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WWU / Fairhaven College of Interdiscipinary Studies

Fall 2011 Courses: 400 Level

43573 | 403A Core: Advanced Seminar

Helling (4 credits)

Materials fee: $14.49

Prereqs: Required by all Fairhaven students. Senior status. Must be taken in final quarter at Western.

 

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life"

 

This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education.

 

Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

 

Texts: Varies by section

 

Credit/Evaluation: Active, informed participation in class discussion and excellent class attendance; supportive collaboration with your classmates in the writing process; timely completion of assignments; a final presentation of significant aspects of your educational experience; and a final draft of your Summary and Evaluation, approved and signed by your concentration chair (or by your advisor for majors or upside

 

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43599 | 403A Core: Advanced Seminar

Feodorov (4 credits)

Materials fee: $14.49

Prereqs: Required by all Fairhaven students. Senior status. Must be taken in final quarter at Western.

 

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life"

 

This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education.

 

Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

 

Texts: Varies by section

 

Credit/Evaluation: Active, informed participation in class discussion and excellent class attendance; supportive collaboration with your classmates in the writing process; timely completion of assignments; a final presentation of significant aspects of your educational experience; and a final draft of your Summary and Evaluation, approved and signed by your concentration chair (or by your advisor for majors or upside-down students.).

 

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41864 | 454y Scriptwriting Workshop II

Larner (4 credits)

Materials fee: $6.61

Prereqs: FAIR 354V; previous 200-level work in scriptwriting any medium, or instructor permission

 

The workshop is a collaborative, supportive group experience. Students are expected to comment on, support, and participate in the work of their fellow students in the workshop. Initial exercises and rewriting work will be followed by intensive work on each student's individual project. Students are expected to complete at least the equivalent of a longer one-act play (30-60 minutes in length), and are strongly encouraged to tackle part or the whole of a full- length work. The particular goal for each 454y student will be individually negotiated with the instructor early in the quarter. We may also read a published play or screenplay and discuss it together, as well as attend at least one production or film showing during the term.

 

Emphasis will be placed on acquiring a sharp, critical sense of dramatic action, on developing strong technique for the stage, screen, or radio, and on completing the script and bringing it through a complete revision. If time remains, students will be urged to get their scripts ready for production--screenplays for video production and showcasing here on campus, and/or through the Projections Film Festival in Bellingham, and through film and video festivals in Seattle; stage plays for production here at Fairhaven, and/or at the New Playwrights Theatre or Student Theatre Productions in the Theatre Arts Department, at iDiOM Theatre in Bellingham, at the Bellingham One Act Theatre (BOAT) Festival at the Bellingham Theatre Guild, and at new play festivals in Seattle, at Northwest Playwrights Alliance events, and other venues; and radio plays for production at KUGS. There will also be discussion and resources available for marketing scripts to theatres and film producers.

 

454y students are expected to make substantial critical contributions to the work the class, to offer leadership in discussion, and to reflect an advanced understanding of our texts, and our dramatic material and its workings.

 

Texts: Jeffrey Sweet, Solving Your Script; Robert McKee, Story. Syd Field, Screenplay: the Foundations of Screenwriting, may be used, and a play and/or a screenplay, TBA, may be required, as may attendance at selected film screenings and/or theatre productions.

 

Credit/Evaluation: In addition to providing leadership in class discussion, and in doing and staging the exercises, 454 students will be responsible for finishing the project individually negotiated with the instructor. Minimum requirement: one act play or it's equivalent in another medium, 30-60 minutes in length. Work must be brought to class regularly and shared with the group. A portfolio of selected writings done during the term will be due at the end of the course. Unfailing, dependable attendance; completion of assigned readings; progressively better informed, responsive and constructive participation in the workshop; and steady effort in rewriting and revising are required for credit. Writing will be evaluated for improvement in technique and style, its aptness for the stage or screen (or appropriate medium), and the overall development of the writer during the term.

 

 

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