Index of Topics – November 23, 2009

                    Exhibit A:  For Approval  1/11/2010

  Allied Health Initiative - Presentation

 

 

WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

FACULTY SENATE MINUTES

Regular Meeting – November 23, 2009

 

Call to Order

Daniel Larner, Faculty Senate President, called the 2009-2010 Senate to order at 4:03 pm.  Larner welcomed twenty-three (23) Senators, one (1) ex officio member, and eight others (8) for a total of thirty-two (32) people.  (See attached roster). 

 

Items from the Faculty Senate President:

Approval of Senate Minutes - Senators accepted Senate minutes of November 2, 2009. 

President Larner presented a draft charge for a graduate advisory committee.  Next quarter the Senate will debate whether or not to establish such a committee, and a possible charge. 

 

Items from the Administration

Provost Riordan reported:

·      That the smaller number of faculty who will be hired for next year does not constitute a “freeze” but rather a prioritizing of positions until we know more about budget cuts;

·      Some funds are available to meet broad diversity needs and Riordan and the Senate will seek faculty to sit on a diversity committee. Riordan hopes to bring on board committee members with a broad campus perspective.

 

Other Report Items:

Marsha Riddle Buly, Senate Legislative Liaison, urged faculty to attend a town hall meeting tonight with Senator Kevin Ranker and to use the opportunity to tell legislators that even social services can be sustained by supporting higher education.  Faculty are urged to sign up for Senator Ranker’s newsletter. 

·         Riddle Buly reported that the Union Presidents, the Council of Faculty Representatives, the Council of Presidents and Student representatives are preparing a strong joint statement for the legislature.

·         Riddle Buly confirmed that Bill Lyne was instrumental in getting the tuition study tabled at the HEC Bd.  The tuition study’s price tag discourages low income students from participating even if aid packages and scholarships are available; the Provost will study ways to develop direct tuition support.

 

Ramon Rinonos-Diaz, Associated Students Vice President, Academics, reported the following:

·         Students are seeking additional ways to offset energy use on campus using the green energy fees;

·         Students are urged to register by December 11 for Student Lobby Day in Olympia on January 17.  For further information email ASVP.gov@wwu.edu

 

Steven Garfinkle, UFWW President,  reported that on December 3rd four university presidents, four union presidents and four student body presidents will present a united front in Olympia and will buy breakfast for legislators at 7 a.m.; the first-time effort is expected to impact legislators’ views on higher education needs.

 

Agenda Items: 

Presentation on the Allied Health Initiative: Kleinknecht, Knutzen, Mathers-Schmidt

Senators heard a presentation on the Allied Health Initiative by Ronald Kleinknecht, Kathy Knutzen, and Barbara Mathers-Schmidt.  The initiative illustrates a potential consortium partnering with community colleges, technical, and 4-year colleges as well as the broader community to address shortages in high demand areas such as nursing, physical therapy, speech pathology and audiology.  Such a partnership hopes to attract State and Federal funding.

 

Ron Kleinknecht spoke about how student’s interest in science has grown over time, and health areas showed the strongest increases, corresponding with national trends. 

·      Severe shortages exist in this community and nationally as increasing numbers of the aging require more healthcare professionals.  Our local health community encourages us to produce, train and educate people in these areas.  The HEC Board has designated healthcare as a high demand area. Healthcare training is not new to Western; we have a history of training and supplying health care workers in the community.

 

Kleinknecht mentioned that Communication Sciences and Disorders has an excellent M.A. program in speech pathology and until recently audiology.  Community Health is a very popular and viable program at the B.A. level.  The Kinesiology program launches students into professions such as pre-med, nursing, physicians’ assistants, etc. and prepares them for graduate training. Students often leave the State because we do not have the training available. This proposal enhances some programs that we already have, and addresses five programs in the white paper:  1) Clinical doctorates in Physical Therapy and 2) Audiology; 3) Nursing at the B.A. and 4) M.A. level, and 5) Public/Community Global Health program.

 

Barbara Mathers-Schmidt continued that some of this proposal may create new programs, but Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) already exists and is happily settled. 

·      The clinic in the new building serves over 100 patients a week.  Until 2005 we had graduate programs in both audiology and speech pathology, but in 2007 the new degree became the clinical doctorate.  We put our program in moratorium because it no longer provided the credentials to practice, but we know we have the curriculum ready with some alteration to offer this very high demand field. 

·      This career will grow by about 10% until 2018.  U of W has this program, the only one in the State, and it takes only ten students per year from 85 applicants.

 

Kathy Knutzen continued that she has been advising students with Allied health interest at WWU for 35 years, and is the campus advisor for physical therapy, pre-nursing, and pre-chiropractics.  Knutzen tracks student interest [in student affairs] in health careers, and noted that what used to be 300-400 increased to over 750 last year.  There is additional interest from transfer students.  The potential of linkup with the community college and local medical community shows that it is time to bring local health professions to Western.  We know we’re facing a nursing shortage nationally; there are 300,000 unfilled nursing positions in the nation and we are short 25,000 in the State.

·      Currently most nurses are produced in-state with an AS in nursing in the Community Colleges.  But there is pressure to move to higher education degrees, with a requirement to acquire a Bachelors degree in nursing within 5 years of graduating with the AS degree in order to get licensed.  Legislation requires a Masters in nursing if you’re a supervisor or a trainer of nurses.

·      Our proposed program serves 2 populations:  1) Students with the Associates degree in nursing can  get the BS and 2) More students provided with direct entry into nursing degrees. We see 3 to 5 students a week that want to become nurses, so there is lots of interest on campus.   The State projects we need to increase nursing output by 400 nurses a year to meet the demand in 10 years.

·      If WWU is interested in this area, the State would be very supportive, as would local Community Colleges; we would not duplicate the community college program, but supplement it and be its partner.

·      Physical therapy (PT) is Knutson’s special area of interest.  This too will experience significant growth as we age and require more physical therapists.  The entry level degree for PT has changed significantly and it is now moving toward the clinical doctorate.  The State projects to be short 80 physical therapists per year, produced at three institutions presently: U of W, EWU, and UPS.

 

Senators asked questions and offered comments:

·      Who offers 4-yr nursing programs in the State:  U of W, Seattle U, PLU, and a consortium of WSU/EWU and Gonzaga.  We used to offer a BS in nursing for students who already had a nursing degree but the program was dropped because enrollment fell off, with classes offered only during the day and there were staffing issues.

·      Who offers M.A. in Nursing in the State:  Seattle U, UW, PLU.  The Masters degree is a new phenomenon with a direct entry MS program.  This new type of degree is for those who have a degree in other areas but decide to go into nursing.  This is the program to offer here because both WWU students and others could enter.

·      Timetable for starting the program:  We would bring on a director first to start planning, bring on the faculty, then bring on the curriculum.  There would have to be some planning money associated with a possible 3-year start-up.   We don’t know in which biennium this would start.  But we are committed to bring this to the table to make decisions even if we have to wait until the economy turns around.

·      New Dollars:  Despite the tough economic times we have to believe that the State might still be willing to invest new dollars to build its health care force.  There might be State and Federal dollars available.  WCC got a $2Million Federal enhancement grant as did some other schools.  The idea is to look for new money.

·      Prestige Programs: Some of the proposed programs run into the more prestigious areas of health such as medical imaging.  U of W is creating a BS in this area which has a future of its own outside of medical school.

·      Impact on the sciences:  It could impact some of science departments but the proposal is for departments that will be created and not impacted.  All nursing students complete science classes as part of the RN and some social sciences classes are needed for the new degree.  A direct entry RN might have some effect. 

·      Audiology is a very different timeline because we already have a program and hope to have the clinical doctorate as well.  We already have the facilities, faculty, etc.  For our first year we just need a ½ time faculty to deal with accreditation issues, etc.  There is no need to take classes out of audiology program.

·      The clinical doctorate timeline:  The Masters in speech path and audiology is two years: 7-8 academic quarters. The Clinical doctorate is four years, with the last year like a medical residency with an internship.  The third year is enhanced clinical practice.  There is no dissertation.  Physical therapy is similar – it is three years with multiple clinical rotations interspersed with the largest rotation at the end. 

·      The number of faculty lines:  21 total across:  3 (Audiology);  9 and 9 (in PT and Nursing). We could start with 6-8 FTE in nursing. These programs are expensive and there is a small faculty/student ratio of 8-1. WCC is 3.5 FTE and brings in 30 students.  

·      New College: The white paper leaves open the question whether Allied Health is in a new college or folded into other ones. Differences in new programs make more sense for it to be in its own college, even though the white paper implies both are possible.  In the long run, yes. Now that it is in the developmental stages, take it as a developmental process that can fit within the current structure; a college with only one department doesn’t make much sense.  Ultimately costs are being factored in and we are certainly aware of administrators’ costs.

·      Acquiring faculty can be very difficult, particularly in nursing. We’d be looking for RN’s with Ph.D.s, and there is much competition for these.  Nursing is supplemented with large groups of adjunct faculty working part-time in the hospital and part-time teaching.  Physical therapy would be tenure track faculty with a few adjuncts. 

·      Current Science departments:  a few years ago there were 45 students in bio-chemistry,  and now there are 130.  Faculty workload has increased 2 times.  That program hasn’t had much advocacy, and it is already bursting at the seams. It is hoped that support for that program is factored in.  Nursing and PT won’t be accessing these classes.  Right now we are bringing in a capable group of students who want to pursue the medical profession.

·      Library:  Funding would also have to include library costs which are super expensive.  We don’t know where $$ is going to come from, but this fits the State’s vision of high demand.  What they do give us will be at a higher rate per student because of high demand for the career.  Just the high technology simulation could cost $35,000.  The Community College and the Hospital are very interested in sharing resources for training.  They want to partner with us and there are grants we could write for these simulations. Many labs could be shared, and it makes good sense for a community this size.

·      Humanities.  ASN and BSN students will have to take courses in Humanities and Social Sciences.  Some will come with their science classes completed, and will have to add courses in Ethics, and a number of other areas which they don’t get in the basic sciences in the first two years.  Nursing at BA level won’t require a great deal of space because we’re not doing clinical work.  Physical therapy might make sense to go to the waterfront and partner with the hospital and community college.  This program requires a synthesis.

·      Make this more public:  We ought to try to work in a consortium program that goes to the State. Our last discussion in the Senate implied the need to compare ourselves defensively against 2-year programs.  But here is a different opportunity because the need is so huge that we are not likely to be competing with other institutions. Nurses with ASN will be required to have the BA within 5 years of their licensing , with class work in areas of leadership, organizational teamwork, Psychology, and the Humanities.

 

Senators thanked the presenters for the extensive information they provided.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standing Committee Minutes – Reading and Acceptance


 

Senate Standing Committee

Date

Action

 

Academic Coordinating Commission

11/3/09

ACCEPTED

 

University Planning & Resources Council

10/28/09

ACCEPTED

Senators expressed support for recommendations in the UPRC minutes that a Capital Campaign include models such as the Sustainability Initiative.

Academic Technology Committee

10/23/09

ACCEPTED

 

Academic Technology Committee

11/4/09

ACCEPTED

 

Senate Library Committee

10/7/09

ACCEPTED

 

APPOINTMENTS AND ELECTIONS – Chuck Lambert, Appointments Officer

To Faculty Senate:  Chris Sandvig, Decision Sciences, for Mark Springer, Wtr Qtr.    Cold Beverage Committee (on contracts) Kathleen Young, Anthropology; Babafemi Akinrinade, Fairhaven, Paul Bingham, Communication

Adjournment: 

Senators adjourned at 5:46 pm.

Rose Marie Norton-Nader, Recorder, 11-23-09                                                                                                                                                                                                                  __________________________

                                                                                                Karen Stout, Secretary 2009-10

FACULTY SENATE ROSTER 2009-2011

 

Faculty Senators whose terms end in 2011

 

 

Senate President 2009-2010

 

1

Spencer Anthony-Cahill  SenACC

Chemistry

A

P

 

Daniel Larner, Fairhaven

 

2

Branko Curgus

Math

A

--

 

Past President

 

3

Chris Suczek   ATC

Geology

A

P

 

Matthew Liao-Troth

 

4

David Hartenstine

Math

A

P

 

 

 

5

Michael J Mana

Psychology

B

P

 

Ex Officio

 

6

Vicki Hsueh

Political Sci

B

P

1

Bruce Shepard, University President

--

7

Mick Cunningham

Sociology      

B

P

2

Catherine Riordan, Provost

P

8

Ryan Wasserman

Philosophy

C

P

3

Roger Gilman, Provost’s Council

--

9

Daniel Rangel-Guerrero

M&CL

C

P

 

 

 

10

Kristin E Denham

English

C

P

 

Past Pres, Legislative Liaison,  UFWW, ASVP

 

11

Michiko Yusa   At-Large Exec

M&CL

C

P

1

Matthew Liao-Troth, Senate Pres 2008-09

P

12

Erin Hazard

Art

D

P

2

Marsha Riddle Buly, Legislative Liaison 09-10

P

13

Shawn Knabb   Sen Libraries

Economics

E

--

3

Steven Garfinkle, President, UFWW

P

14

John Feodorov

Fairhaven

F

--

4

Ramon Rinonos-Diaz, ASVP-Academics

P

15

Joanne Carney

Elem Ed

H

P

 

 

 

 

Faculty Senators whose terms will end in 2010

 

 

Guests, Recorder

 

16

Roger Anderson  ACC to UPRC

Biology

A

--

1

Kathy Knutzen, CHSS

P

17

James Hearne   VChair ACC

Comp Sci

A

P

2

Barbara Mathers-Schmidt, CHSS

P

18

Robert Marshall

Anthropology

B

P

3

Ron Kleinknecht, CHSS (retired)

P

19

Scott Pearce  VP & Parl, UPRC

Lib  Studies

C

P

 

 

 

20

Karen Stout   Secretary Exec

Comm

C

P

 

 

 

21

Diana Wright

History

C

P

 

 

 

22

David Meyer

Music

D

--

4

Rose Marie Norton-Nader, Recorder

P

23

Madge Gleeson  UPRC mem

Art

D

P

 

Senators Present

23

24

David Gilbertson

Accounting

E

P

 

Absent or Excused

(7)

25

Mark Springer

Decision Sci

E

P

 

Ex Officio

  1

26

Daniel Larner   Sen President

Fairhaven

F

P

 

Past Pres, Leg Liaison, UFWW, ASVP

  4

27

Grace Wang

Env S

G

P

 

Guests and Recorder

  4

28

Mary Lynne Derrington

Ed. Admin.

H

--

 

 

 

29

Chuck Lambert  Appt &E Exec

Spec. Educ

H

--

 

TOTAL PRESENT

32

30

Elizabeth Stephen

Libraries

 I

P

 

Date:  November 23, 2009