Index of Topics – May 3, 2010

             Exhibit A:  Approved 5/17/2010

Presentations:  Steve Swan, Brent Carbajal, John Lawson

 

Senate Library Committee charge – revised

 

 

WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

FACULTY SENATE MINUTES

Regular Meeting – May 3, 2010

 

Call to Order

Senate President Daniel Larner called the 2009-2010 Senate to order at 4:02 pm.  Larner welcomed

twenty-six (26) Senators and nine (9) others for a total of thirty-seven (37) people.  (See attached roster).  

 

Items from the Faculty Senate President:

Approval of Senate Minutes - Senators amended the minutes of April 19th to add the following sentence to the discussion on page 3 under Encourage Young Faculty to Serve:  “One Senator suggested there could be negative consequences to young faculty who serve too early or too often.”  Senators then accepted the amended Senate minutes of April 19, 2010.

Report from the President: 

·         President Dan Larner reported that the Senate Agendas along with UPRC and ACC agendas are being sent out to the entire Faculty once the Senate Agenda is prepared.  Orientation for new Senators is at 3 pm on Monday, May 17th in OM340.

 

Items from the Administration:

·         President Shepard reported that 1) furlough discussions are taking place with union leaders; 2) data is forthcoming on the 100 conversations; 3) language on strategic planning ought to be more than mere window dressing; 4) UPRC’s helpful input will be considered by Deans and Vice Presidents who will share the practical budget solutions they are presently crafting.

·         Provost Riordan provided publications that represent work of faculty and staff including an art collection recognized at a recent Safeco reception and a brochure from Linda Kimball, Emeritus, who hosted government officials from Brunei, a country on the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia.

 

Other Report Items:

Legislative Liaison:  Marsha Riddle Buly, Legislative Liaison, along with Steve Garfinkle, UFWW President, are preparing a letter to thank legislators for past efforts and to encourage platforms and campaign pledges next year to provide support for the State’s baccalaureates.

UFWW President:  Steven Garfinkle, President, UFWW, announced a May 13th annual spring UFWW meeting in Artnzen 100 at 4 pm.  Nominations are open for UFWW officers and he encouraged faculty to serve.

ASVP Academics:  Ramon Rinonos-Diaz, Associated Students Vice President – Academics reported that the Green Initiative passed and students have elected seven officers to the AS Board.

Constituent Concerns

·         Some NSF proposal responses received via email are blocked by the SPAM filter;

·         Faculty can get lower travel rates if they pay ahead, but do not get reimbursed until after the trip is completed;

·         Manpower is lacking to monitor bicycle and skateboard interaction with pedestrians;

·         A “Zombie vs. Humans” game on campus is disturbing to classes;

·         Serious pedagogical discussion leading to a clearly articulated policy about credit and contact hours is required before classes can change to 5 credits.

 

PRESENTATIONS

Steve Swan, Vice President External Relations, presented Western’s branding initiative and heard faculty emphasize the importance of “intellectual challenge”.   Senators offered the following feedback since the document is not yet public:

·          Remove the comma after “leading”, and the phrase “at an intimate scale”; perhaps use “human scale” and the phrase “Western strives to”; Important to use active tense, and to include “intellectual pursuits” in the last sentence

·         A suggested ending:  “leading undergraduate university that attracts open-minded students eager to foster intellectual and personal exploration”.

·         Use fewer words, “engaging and inviting” could be combined; perhaps “engaging” could be dropped altogether since it is used in so many other places.  Use “intellectual” even if not a buzz word that a 17 year old will resonate with.

·         Remove “up close and personal”; prefer “engaging”.  Faculty agreed it is important to get on board with the branding; the university should be first and foremost about the life of the mind.  Include intellectual accomplishment; and the aspects of what we do in terms of developing intellectual characteristics – start with this at the top as our core mission.

·          In what sense can we justify the claim that we have an immersive approach?  

·         We have a sense of what the university is and this will not do violence to it; rather these are a way of engaging students and their parents and the legislature – when parents and students visit.  Impossible to encompass all that goes on here.

·         Prospective students are critically important to us, our primary audience --the subgroups we want to reach and to meet.

·         When students came last summer they asked if it would be possible not to take any math at Western, and learned that it would be possible.  One Senator suggested that a better response might be “to encourage every student that he would get a first class education in math, and in every other subject... And the university would be an opportunity to go back and take a shot at what he/she might want to learn; something perhaps missed in high school.”

·         We have to emphasize our core vision; to not do so would be an injustice.  The thought of coming to a university and being intellectually challenged is what should be conveyed to the broader public.  We want to make you work in a good way.  The challenge of ideas, the challenge of thinking, and of learning how to learn.  Don’t go too far on the “immersive and intimate contact” or you could lose the trust of the reader. 

·         For a parent this place is incredibly affordable, an incredible value.  This is liberal arts on steroids, because it is a liberal arts university – and as such is much better for professors, curriculum and faculty than a liberal arts “college”.

·         As far as “Reasons to Believe” – Senators suggested using “reasons to attend” or the whole thing sounds a bit unreal.  Here is the opportunity to seek expertise in fostering one’s own education; each student comes with a different level of interest and can go as far as he/she wishes with this opportunity.  Include faculty collaboration high on the list.  The phrase “outside the lines” is cliché.  Perhaps use something like “explore the boundaries”. 

·         Check so as not to copy text from other schools.  The word “here” is overused and can be deleted; so is “explore”.  Try to reduce the number of extra words.

·         Dan Larner thanked Swan for visiting the Senate and Swan expressed appreciation for the feedback.

 

Brent Carbajal, Dean, College of Humanities and Social Sciences reported on CHSS’s new requirements in the General Studies major, including 15 credits between declaring and graduating, articulation of a thematic purpose, a capstone 400-level writing course, and consultation with a faculty advisor. 

·         Carbajal reviewed some of the history of the General Studies major which had been housed in the Provost’s office prior to 2008 before becoming part of CHSS and two different departments provided advisors.  Carbajal is extremely indebted to the advisors.  Current there are 161 students in General Studies, the ninth largest major in CHSS and the 25th largest on campus.  PEHR, Psychology and English are larger averaging between 500 and 600 majors.  In 2009 General Studies graduated 133 majors, its first year in CHSS.  All approved courses are taught by Western faculty.

·         Karen Stout and Anna Eblen, advisors, reported that many who choose General Studies are dedicated and intelligent students at risk of not graduating due to sudden personal or family hardship.  Admittedly some students choose the major because they would bump up against a course in their chosen major they cannot get past.  The degree is not the same thing as a student-faculty designed major.  Stout spoke anecdotally that there was no one particular type of student, there is a variety; for example there is a woman who had been an education major, but had become divorced and needed to graduate and support her children.  Another had someone who died, or parents who have gone bankrupt, or some other crisis which prevents them from continuing as planned.  Some cannot pass the statistics course after several tries and must choose another major and then would have to stick around to complete the courses in that other major.  Some see that they like the courses they have taken in an interdisciplinary way so they choose General Studies; some of these do not want to design an entire major so they choose this.

·         Eblen reported they choose this major more typically later on, and have not had much advising.  They need to have somebody listen to their story, to reflect with them on what they might need to complete a general studies, and it is an important outlet to have this available to them.

·         Kathy Knutzen added that originally General Studies was developed to deal with serious “time to degree” issues we had a number of years ago.  It still serves as “Destination Graduation” for students who have left Western with just a few credits left.  All over the country, there are these place bound students and General Studies works for them. 

·          Carbajal mentioned some challenges, particularly prerequisites. General Studies majors have to complete 60 credits of upper division and in many cases have not taken the prerequisite courses.  Prerequisite requirements in some 400-level classes make them inaccessible to General Studies majors and there are plans to address this hurdle.

·         Steve Garfinkle pointed out that this sounded like a larger resource issue.  There are many more in the General Studies than indicated by the number of graduates per year.  Garfinkle concurs with adding resources to provide advising. 

·         Some General Studies majors are athletes and they declare this as a placeholder until they shift into another major.  Options for the General Studies majors are limited, and they have to take extended education, independent learning, and guided study courses.  There is a short list of upper division courses available (such as Liberal Studies, Communication) and those departments do a huge share.  Eventually we might be able to provide a General Studies in Social Science, one in Sciences, one in Business, for example.  This would not work unless you had more courses – with a thematic focus in a broad area.  ACC also needs to think about this.

·         Dan Larner thanked Carbajal for presenting the facts in an area of murky information.

 

John Lawson, Vice Provost Information Technology and CIO, reported on a recent security audit;

Lawson reported that the audit found that WWU is immature, scoring about 1.65 on 0-5 pt in terms of network security, and that we are only as strong as our weakest link.

·         Lawson reported that WEB 4 U is changing and soon everyone will be using the universal ID and the regular password.  For now the best way is to LOGIN through MyWestern.  The “PIN” will be going away.  The Library still has its own systems and is accessed through the universal LOGIN. ILIAD is completely different.

·         Regarding the ubiquitous wireless access throughout the campus, the good news in the audit is that we did not have to send out 65,000 notices that we might have shared personal information.  But there are proactive things we will have to do.  Our risks are extremely high if there is no secure network.

·         Senators asked about recent discussions about lab fees.  Is it better to have some people fund their computer upgrades partially from lab fees and department operating budgets, and others just use lab fees and then some others just use operating budgets.  Is it better to make everybody use lab fees or get away from these altogether.  How do we make it more standard?

·         Lawson responded that lab fees would not cover all. We have labs that have course fees associated with them, and we leave them in place. Current course fees cover specific areas. The remaining department and general use labs are to be replaced on this four-year cycle and be paid for by the student tech fee.  Adding other labs would make us go on a five-year cycle, and the fee committee would want to look and reduce course fees if the student tech fee was covering this.  Lawson reported that the Deans think this is a bad idea in this climate since flexibility is reduced.

·         Lawson reported that mailbox sizes would soon be increasing.

 

STANDING COMMITTEE MINUTES – Reading and Acceptance (Exhibit B)

Academic Coordinating Commission

3/30/2010

ACCEPTED.  Committee to vet university wide programs; student course evaluations

Academic Coordinating Commission

4/13/2010

ACCEPTED with amendment to p. 3:  remove “or Lecturers” from topic “FIGs Program.”   First Year Experience -S. VanderStaay. 

Use of x97s for All “temporary” courses - MOTION

University Planning & Resources Council

4/7/2010

ACCEPTED.  Capital Program Priority Criteria; Budget timeline and strategic issues

Academic Technology Committee

4/7/2010

    ACCEPTED.  Discussion: STF; wireless

 

VACANCIES REMAINING on ACC and University Standing committees:  At Least:

One (1) faculty for Graduate Council faculty (tenured or tenure track) from Areas C, E, or G; One (1) faculty for Scholastic Standing Committee (2 yr term); Two (2) faculty for Judicial Appeals Board; Three (3) faculty for Academic Grievance Board

 

Senate Library Committee Charge (First Vote):  In a first vote of two required votes, Senators passed a revised membership charge with an amendment to include a student appointed by the AS Board. (text below)

BL7.7 Senate Library Committee.  The Library Committee’s primary roles are to provide advice to the Dean of the Libraries and to provide liaison between the faculty and the university libraries. The committee will provide advice as part of the Libraries’ planning process and on matters brought to it by the Dean of the Libraries. The committee meets several times each quarter and periodically reviews Library policies, including acquisition policies. The committee assesses how those policies support the University’s academic programs and strategic goals. The committee shall work with the libraries to improve the levels of Information Literacy of students and faculty.

BL7.7.1 Membership.  The membership of the Library Committee shall be as follows:

a)   One library faculty member (2-yr term) nominated by the Library Faculty;

b)   One faculty representative from each of the College/Areas as listed below are appointed by the respective college faculty governance body (2-year staggered terms) and confirmed by the Faculty Senate:

·                           College of Humanities & Social Services;

·                           College of Sciences & Technology;

·                           College of Business & Economics;

·                           College of Fine & Performing Arts;

·                           Huxley College of the Environment;

·                           Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies;

·                           Woodring College of Education;

(c)   Additional voting members appointed annually shall include:

§ One faculty Senator, not a member of the Library Faculty

§ One student member appointed by the AS Board.

(d)  Ex officio members (non-voting) shall include:

• The Dean of the Libraries

• Director of Academic Technology and User Services;

A chairperson and vice chairperson shall be appointed by and from the membership at the first meeting Fall Quarter. Minutes of the Library Committee shall be forwarded to the Senate as soon as possible following approval by the Library Committee.

Adjournment Senators voted to adjourn at 5:59 pm.

Rose Marie Norton-Nader, Recorder, 5-3-2010

                                                                                                ___________________________

                                                                                                Karen Stout, Secretary 2009-10

FACULTY SENATE ROSTER 2009-2011

 

Faculty Senators whose terms end in 2011

 

 

Senate President 2009-2010

 

1

Spencer Anthony-Cahill  SenACC

Chemistry

A

P

 

Daniel Larner, Fairhaven

 

2

Branko Curgus

Math

A

P

 

Past President

 

3

Chris Suczek   ATC

Geology

A

P

 

Matthew Liao-Troth

 

4

David Hartenstine

Math

A

P

 

 

 

5

Michael J Mana

Psychology

B

Exc

 

Ex Officio

 

6

Vicki Hsueh

Political Sci

B

P

1

Bruce Shepard, University President

P

7

Mick Cunningham

Sociology      

B

P

2

Catherine Riordan, Provost

P

8

Ryan Wasserman

Philosophy

C

Exc

3

Roger Gilman, Provost’s Council

--

9

Daniel Rangel-Guerrero

M&CL

C

P

 

 

 

10

Kristin E Denham

English

C

P

 

Past Pres, Legislative Liaison,  UFWW, ASVP

 

11

Michiko Yusa   At-Large Exec

M&CL

C

P

1

Matthew Liao-Troth, Senate Pres 2008-09

P

12

Lesley Sommer (for Erin Hazard)

Music

D

P

2

Marsha Riddle Buly, Legislative Liaison 09-10

P

13

Shawn Knabb   Sen Libraries

Economics

E

P

3

Steven Garfinkle, President, UFWW

P

14

John Feodorov

Fairhaven

F

P

4

Ramon Rinonos-Diaz, ASVP-Academics

P

15

Joanne Carney

Elem Ed

H

P

 

 

 

 

Senators whose terms end in 2010

 

Recorder, Guests and Totals

16

Roger Anderson  ACC to UPRC

Biology

A

P

1

Jackie Caplan-Auerbach, Geology

P

17

James Hearne   VChair ACC

Comp Sci

A

P

2

Steve Swan, VP External Relations

P

18

Robert Marshall

Anthropology

B

P

3

Brent Carbajal, Dean, CHSS

P

19

Scott Pearce  VP & Parl, UPRC

Lib  Studies

C

P

 

Kathy Knutzen, Associate Dean, CHSS

P

20

Karen Stout   Secretary Exec

Comm

C

P

 

Anna Eblen, Communication

P

21

Diana Wright

History

C

P

 

John Lawson, VProvost Info Techn & CIO

P

22

David Meyer

Music

D

P

 

 

 

23

Madge Gleeson  UPRC mem

Art

D

P

4

Rose Marie Norton-Nader, Recorder

P

24

David Gilbertson

Accounting

E

---

 

 

 

25

Mark Springer

Decision Sci

E

P

 

 

 

26

Daniel Larner   Sen President

Fairhaven

F

P

 

Senators Present

26

27

Grace Wang

Env S

G

P

 

Absent or Excused

(4)

28

Mary Lynne Derrington

Ed. Admin.

H

Exc

 

Ex Officio

2

29

Chuck Lambert  Appt &E Exec

Spec. Educ

H

P

 

Past Pres, Leg Liaison, UFWW, ASVP

4

30

Elizabeth Stephen

Libraries

 I

P

 

Guests and Recorder

7

 

DATE:  May 3, 2010

 

TOTAL PRESENT

39