attached to low hanging bike racks;

Ø  There is an option for departments to purchase their own Scantrons or distribution can remain centralized.

Constituent Concerns from 11/22:

Ø  Access buttons for handicapped people do not seem to work on some buildings;

Ø  Certain athletes seem to get priority registration for classes;

Ø  Faculty should be alert to scams such as a student who asked to be excused from exams with a false note signed by the health center.  It was reported that another student never took an exam but still claimed the professor did not return it.

Ø  Steven Garfinkle, UFWW President, reported a concern from Woodring College about the appointment of an assistant dean without support of the faculty in the college. Garfinkle suggested that the position of assistant dean is not clearly defined, unlike Dean and Associate Dean.  Assistant deans may include promoted staff. 

 

ACTION ITEMS

APPROVAL OF THE REVISED STRATEGIC PLAN – Motion

Senators heard Jeff Newcomer, UPRC Chair, explain how feedback from the campus was incorporated into the latest draft of the Strategic Plan.

Senators then moved to unanimously approve the new draft which will be forwarded to the University President and the Board of Trustees.  The approved draft can be viewed centrally on the Senate website at http://www.acadweb.wwu.edu/senate .

STANDING COMMITTEE MINUTESReading and Acceptance (Exhibit B)

Committee

Date

Topic

University Planning & Resources Council

11/3/10

Review of Strategic Plan w “values”

University Planning & Resources  Council

11/10/10

Accreditation & themes (VPUE); Reports from Task Forces: Library, Music Library, STS, and STS Chargebacks

Academic Coordinating Commission

11/2/10

E-catalog

Academic Technology

11/3/10

Network security; Innovative Teaching Showcase; Camtasia

 

DISCUSSION ITEMS

Professional Science Masters’ Degree – Dean Bradley Smith and Dean Moheb Ghali.

Dean Ghali explained that a Professional Science Masters had been thought about for some time, but there is no funding and no financial commitment to such a proposal.  A “preproposal” was approved by the HEC Bd to create a new non-thesis PSM in Environmental Science that would provide an internship opportunity for a student with a company or government organization.  The preproposal was developed by faculty at Port Angeles where a program similar to Huxley’s is taught. 

Ghali mentioned that tuition covers more than the cost of additional courses and the internship does not cost anything.  Ghali added that this is not a proposal to make money but rather to serve our students who frequently end up as managers in science rather than as Ph.D. science students.  Ours would be the first in this region.

Ghali explained that a “notice of intent” went to the HEC Bd in April this year and that the Graduate Council and the provost were informed.  The HEC Bd had no objections and Ghali was to collect the data and convince them that Western has the resources to offer such a program.  If developed beyond a preproposal it will go before the Graduate Council, the ACC, the Senate, the Provost and then the HEC Bd.  Ghali is developing the market data and preparing a full proposal to ensure that the degree is the same quality and depth as the existing degree but the full proposal has not yet been seen or considered.

The Graduate Council saw a request last spring to approve a number of faculty to teach in such a program once it was approved.  While qualifications were approved the Graduate Council does not approve graduate teaching status; rather it gives permission to teach graduate programs but does not select graduate faculty.  Ghali would like graduate faculty to have his or Graduate Council approval.

Steve Garfinkle pointed out that the initial letter of intent did not go to the department. He asked:  “Did the proposal come from the department?” Ghali’s response was that different colleges have different structures for proposing.  Ghali accepts proposals from the colleges.  The HEC Bd allowance is simply to gather further data.

Chris Suczek used an example from Geology to point out a potential problem.  The department’s attempt to offer a non-thesis masters degree, with an internship instead of thesis, was successful only in the first year.  Geology dropped the degree because after the first year students tried to pick up a program without the extra work of a thesis. The department is going to have to figure out how to deal with this program and decide who will negotiate for and be responsible to assign internships. That can be a serious problem if you need internship coordinators in two colleges who may not be faculty or teaching during that time.

David Wallin suggested that the idea may have some merit but the concern was the process of moving the idea through the university; Wallin emphasized he was speaking for himself, not constituents. Wallin suggested that the Dean going before Graduate Council implied discussion of the program within Huxley with input from faculty.  Wallin claimed that departments heard this for the first time on November 1st whereas instructors on the peninsula were involved a year ago.  Wallin claimed that no one in Huxley College was aware of a proposal for a new professional master’s degree in environmental science, and the views of the faculty of Huxley College could be misrepresented.  Peninsula has an undergraduate program which is a clone of the on campus program, but this preproposal was developed without input from the Huxley College faculty.  Wallin’s department voted unanimously to reject the program when it was heard about in November; they indicated that in principle they are not opposed to a professional science masters in environmental science or environmental management. Rather, the most important part of a graduate program is that it should first be developed on campus so that the bugs can be worked out of the system.  Once it is “test driven” here on campus it might be possible to offer it later on the Peninsula.

Dean Brad Smith responded that this idea was brought forward voluntarily as a preproposal over the summer by a faculty member in Port Angeles.  Prior to that it had been an idea with no meat on it.  In October Smith gave the preproposal to the three graduate program chairs to review with the idea of looking at the whole preproposal, and after a vote the proposal was sent to the departments last week.  Smith suggested that Leo Bodensteiner, Chair of Environmental Sciences, had conducted a straw ballot which unanimously supported the concept of developing the program here on campus before we export it.  Smith said the other Chair, Tom Terich, had not had a chance to review this but may believe we can develop something here before exporting it.  Smith said he takes responsibility for any breakdown in communication between the areas but that he did not feel he could bring an idea forward unless there was something to talk about. This is a new university program and by its nature can be confusing.

Roger Anderson pointed out that the HEC Bd developed the “notice of intent” around 2001 so that programs did not have to wait until there was a full proposal, and find out this is already being done somewhere else.

Mike Mana explained that the merits of the program aside, the absence of shared governance is a big deal and a big breakdown, and it is not clear if CBE or its departments were made aware of the preproposal.  By comparison, the neuroscience program came from the bottom up with a lot more information at the faculty level, as is also the case in the AMSEC program.  The full proposal is supposed to say who will run it and sustain it so that our current pool of resources will not be thinned, or whether it has to be off campus and self-sustaining.

Steve Garfinkle pointed out the key issues that  1) Any new degree program is inherently a curricular matter.  Its proper home should begin with the faculty.  Most would agree that the discussion should start with the faculty, rather than a question of when to “bring the faculty into the discussion;” 2) Campus oversight needs to be reinforced more forcefully, especially in self-sustaining programs such as those in EESP.  3) What is the authority between campus and the curricular courses offered off-campus?  Is there appropriate department oversight in those cases where the impetus came from off campus?  EESP cannot offer courses without the approval of Graduate Council and ACC; 4)  We cannot offer a degree that did not initiate from the faculty.

Summary and Recommendations:

Ø  The idea was not initiated by faculty in the department and faculty time will be required to negotiate setting up internships;  the Graduate Council discussed this without input from Huxley faculty;

Ø  Such a program has to be first developed on campus to work out any irregularities before being offered off campus;  and there is lack of shared information on how the program will sustain itself. 

Ø  Any new degree program is inherently a curricular matter and faculty need to reinforce the need for campus oversight.  Western cannot offer a degree that did not initiate with the departmental faculty.

Senators see a need to work out guidelines and evolving protocols along with the ACC.

 

Campus Consolidation – Francis Halle.  Senators heard proposals to consolidate leased spaces back onto campus, with the end goal of saving about $600,000 a year.  Halle emphasized this as an opportune moment to take advantage of contraction and make good use of pockets of space to be found on campus. 

·         Develop map library as a shelving facility.  Inactive parts of the library collections can be moved so the active parts can be utilized at the Library for other purposes such as a learning commons. The compact storage space used temporarily behind food service area is a waste if used as a dead zone, but there is no money at present to make something out of it. 

·         Moving VING dance space on Holly Street requires CFPA to make better use of space within the Performing Arts building.  Halle hopes to use any leftover capital funds to renovate.

§  Second floor of Wilson library to be used for tutoring and made more accessible to students . The use of paint and carpet accentuates the architectural features of this room behind the Bagel Shop.

§  Discussion of the practicality of fitting the Music Collection into Wilson Library when some of the floors are short and are purposely built to house stacks.

§  Backside of 3rd floor of Old Main: Student Outreach Svcs to be moved.  Testing Center move from Old Main to 32nd Street, along with Telecommunications and Administrative Computing.  This will allow for Testing Center Capacity to be developed.  Terry Williams reported that there are various types of testing which can become self-sustaining. Disability testing will remain on campus.  Disability Resources and Financial Services can be moved back to campus along with Accounting Services and Accounts Payable.  BFA units can be placed at the front of the building to be closer to the computer folks with whom they work.  EESP, Contracts and Purchasing will stay where they are.

§  After MCL moves to Miller Hall, Human Resources can be moved back to campus to the second floor of Humanities.  The English department might get some expansion space then.

§  The underutilized space in the Commissary building is proposed for part of the costume shop.

§  Asia University can be moved to High Street Hall. Taking advantage of vacancies might not happen in a growth period.

§  The scheduling for all of this is still in a draft stage, based on lease terminations and construction completion dates.  Halle wants to be frugal in our expenditures, and make best use of existing layout. 

§  The Library Reading Room was discussed. Some lighter moveable round tables might provide opportunity to host dinner events.  The Reading Room is a kind of “sacred space” on campus and must be dealt with carefully.  At the same time it can use a gentle push into the 21st century. There needs to be a broadened conversation on what this room could be and what it should not be.  Halle showed pictures of the UBC reading room at the Chapman Learning Commons, a room significantly smaller than ours.  It was beautifully arranged with single seater club chairs and little coffee tables with reading lamps.  It provided an area of quiet study a bit like a church for self-regulating behavior.  Provost Riordan appreciated the discussion and looks forward to further ideas on what this room could become.

§  In response to a request for opinions, Kathleen Saunders thinks that the use of the Library for the Writing and Tutoring Centers was excellent, because group resources are available, students can talk with librarians, and the idea of being seen is probably not that big a deal.  The Library Reading Room is one of the favorite places in the Library and people feel they are really at a university.  With ambient noise there is no need to talk, and there is great natural lighting too.

 

Shared Governance Guidelines.  Senators reviewed a draft of guidelines for implementing shared governance in the colleges, particularly in those colleges where faculty governance does not have an embodied form.  Such a college governing body would not affect curricular or other committees already in existence.  Smaller colleges could function as a committee of the whole if they chose.  Senators suggested there should be a statement about the relationship of the college governance body to the Dean of the college. The governance bodies would provide support to Deans and be advisory to Deans.  Deans would be encouraged to seek the advice of their faculty governance bodies, with constant and ongoing dialogue in both directions.  CHSS was cited as an example where this idea functions well.  Discussion will continue next quarter.

Adjournment:  6:01 pm - November 22, 2010  – Rose Marie Norton-Nader, Recorder

 

                                                                                                            David Hartenstine, Secretary, 2010-2011

FACULTY SENATE – ROSTER 2010-2011

 

Senators whose terms end in 2011

 

 

 

1

Spencer Anthony-Cahill  SenACC

Chemistry

A

P

 

Senate President 2010-2011

2

Branko Curgus

Math

A

--

 

Scott Pearce, Liberal Studies, President

3

Chris Suczek  

Geology

A

P

 

David Meyer, Music, Vice Pres. and Parliamentarian

4

David Hartenstine, Secretary

Math

A

P

 

 

5

Michael J Mana

Psychology

B

P

 

Ex Officio

 

6

Ron Helms, (for Vicki Hsueh)

Sociology

B

P

1

Bruce Shepard, University President

--

7

Mick Cunningham

Sociology      

B

P

2

Catherine Riordan, Provost

--

8

Ryan Wasserman

Philosophy

C

P

3

Roger Gilman, Dean, Fairhaven, Provost’ Cncl

--

9

Daniel Rangel-Guerrero

M&CL

C

P

 

 

 

10

Kristin E Denham (D. Meyer)

English

AL

--

 

Past Pres, Legislative Liaison,  UFWW, ASVP

 

11

Michiko Yusa

M&CL

C

--

1

Daniel Larner, PastPres, Exec NV

P

12

Lesley Sommer ( Erin Hazard)

Music

D

--

2

Marsha Riddle Buly, LegLiaison10-11. Exec

--

13

Shawn Knabb

Economics

E

P

3

Steven Garfinkle, UFWW President, Exec

P

14

John Feodorov

Fairhaven

F

--

4

Ramon Rinonos-Diaz, ASVP-Academics

P

15

Kate Wayne, Fall Qtr (Joanne Carney)

Elem Ed

H

--

 

 

 

 

Senators whose terms end in 2012

 

Guests

16

David Bover

Comp Sci

A

P

1

Jeff Newcomer, Chair UPRC

P

17

Jackie Caplan-Auerbach

Geology

A

P

2

Roger Anderson, Chair ACC

P

18

Kathleen Saunders, ACC

Anthropology

B

P

3

Bradley Smith, Dean, Huxley College

P

19

Scott Pearce, SenPres, UPRC

Lib  Studies

C

P

4

Moheb Ghali, Dean, Graduate School

P

20

Karen Stout  

Comm

C

--

5

Christopher Cox, Dean, Libraries

P

21

Bradley Howard

Journalism

C

--

6

Francis Halle, Space Administration

P

22

Sheila Webb

Journalism

C

--

7

Linda Beckman, Dir/Div Budget, Student Affairs

P

23

Penny Hutchinson

Dance

D

--

8

Terrell Williams, Executive Director, EESP

P

24

Cynthia Camlin

Art

D

--

 

 

 

25

Mark Springer

Decision Sci

E

--

9

Rose Marie Norton-Nader, Recorder

P

26

Steve Henson, At Lg Exec

Economics

E

--

 

Ø  Senators Present

16

27

David O Wallin

Huxley

G

P

 

Ø  Absent or Excused

(14)

28

Sandra Daffron for Donald Larson

Woodring

H

--

 

Ø  Ex Officio

-

29

Chuck Lambert  Appt &E Exec

Spec. Educ

H

P

 

Ø  PPres; Leg Rep;UFWW; ASVP

3

30

Paul Piper

Libraries

I

P

 

Ø  Guests and Recorder

9

 

DATE:   November 22, 2010

 

TOTAL PRESENT:

25