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WWU / Fairhaven College of Interdiscipinary Studies

Spring 2013 Courses: 300 Level

21379 | 303A Core: Interdisciplinary Concentration Seminar

Eaton (5 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $7.20

Prerequisites: Fair 101a, 201a, 203a and 305a. Required of students in the Interdisciplinary Concentration

Note: If you began at Fairhaven during Summer quarter and did not take 101a, contact Kathy Johnson for an override.

Note: Required of all students pursuing the Interdisciplinary Concentration as their major. The Concentration Proposal must be completed and filed at least three quarters before graduation.

 

This seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary self-designed concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. While your Concentration Committee must finally approve your proposal, you will work collaboratively in small groups, meeting with each other weekly, and meeting with the instructor individually in order to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals.

Here are some of the questions we will examine through this process:

- What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved?

- What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree?

- How can your intentions be given effective shape and form?

- Who should be on your committee?

- How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually?

- What are the best vehicles for your learning?

- What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration?

 

Text: Handbook provided.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Work steadily on your proposal, meet regularly with your group, contribute to the development of your group members' proposals, work cooperatively, prompt attendance to all meetings. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

 

 

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21380 | 305A Writing and Transition Conference

McClure (3 credits)

 

Prereqs: FAIR 101a and FAIR 201a; Admission to Fairhaven College

 

The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students. Your WRITING PORTFOLIO will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by two Fairhaven faculty, including your advisor. Your TRANSITION CONFERENCE is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them.

 

This is not a class, however YOU MUST ATTEND ONE OF THE FOLLOWING ORIENTATION MEETINGS: Tuesday, April 9, 3:00 p.m. or Wednesday, April 10, 11:00 a.m. (meeting location will be sent via email to registered students and posted at Fairhaven College).

 

In order to receive credit for FAIR305a you must:

1)Submit your Writing Portfolio & 2 copies of green Writing Portfolio Evaluation Form to Jackie McClure by Wednesday, October 17. Writing Portfolios must follow the format outlined on the green Writing Portfolio Instructions and Evaluation Form (available on the FAIR 305a blackboard and in the Fairhaven College Office.)

2)Schedule and conduct your Transition Conference and write your Transition Conference statement and submit it to all conference participants. Consult your faculty advisor and the yellow Transition Conference form for details.

3)After your Transition Conference, submit your Transition Conference form to Jackie McClure with the signatures of all participants.

 

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22793 | 311B The American Legal System

Helling (5 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $11.00

Prerequisites: Fair 203a or Social Science GUR or permission of instructor

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

Quarter Topic: Race and Education

An in-depth look at the American legal system and how it affects individuals and society, with coverage of legal vocabulary, sources of law, the structure of the government, the Supreme Court and the judicial system. We will focus on the structure and evolving nature of the legal system, legal reasoning and the role of courts in government. Case analysis skills will be stressed, including identifying the issue, procedural history, facts, reasoning and holding of each case. We will particularly examine issues of affirmative action in school admissions to explore lines of precedent. Students will also engage in a mock trial.

 

Texts: Class Manual of case readings prepared by Instructor; LAW 101 (3d edition) by Jay M. Feinman; Additional text to be determined; Any legal dictionary (Barron's is recommended)

 

Credit/Evaluation: NO MORE THAN THREE ABSENCES WILL BE ALLOWED IF YOU WANT CREDIT FOR THIS CLASS. Active and informed class participation will be expected. Assignments will include oral presentations on Supreme Court Justices, weekly case briefs and worksheets, an 8-10 page research paper, and satisfactory participation in the mock trial.

 

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23205 | 319B Current Issues in the Law: Policing and Prisons

Thuma (4 credits)

 

Prerequisites: Fair 201a, Fair 203a and Fair 211b (now 311b)

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

The U.S. currently imprisons more of its populace than any other nation in our contemporary world. With more than two million citizens and residents behind bars, the central use of the "new war prison" in the U.S.-sponsored War on Terror, and the increased enmeshment of immigration and local law enforcement, this class will embark on a critical investigation of the historical and political origins of U.S. mass incarceration. Our primary focus will be on understanding policing and imprisonment in relation to social structures of race, gender, sexuality, class, and nation, rather than solely as a response to "crime." The assigned literature draws from the fields of social and labor history, sociology, geography, critical legal studies, ethnic studies, and women's, gender, and sexuality studies. We will also engage a range of primary sources and social texts, including legal documents, films, autobiography/memoir, activist ephemera, and visual and performance art.

 

Texts: To be determined.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will be based on consistent attendance, prepared and active participation in class sessions, and quality of written work. Assignments will include biweekly reading response papers (2 pages), one co-presentation, and a critical autobiography/memoir analysis paper (5-7 pages). Prerequisites: FAIR 203 or permission of the instructor.

 

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21780 | 323G Imaginative Writing II: Outside the Box

Cornish (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $7.51

Prerequisites: Fair 222g or 222h, a course in creative writing, or permission of instructor

THIS COURSE MEETS THE HUMANITIES AND EXPRESSIVE ARTS UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

What if we could make a class -- say this one-- simply an extension of the lives we happen to be living: writings, experiences, discoveries -- all brought to some order and vividness via a set, a sequence, of meetings? Really, that is what a class is, maybe; but we usually assume that the center of the endeavor is in the course material. It is in our lives.

--William Stafford (From THE ANSWERS ARE INSIDE THE MOUNTAINS: MEDITATIONS ON THE WRITING LIFE)

 

The American artist Joseph Cornell made the city of New York his classroom: its museums, planetarium; library; birds; parks; bookstalls; drugstores. He stopped at the automat for pie and coffee. Here, he could sit and observe everything and everyone around him, and he scribbled notes about his sightings on any available piece of paper, shopping bag or napkin. His art was "found art" made by assembly and collage from what entered his life through wanderings, chance or dream. He kept extensive diaries, was part archeologist, historian, storyteller. In this class, we learn from Cornell's techniques. How do we "find" writing in our community, in our daily wanderings, in our dreams? We'll explore Bellingham's museums, cemeteries, thrift stores, markets, peoples' essays, poems, interviews, fictions. Besides creative work, each student will keep a process journal over the ten weeks of the quarter. We propose that the class itself be that "sequence of meetings" that Stafford describes, a getting-together that lends order and "vividness" to our discoveries.

 

Text: DIME STORE ALCHEMY (Charles Simic); others to be announced

 

PREREQUISITES: previous experience in creative writing at the college level or permission of instructor

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students are expected to make a commitment to our writing community, bringing with them an absolute respect for the potential of each voice - their own as well as that of others. They'll participate in the growth of those voices by: completing all writing assignments; studying all assigned readings; taking an active part in class discussions. In this class, students must also be able to work independently, as some assignments will take place outside the classroom. The nature of workshop is collaborative and supportive. Attendance is required: more than three absences and you will not receive credit for the class. Writing will include extensive journal work, personal essay; poetry, fiction, interview.

 

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22797 | 323H Elements of Style II

Tag (1 credit)

 

Prerequisites: Fair 223g or permission of instructor

 

"Grammar is a piano I play by ear, since I seem to have been out of school the year the rules were mentioned. All I know about grammar is its infinite power. To shift the structure of a sentence alters the meaning of that sentence, as definitely and inflexibly as the position of a camera alters the meaning of the object photographed. Many people know about camera angles now, but not so many know about sentences. The arrangement of words matters, and the arrangement you want can be found in the picture in your mind." - Joan Didion

 

If you are interested in exercising your sentence-writing muscles, this is the class for you. Why is it that this particular sentence is arranged as it is? Or that the words you are now reading fall into patterns just so? This is a class about sentences: how they work, where they come from, what they do, how to write them. We will explore anything about sentences we can possibly imagine. We will write short, bold sentences. We will write long sentences, sentences that unfold slowly, adding detail after detail, until somewhere in the heart of it all a kind of luminous sense of meaning emerges, as if these long sentences themselves were able to transport us to the very essence of understanding. Hopefully, everyone who takes this class will come out of it confident and experienced at writing a wide range of sentences: simple, complex, pointed, lyrical, playful, clear, sexy, honest, intellectual, delicious, precise. The class will be challenging. Be prepared to train like a runner for a marathon, like a gymnast for a difficult vault, like a curler for a well-thrown stone. Sentences matter. I hope you will join us and discover what pleasures there are in writing, imagining, studying, and exploring the fascinating lives of sentences.

 

Text: ARTFUL SENTENCES: SYNTAX AS STYLE, by Tufte

 

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance. Active participation in all in-class writing exercises and discussions. Quality and completion of weekly writing assignments. Presentation of a final Sentence Extravaganza.

 

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21781 | 330E Ethnobotany

Tuxill (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $7.13

Prerequisites: Fair 206a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

For thousands of years plants have provided humankind with food, medicine, fuel, shelter, and inspiration. This course concerns the science of Ethnobotany - the study of interactions between people and plants. We will examine the historical geography of plant use by human societies worldwide, and the many ways that botanical resources continue to contribute to our wellbeing today. Ethnobotanical perspectives on conservation, grassroots development, environmental education, and sustainable living also will be highlighted. During the course we will gain practical skills for identifying and utilizing the Pacific Northwest flora, and put our skills to work on an applied research project.

 

Texts: Jim Pojar and Andy MacKinnon, PLANTS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST COAST; Ronald J. Taylor, NORTHWEST WEEDS. Other required readings will consist of journal articles, book chapters, and essays made available electronically.

 

Credit/Evaluation: As part of the course, students will be expected to:

1) Prepare a collection of at least 20 plant specimens, including identification and documentation of uses for each plant collected.

2) Research and write a case study of ethnobotanical knowledge and its practical applications, based on either an in-depth interview or library research.

3) Give a brief class presentation about an ethnobotanically significant plant species.

4) Contribute to a collaborative class field project aimed at documenting and interpreting ethnobotanical information about the native and cultivated Northwest flora.

Regular class attendance and informed contribution to discussions is essential. Students also will be evaluated on their grasp and understanding of the themes and issues presented in the readings, including the foundations of plant identification and the ethical aspects of ethnobotanical research and plant use.

 

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22791 | 334E State Collapse and Reconstruction

Akinrinade (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $18.00

Prerequisites: Fair 203a or permission of instructor

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

This course examines the causes and consequences of State failure and collapse and related issues of anarchy, civil war and the emergence of strong non-State actors that challenge the State monopoly of violence. The course also examines the regional implications of State collapse and its impact in international security and the possibility of predicting and preventing failure or collapse. Case study countries include Afghanistan, Haiti, Somalia, Sierra Leone, and Colombia. The second half of the course explores the concept of State reconstruction and the prospects for rebuilding failed and collapsed States. It will look at the main assumptions, actors and the challenges of contemporary efforts to rebuild imploded States and will identify the determinants for success or failure of those efforts. Case study countries will focus on extant post-conflict reconstruction cases, and UN Transitional Administrations. These include Afghanistan, East Timor, Kosovo, Iraq, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Note: Student cannot receive credit for this course and either Fair 334D or Fair 334G.

 

Texts: Recommended, not required: STATE FAILURE AND STATE WEAKNESS IN A TIME OF TERROR, by Rotberg (ed.) LEASHING THE DOGS OF WAR: CONFLICT MANAGEMENT IN A DIVIDED WORLD, Crocker, Osler, & Aall, (eds.); COLLAPSED STATES: THE DISINTEGRATION AND RESTORATION OF LEGITIMATE AUTHORITY, Zartman, (ed.); HUMAN RIGHTS AND STATE COLLAPSE IN AFRICA, Akinrinade; WHEN STATES FAIL: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES, Rotberg, (ed.); THE DILEMMAS OF STATEBUILDING: CONFRONTING THE CONTRADICTIONS OF POSTWAR PEACE OPERATIONS, Paris & Sisk, (eds.); BUILDING STATES TO BUILD PEACE, Call, with Wyeth. Alternative: selected chapters from different texts; various article journals.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments.

 

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22790 | 334H Human Rights in Africa

Akinrinade (5 credits)

 

Prerequisites: Fair 203a or Fair 334c or instructor permission.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

This course examines the state and contemporary practice of human rights in Africa. It reviews efforts aimed at human rights promotion and protection, in the context of colonialism and neo-colonialism, apartheid, the authoritarianism of the post-colonial African State and recent health challenges that threaten the welfare and dignity of individual Africans. It aims to develop awareness of the varying context of human rights violations in Africa. Topics to be covered include the role of the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights; human rights and democracy; the NEPAD initiative and prospects for greater human rights protection; economic, social, and cultural rights; the public health challenge -- HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases; human rights of women, children, and other vulnerable groups (migrants, refugees, internally displaced persons); human rights and armed conflict in Africa; challenges to and future prospects for human rights in Africa. This course situates Africa in the global human rights movement and enhances understanding of human rights laws, policies, and practices.

 

Texts: (RECOMMENDED) HUMAN RIGHTS IN AFRICA: FROM THE OAU TO THE AFRICAN UNION by Murray; INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW IN AFRICA by Viljoen

 

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments.

 

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22792 | 334Q Science and Music of Natural Sounds

Bower (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $43.44

Prerequisites: Fair 206a or permission of instructor

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

Murray Schafer, a Canadian composer, coined the word "soundscape" to describe all the sounds that reach the ear from a particular environment. His book by the same name broke new ground in thinking about soundscapes, and in particular about how soundscapes have evolved and changed with the rise of humans as a dominant species. Through student-led seminars, we will consider Schafer's ideas including such topics as the physics of sound and how sound travels through the environment, how and why animals produce sound, the relationship between natural sounds and music, the history of sound, sound pollution, and whether society should consciously chose the sounds we are exposed to. In the field, we will explore Bellingham area soundscapes, recording sound from natural environments (wind, rain, birds, frogs, and other environmental sounds) and human influenced environments (farms, trains, marina sounds, downtown sounds, etc.). In the lab, students will use digital software to create a digital "soundscapes" for inclusion in a class CD. No previous recording or digital editing experience is required.

 

Texts: THE SOUNDSCAPE by Murray Schafer and other readings as assigned.

 

Credits/Evaluation: Regular attendance, participation in recording field trips, completion of the "soundscapes" audio project, leading classroom discussions and informed participation in other student-led discussions, written responses to the reading, and one major research presentation.

 

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23491 | 335B Global Inquiry

O'Murchu (4 credits)

 

Instructor: Students Rachel and Sus Arnhart under the supervision of Niall O’Murchu

Prerequisite: FAIR 201a or equivalent

 

This workshop is designed to help students consider their options for independent travel/study projects abroad. It seeks to help students achieve some clarity about why and how they want to travel and study outside of their country of origin at this point in time. One intended goal is to take the mystery out of applying for an Adventure Learning Grant. To that end, topics will include how to develop project ideas, the qualities of successful proposals and personal statements, and strategies for developing international connections. The core of the class, however, will be a series of guest speakers who will share their experiences with travel and research under a wide variety of conditions, and their thoughts about general principles for responsible global study and travel.

 

Texts: a number of articles on electronic reserve.

 

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21782 | 335N Visioning Sustainable Futures

Bornzin (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $11.45

Prerequisites: Fair 201a or Eng 101 and prior course work or experience in socio-political issues or environmental issues from a sociopolitical perspective.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

In his Foreword to the book THE IMAGE OF THE FUTURE by Fred Polak, futurist/economist Kenneth Boulding writes: "The image of the future...is the key to all choice-oriented behavior. The general character and quality of the images of the future which prevail in a society is therefore the most important clue to its overall dynamics. The individual's image of the future is likewise the most significant determinant of...personal behavior.

 

In the 21st century--as nations contend for power and resources, as individuals consume and discard, as new technologies amplify human power to kill people, annihilate species, and degrade the planet at unprecedented rates--who is stopping to ask the question: what images of the future are driving the pathological, self-destructive behavior so prevalent in today's world? And where in the public discourse are the alternative visions of a healthy, just, and sustainable future? What does such a world look like? Is such a world possible? Amid the many factors that divide humans into bickering factions of race, nationality, ethnicity, religion, politics, and power--can we, individually and collectively, begin to uncover, create, and share compelling stories and visions of a positive future that can inspire people to come together to solve the problems of our times? Can visioning healthy sustainable futures help replace fear with hope, apathy with vitality, despair with dedication? In this class we challenge one another to dream big--radical, idealistic and realistic--to transcend our habitual reliance on facile cliches, short-term remedies and technological fixes. We challenge one another to re-invent or reshape the various systems of human society, and to seek visions which respect and support the life and health of people in all their rich diversity as well as the other animals and plants that share this planet with us. Task groups within the class may focus on particular realms such as food, housing, land use, energy, health care, transportation, education, political structure, economic and legal systems, family and interpersonal relationships, relations with the rest of the world, philosophical foundations, etc., according to student interests.

 

Texts: Required: ECOTOPIA by Callenbach; WORLDCHANGING: A USER'S GUIDE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY (2011 ed.) by Steffen. Recommended (available for checkout): THRIVING BEYOND SUSTAINABILITY by Edwards; ; HANDBOOK OF SUSTAINABILITY LITERACY: SKILLS FOR A CHANGING WORLD by Stibbe, ed.; THE SUSTAINABILITY REVOLUTION: PORTRAIT OF A PARADIGM SHIFT by Edwards and Orr; ECOVILLAGE LIVING: RESTORING THE EARTH AND HER PEOPLE, by Jackson and Svensson, eds.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students are expected to attend regularly, to engage the assigned readings, to participate actively in class discussions, to think seriously about, develop, and imaginatively articulate their own visions of a sustainable future in a five to ten page paper; to participate in a task group, researching and reporting to the class some particular aspect of their future vision. Passion, commitment, openness, and a willingness to share and support others will be valuable assets in creating an exciting and visionary learning community.

 

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23252 | 336B Topics in Social Issues: Youth and Society

Ferrare (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $13.73

Prerequisites: Fair 203a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

In this course we will focus on how social structures in society influence the life chances of youth, and how youth culture and power mediate this process. The following questions will guide our inquiry:

1. What are social structures and how do they afford and constrain the lives of youth in contemporary society?

2. How do youth become empowered to challenge and contest social structures?

3.How do youth cultures mediate and complicate this process?

To examine these questions we will look to classical and contemporary thinkers and researchers from fields such as sociology, anthropology, psychology, biology, education, and philosophy. In the process, we will draw upon a variety of forms of evidence, ranging from large-scale statistical studies to in-depth ethnographic research (no prior statistical or ethnographic research experience is necessary). These works will be situated within a number of different contexts, such as education, culture, art, politics, and the economy.

 

Much of the research on youth cultural studies focuses on how youth navigate the multiple social structures that make up society. Social structures constitute both an imposing and enabling force in the lives of youth.† Depending upon one's position within them (e.g. being the oldest child in the family, or the child of manual laborers within the global economy), social structures assign a particular set of "acceptable" social actions and/or relational strategies for action. Metaphorically speaking, social structures act as the gravity of the social world by organizing daily and long term behaviors, attitudes, and actions. As a concept, though, "social structure" often takes on a vague meaning so that it is never quite clear what social structures actually are or what they do. This is due, in part, to the multiple ways in which social thinkers have invoked the term, as well as the different attempts among social scientists to measure the "effects" of social structures. Thus, while the course is primarily concerned with how social structures impact the lives of youth (particularly those at the margins), we will spend some time thinking more generally about the concept of social structure and the practical implications this concept offers to our understanding of social life.

 

Texts: The readings for this course will consist of articles and book chapters uploaded to Blackboard. The authors include Jo-Anne Dillabough, Jacqueline Kennelly, Douglas Massey, Roy DíAndrade, Dalton Conley, Jack Shonkoff, Nancy Fraser, Annette Lareau, Pierre Bourdieu, Jeff Duncan-Andrade, Paul Willis, Angela McRobbie, and many others.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students are expected to critically engage with the readings and class discussions on a regular basis, and to participate in two "synthesis workshops." In addition, there will be three formal writing assignments dispersed throughout the quarter.

 

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23255 | 336N Topics in Science: Nutrition

Schwandt (4 credits)

 

Prerequisites: Fair 206a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

In the first phase of this course we will cover the biology of nutrition and work as a learning community to answer the following questions: What happens inside our bodies when we eat food? How do our bodies break down food and use the nutrients from the food we eat for energy and growth? What types of nutrients do we need? Why does this differ by country/culture? How much of each nutrient do we need? Where does each essential vitamin and mineral come from? Why do our bodies need essential vitamins and minerals? Can vitamin or mineral supplements meet our nutritional needs as well as the naturally occurring forms?

 

In the second phase of the course we will build on our understanding of nutrition and discuss various types of malnutrition, such as: starvation, eating disorders, and obesity; as well as a variety of metabolic disorders and food allergies. In this class we will always include a discussion on the impact of diet on health with every topic covered. We will also explore inequities in nutrition - why they might exist and what types of programs have been piloted to address the inequities.

 

Texts: Books and readings TBD.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated on their attendance, preparation for and participation in course discussions. Students will work in small groups on a nutrition service learning project with a local (food bank) or international community (kitchen gardens in Rwanda). Finally, each student will work independently on a research presentation and two drafts of a research paper (3000 words) detailing a popular diet, outlining the pros and cons of the diet based on what we learn about good nutrition, as well as the demographics of the people who are drawn to the diet and who isn't and why there might be a difference between who is on the diet and who isn't. Students can chose to try the diet throughout the course to augment their knowledge of, and experience with, the diet if they choose to do so - but this is not a requirement.

 

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23367 | 336N Topics in Science: Wild Foods

Hahn (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $15.00

Prerequisite: Fair 206a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

For thousands of years the First Nations of the northwest, including the Coast Salish, ate via a "seasonal round" from the bountiful shellfish, salmon, camas, berries, seaweed, and greens they foraged and traded throughout this area. What were these foods? Where did they grow? How did they contribute to the culture and ecology of the area, as well as human health? How were they managed for sustainability? What ethics did people apply to gathering, processing and eating food?

 

In this course we will explore and study northwest wild foods across time, cultures, and ecosystems within a 100- mile range of Bellingham, Washington. Our study area will encompass the Salish Sea to the Cascade mountain crest. We will learn to identify, sustainably forage, process and prepare wild foods with a modern twist, via readings, field trips, guest speakers, hands-on projects and presentations, research, and the preparation of a feast celebrating the foods we have studied.

 

We will also look at native food culture against the backdrop of European settlement and farming. How did two cultures' Indigenous and European--interface and impact one another? What factors have contributed to the loss of Indigenous food wisdom over the last 150 years? Today, many wild foods are also threatened due to the introduction of invasive species and loss of traditional ecological knowledge of how to use these foods. How can we imagine a modern food culture that incorporates sustainable wild foods? How might the traditional ecological knowledge of indigenous people apply to how we manage our "foodshed" today?

 

Texts: Handouts, on-line papers, and the following texts: "THE EARTH'S BLANKET: Traditional Teachings for Sustainable Living" by Nancy J. Turner, University of Washington Press; "PACIFIC FEAST: A Cook's Guide to Coastal Foraging and Cuisine" by Jennifer Hahn, Mountaineers/Skipstone Press, Fall 201; FOOD PLANTS OF COASTAL FIRST PEOPLES by Nancy J. Turner, University of British Columbia Press.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students are required to participate in class discussions and have regular class attendance; to keep weekly reading journal; to participate in three (of four) field trips; research and write two 5-page papers on wild foods and complete two hands-on projects- food project (eg., gathering /processing wild plants for tea; traditional pitfire meal; gather/make food from Pacific Feast or a First Nation traditional food cookbook) and a construction project (e.g., carve traditional clam/root digging stick; steam-bent fish hook). Details on assignments will be given in class.

 

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23263 | 336N Topics in Science: Vanishing Ice

Ryan (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $ 50.00

Prerequisite: Fair 206a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

NOTE: This class includes a MANDATORY three-day fieldtrip to North Cascades Institute's Environmental Learning Center, leaving 8am on Friday April 12 and returning by 6pm on Sunday, April 14. This class will be taught by Maureen Ryan and Tom Semple.

 

Alpine and polar regions of the world have inspired artists and explorers for centuries. Among the fastest changing regions of the planet, these ice and snow-covered landscapes are now also the focus of scientific researchers seeking to understand the nature of global climate change. Through an investigation of the art and science of these dramatic landscapes, and with a focus on the alpine zone of the North Cascades, we will explore the boundaries and overlap in science and art; the creative, philosophical, and practical tensions between them; and the capacity of both to affect change. In the realm of science, we will study climate science, the ecology of alpine regions, the influence of polar & arctic systems on human society, and controversies regarding the role of science in culture. In the realm of art, we will explore the art of alpine and polar landscapes, the ways in which art has been used to foster change, and how art might be used to advance the cultural dialogue around climate change. A major portion of the course will be the development of a public art project that draws on the science of climate change, which will run in conjunction with the Vanishing Ice exhibit at the Whatcom Art Museum. Throughout the class, we will actively explore our own abilities to think creatively, build connections across disciplines, expand our tools of perception and learning, and work with change to find common ground and collective solutions.

 

Texts: Required readings will be distributed electronically. Recommended an Field Notes from a Catastrophe by Kolbert; Climate Savvy by Hansen & Hoffman; Climate Change Biology by Hannah; The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars by Mann.

 

Credit/Evaluation: 1) Class attendance and participation, including the 3-day fieldtrip (see note above), 2) Participation in a course leadership team, 3) Class presentations (one on art; one on science), 4) Completion of occasional short written assignments, 5) Completion of individual or group art project.

 

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22538 | 336V Topics in Art: Art of the Other

Feodorov (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $17.17

Prerequisites: Fair 202a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE HUMANITIES AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

Until recently, the Western World has dominated most discussions on Art and Art History, despite the existence of important artists, art movements and philosophies from around the world. Historically, these artworks were resigned to Museums of Natural History; considered unsophisticated and even primitive in comparison to Euro-American traditions. However, increasing accessibility to non-Western cultures has created greater opportunities to understand, and often misunderstand, these artworks and their cultures of origin. Questions we will tackle include: "What happens when we frame these artworks and artifacts with Western eyes?" "Is it enough to respond to them on a purely aesthetic basis or must we understand them within a specific cultural context?" 'Is Art universal, 'belonging' to everybody without regard to the original context of creation, or does Art transcend context?" "How might/does cultural hybridity challenge notions of Authenticity and Identity?"

 

This class will also explore the work of several contemporary artists from around the world, (including within the U.S.) who address and comment upon issues relating to Identity, Post-Colonialism, Cultural Hegemony and the "Western Gaze."

 

Students will be responsible for assigned readings, weekly response/reflection papers and regular participation in class discussions. In addition, students will give oral presentations on two artists whose work addresses topics discussed in class.

 

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23360 | 336V Topics in Art: Memory & Dream

Feodorov (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $22.00

Prerequisites: Fair 202a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE HUMANITIES AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

This studio art course focuses on using memory and dream imagery as the basis for creating art. Students can utilize their experience and skills through a variety of media such as drawing, painting, installation, photography and/or video. Students are encouraged to draw upon their own personal memories, as well as those involving family and community, with the goal of imbuing their art with a deeper sense of meaning for both themselves and their audience.

 

In addition, the class will explore various theories regarding Art and the Subconscious, art movements such as Symbolism, Surrealism and German Expressionism, as well as some more contemporary examples. Additionally, we will learn how several of these theories and movements were based upon policies of colonialism, oppression and cultural appropriation.

 

Students will be responsible for completing four art projects, with written artist statements for each project. Students are expected to work both within and outside of class on their projects. A required 40-page journal of notes, ideas, sketches, etc, will be turned in at the end of the quarter. Occasional required readings will be handed out and discussed as a class.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Credit is based upon REGULAR PUNCTUAL attendance, timely completion of all art projects, journals and reading assignments. Regular informed participation in class discussions and the willingness to take creative and conceptual risks are essential.

 

 

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23359 | 336V Topics in Art: Express Art

Froebe (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $17.17

Prerequisites: Fair 202a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE HUMANITIES AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

Expressive Arts: A Return to Authenticity

In times past when most cultures were not yet touched by mechanization, full access to the senses and creative expression was utterly natural and essential. Visual and embodied forms of what we now call artistic expression were connected to one another, to the soul of the individual, to the human community and to the whole of life. The archetype of the artist was an integral aspect of human identity, and artistic expression was sacramental and functional. Creative form was evoked to simply communicate, to express the transpersonal mysteries of nature and the authenticity of inner experience as well as to provide for the basic needs of the individual and the community.

 

Our innate need and capacity to create is directly related to the use of artistic expression in healing and maintaining wellness. The expressive arts utilized as healing and therapeutic modalities align with what W.B. Yeats describes as "rituals of a lost faith." Artistic expression focused on process rather than product, may reveal what is not consciously known and revive the spirit of informal ceremony, the practices of deep intuitive listening and witnessing, and the power of alchemical transformation. The guide, mentor or therapist may serve as a curative intermediary while an individual or group participates in the direct experience of knowing and giving shape to what arises in the spirit of becoming more conscious and whole.

 

In this course, students will examine a variety of expressive modalities including visual art, movement, music, creative writing and drama, with an emphasis on the imaginal realm and its relation to wellness. As a way of gaining greater understanding of expressive arts, this course will involve experiential elements and practices. Through readings, group discussion and conversations with guest presenters who employ or direct others in utilizing the arts for growth and healing, students will examine a range of expressive forms and their transformative power to be personally and collectively health promoting and spirit enhancing.† This course is not designed as a laboratory for therapeutic interventions that address the personal challenges of any individual student.

 

Texts: Texts and readings that investigate the creative process and expressive arts modalities will be selected from: Shaun McNiff, THE ARTS AND PSYCHOTHERAPY; Natalie Rogers, THE CREATIVE CONNECTION: EXPRESSIVE ARTS AS HEALING; Cathy A. Malchiodi, EXPRESSIVE THERAPIES; Pat B.Allen, ART IS A WAY OF KNOWING; Shaun McNiff, TRUST THE PROCESS: AN ARTISTíS GUIDE TO LETTING GO; Mark Pearson and Helen Wilson, USING EXPRESSIVE ARTS TO WORK WITH MIND, BODY AND EMOTIONS. Required books to be determined.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Commitment, curiosity and willingness to creatively engage and support and respect others will be invaluable assets in creating our own learning community. Consistent, punctual attendance and active, substantive participation are of highest priority in the course. Please note the class meets on 3 Fridays as well as the scheduled Wednesdays. Students will engage in active journaling using a variety of expressive forms and complete and actively reflect on assigned readings. After identifying and researching a particular modality of interest, students will work independently on a summary of findings in integration papers/projects. In partnerships or small groups, students will design a final expressive arts experience, following specific criteria, to be shared with the class.

 

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22785 | 341R Psychology of Mindfulness & Well-being

Jack (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $7.20

Prerequisites: Previous courses in psychology

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

We all face difficult experiences, guaranteed as part of being alive. In response, human beings have created a range of methods to deal with crises and negative life events. Recent research spanning disciplines as diverse as bio-behavioral medicine, the cognitive and affective neuroscience, physics and psychology have uncovered the benefits of the practice of "mindfulness," now proven through numerous studies to reduce stress and emotional suffering. In this class on the psychology of mindfulness, we will examine what mindfulness is, its relationship to well-being, its origins, and whether and how it reduces stress.

 

Mindfulness, as a method, is a means of training the mind to be keenly aware of sensory phenomena and the flow of thoughts in the present moment. It is learned through "meditation," or quieting the body to sharply focus awareness on thoughts and sensations as they arise. Though originating in Buddhist contemplative traditions, mindfulness meditation has been adopted by a number of medical schools, mental health training, and treatment programs. This adaptation has been encouraged by Buddhist scholars - including the Dalai Lama - most notably at the Mind and Life Conferences for psychologists, physicists, neurologists, and philosophers. Mindfulness meditation is being offered to prisoners by volunteers, and used in a wide variety of settings, not as a spiritual practice but as a way of fostering well-being through stress reduction. As Western psychologists are documenting through rigorous studies, mindfulness can alter brain states, attentional capacities, clarity, physiological responses, and well-being.

 

In this class, we will study what mindfulness means, focusing on results of mindfulness and how to critically appraise these results, including to examine how and whether they influence the development of empathy, health and well-being. Our methods will include the third-person approach using the scientific method, which examines stress reduction from a presumed objective position outside ourselves. First-person approaches, which study mindfulness and stress reduction from a subjective position, are also important. Can a scientific study of mind, stress and mindfulness leave out what is ever-present for humans, our own experience?

 

Students can expect to have a relaxing, yet exciting, experience in this class.

 

Texts: THE MIRACLE OF MINDFULNESS by T. N. Hanh; WHEREVER YOU GO, THERE YOU ARE: MINDFULNESS MEDITATION IN EVERYDAY LIFE by J. Kabat-Zinn; HAPPINESS: A GUIDE TO DEVELOPING LIFE'S MOST IMPORTANT SKILL by M. Ricard; TRAIN YOUR MIND, CHANGE YOUR BRAIN, by S. Begley. A series of journal articles posted on Blackboard are also required.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Informed, thoughtful participation in class discussions and regular attendance. Students' learning will be assessed through a final project, two short papers, and a journal that demonstrates engaged reading and practice.

 

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23178 | 353Y Songwriting Workshop

Eaton (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $6.89

THIS COURSE MEETS THE HUMANITIES AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

Songs have the power to entice, excite, or evoke and songwriting is a quest to find the comical or tender, the sacred or profane, the common or the singular within everyday life. Songwriters journey with an ordinary object, image or event and discover what makes it extraordinary. In the inspiration phase, we form relationships with the songs we write, whether we ever finish them, or even like them. Taking risks and being willing to explore avenues that may lead nowhere will help this relationship flourish and give you skills to engage again.

 

Crafting songs, like any other creative effort, is a combination of both inspiration and perspiration. Although there are many paths in the creative process of songwriting, most songwriters use similar tools to craft something unique and new - melody, lyric, structure, and groove. Songwriting is not just the magic and rush of the new idea. It's also a craft. Once all the ideas are down, we invite the analytical part of our brains to join the creative spirit to help refine the concept. Although crafting a song may not result in a gem every time, you can be sure that neglecting this part of the process can doom a song -- and a songwriter -- to mediocrity.

 

In this class, we will explore the tools and craft of songwriting through a series of fun (and maybe a little risky) exercises that will lead toward songs, and work together on songs that have gotten stuck between inspiration and completion. We'll discuss techniques, strategies and blocks, the roles and interrelationships of melody, rhythm, and lyric, and song forms and styles. The class will operate in a workshop format with all class members bringing work for critique and advice to other participants. Previous songwriting experience is not necessary, but participants should come with a willingness to take some risks.

 

Texts: A class manual, available through Blackboard. Recommended: A rhyming dictionary, a thesaurus and any good book on the creative craft of writing such as: Peter Elbow's Writing with Power; Natalie Goldberg's Writing Down the Bones or Brenda Uelandi's If You Want to Write: A Book about Art, Independence and Spirit.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Attendance at all group sessions and willingness to fully engage in songwriting exercises, both in and out of class, including sharing your work once each week, Attendance at least two concerts which feature singer/songwriters including written review and critique, Development of a final songwriting portfolio and participation in a Songwriter's Showcase at the end of the term.

 

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22683| 354V Scriptwriting Workshop I

Larner (4 credit)

 

Materials Fee: $5.47

Prerequisites: previous course work or experience with creative writing, or permission of instructor

THIS COURSE MEETS THE HUMANITIES AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

The workshop is a collaborative, supportive group experience. Students are expected to comment on, support, and participate in the work of their fellow students. Initial exercises will be followed by gradual development of each student's project for the term. We may also read a published play or screenplay and discuss it together, as well as attend at least one production or film showing during the term. The emphasis in 354V is to acquire a working sense of dramatic action and a feel for how storytelling works dramatically. Students may work in any medium: stage, movies, television, radio, or cyberspace. Risk-taking, experimentation and trial-and-error are encouraged. By the end of the term, students will be expected to complete a one-act play (20-30 minutes) or its equivalent in another medium. Attention will be paid to getting complete drafts of scripts finished, and then if time remains, to get them ready for production: screenplays for video production and showcasing here on campus, and/or through the Projections Film Festival in Bellingham, and possibly beyond; stage plays for production here at Fairhaven, at the New Playwrights Theatre in the Theatre Arts Department, at iDiOM Theatre in Bellingham, at the Bellingham One Act Theatre (BOAT) Festival at the Bellingham Theatre Guild, and at new play festivals in Seattle, at Northwest Playwrights Alliance events, and other venues; and radio plays for production at KUGS.

 

Texts: Jeffrey Sweet, DRAMATIST'S TOOLKIT; Robert McKee, STORY; A play and/or a screenplay, TBA, may be required, as may attendance at selected film screenings and/or theatre productions.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students are expected to complete at least a substantial one-act play (approximately 20-30 minutes in length), or its equivalent in another medium. Work must be brought to class regularly and shared with the group. A portfolio of selected writings done during the term will be due at the end of the course. Dependable attendance; completion of assigned readings; progressively better informed, responsive and constructive participation in the workshop; and steady effort in rewriting and revising are required for credit. Writing will be evaluated for its beginning development of techniques, aptness for the stage (or the appropriate medium) and the overall development of the writer during the term. 23194


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23194| 357V Topics in Studio Art II: Wearable Art

S'eiltin (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: course fee will be added

Prerequisites: Fair 202a and previous experience in studio art or permission of instructor

 

Clothing and adornment serve as extremely powerful symbols; they can express and reinforce social values, relationships and meaning in culture, as well as contribute to the maintenance of cultural continuity. Through research and the creation of wearable art students will engage in questions concerning the relationship of dress to society, the nation and globalization. Readings will offer an opportunity to wrestle with issues of homogenizing heterogeneity that co-op the Other and the ability of the Other to resist and restate, through the construction of dress as a political discourse, ideologies of the dominant West. Researching to identify the local or national "fashion" of popular society will be required to inform the creation of wearable art. And central to discussions of dress as metaphor are questions concerning tradition, modernity, craft, fine art and current trends in wearable art that defy academic, industry and market categorization.

 

Required Text: Clark, Paulicelli, "The Fabric of Cultures: Fashion, Identity and Globalization", Routledge, 2009

 

Credit /Evaluation: Workshops in garment construction and repurposing, and felting and quilting techniques will inspire the creation of the five required projects. Presentations of artists who create dress and/or adornment as social statements will be required of each student. A sketchbook and journal are essential tools in generating ideas; students are required to make numerous entries throughout the quarter. Evaluations will be based on students' ability to apply content of class to the creation of five projects, complete all assignments in a timely manner and be willing to take creative risks and contribute to the overall creative environment of the class.

 

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23157 | 366E Comparative Cultural Studies

Thuma (4 credits)

 

Prerequisites: introductory-level course in history, sociology, anthropology or equivalent

Also offered as AMST 301 THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

This course draws on an interdisciplinary range of perspectives to arrive at a multi-vocal, multi-ethnic understanding of U.S. history, culture, and politics. It asks how racial categories and hierarchies have been created, inhabited, challenged, and transformed over time, with an emphasis on the intertwined social histories and contemporary contexts of African Americans, American Indians, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and Arab Americans. Students will gain familiarity with key concepts and approaches used to study the interrelationships of race and racism, economic stratification, and gender and sexual identities and inequalities. Class time will consist of lectures, discussion, film screenings, and small group work.

 

Texts: Paula Rothenberg, ed., Race, Class, and Gender in the United States (eighth edition); and Ronald Takaki, A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America (2008 edition).

 

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will be based on consistent attendance, prepared and active participation in class sessions, and quality of written work. Assignments may include participation in online discussion forums; midterm and final essay exams; a media research assignment; one film response paper (2-3 pages); and one primary source analysis paper (2-3 pages).

 

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21783 | 370H Audio Recording II

Fish (5 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $77.21

Prerequisites: Fair 270h or permission of instructor

NOTE: This course was formally 375h. Students who received credit for 375h may not take 370h for credit.

 

Audio Recording II takes the concepts introduced in Fair 275h, Audio Recording I, and allows the student to apply and practice them in a "hands-on" manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Fairhaven Recording Studio. Students will complete two small-group multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdub, and mix-down sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course also improves the development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work.

 

Texts: None.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

 

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21784 | 370P Introduction to Pro Tools

Fish (2 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $43.82

Prerequisites: Fair 370h or permission of instructor

This class is equivalent to Fair 375p taught through Spring 2010. Students who completed Fair 375p cannot receive credit for this class.

 

This class will introduce students to mixing and editing audio with Avid's Pro Tools 9 software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mastering processes such as compression/limiting, dithering and equalization. As this is primarily a mixing class, already recorded material (from Audio II or otherwise) is helpful. Students will be expected to attend class regularly, demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work.

 

Texts: Reprinted materials.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

 

Meeting Times: Students may choose to attend either a Wednesday or Thursday section from 12-1pm.

 

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21785 | 370Q Pro Tools HD Recording

Fish (2 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $43.82

Prerequisites: Fair 370p

 

This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Students will be expected to conduct at least two recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final mix for in-class critique. † Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. This class is repeatable.

 

Texts: Reprinted materials.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

 

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23253 | 371E Nations and Nationalism

O'Murchu (5 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $7.50

Prerequisites: Fair 203a or permission

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

Course Concepts: Nationalism, the Nation-State, Political Symbols Nationalism is the most powerful form of political solidarity in the modern world. Why does national identity assume such a large role in people's lives? Is loyalty to a particular nation state or nationality a new phenomenon or an ancient one? Why do people die and kill in the name of national identities, but not nearly so often on the basis of class or gender? These are some of the important questions that we will try to address in this course - all revolving around the question of where society's borders lie and who belongs fully to society and who is marginalized.

 

The aim of this course is to understand how it was historically that people began to think of themselves and experience society as members of nations. Although we tend to think of countries and nations as timeless, in many ways they're relatively new. As well as studying the general sociology of nationalism, we will compare and contrast varieties of nationalism that challenge the national state model in the Middle East and in Latin America. How did Arab nationalism disrupt the nation-building projects of state elites across the Arab world? How have indigenous rights movements challenged national citizenship in South America?

 

Texts :Craig Calhoun, Nationalism (Minnesota, 1998); Adeed I. Dawisha, Arab Nationalism in the Twentieth Century: From Triumph to Despair (Princeton NJ: Princeton, 2012 ed.); David Laitin, Nations, States, and Violence (NY: Oxford, 2007); Deborah Yashar, Contesting Citizenship in Latin America: The Rise of Indigenous Movements and the Post Liberal Challenge (NY: Cambridge, 2005)

 

Credit/Evaluation: Attendance, preparation and engaged, active participation; four short reviews of course texts; and a longer review essay on an outside book (or research project)

 

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23544 | 375S Business Plans for Social Entrepreneurship

Coulet du Gard (4 credit)

 

Prerequisite: Fair 387k or Fair 397h or permission of instructor

 

This course examines business plans for social entrepreneurship (small business and nonprofit structures), emphasizing socially responsible and sustainable systems.

 

Have you ever dreamed of starting your own business or becoming part of a team to create a nonprofit organization? Have you ever wondered why so many small businesses and new nonprofits fail? This course is a practical course analyzing and applying step-by-step the major processes in creating a a solid plan for social entrepreneurship success.

 

Students interested in pursuing a career in the nonprofit world, creating their own nonprofit, or establishing a for-profit business will be required to create a business plan or strategic plan, step by step. Emphasis will be placed on US systems, although the course will also provide examples from international social entrepreneurship. Guest speakers will be brought in to discuss aspects of business and strategic planning. Blackboard documents comprise a part of the readings.

 

Texts: David Bornstein and Susan Davis SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP: WHAT EVERYONE NEEDS TO KNOW, 2010 available free online through WWU library. Also in print; Harvard Business Press (Author) CREATING A BUSINESS PLAN (Pocket Mentor) 2007; Jennifer Lee THE RIGHT-BRAIN BUSINESS PLAN: A CREATIVE, VISUAL MAP FOR SUCCESS 2011; John M. Bryson and Farnum K. Alston CREATING YOUR STRATEGIC PLAN: A WORKBOOK FOR PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION 2011

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be expected to write at least six segments of a business plan, culminating in a 10 page project and a short presentation (oral and/or digital) to the class; participate in class discussions of assigned readings; lead one topic 15 minute discussion during the quarter; and attend classes regularly (no more than 3 missed classes will be allowed.) I keep a daily log on attendance and participation.

 

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21787 | 393B Rights, Liberties, and Justice in America

Larner (4 credit)

 

Materials Fee: $7.74

Prerequisites: upper-division courses in social science or history recommended

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT.

 

The USA PATRIOT Act, the Homeland Security Act, recent revisions of the FISA Act, and recent actions by the Justice Department, the courts, the past President, and the current President have restricted the civil liberties of all Americans, and increased levels of permissible surveillance on individuals and groups. More recent legislation has confirmed the power of the President to jail individuals indefinitely, and in complete secrecy--in effect, to "disappear" them. Immigrants have been detained, held indefinitely, and deported with no charges and no hearings. Religious, political and charitable groups have been placed under surveillance. Incidents of torture have been disclosed, but no high-ranking officers have been held responsible. At the same time the rights of corporations as "persons" under the law have been enhanced, most notably with the US Supreme Court decision in the CITIZENS UNITED case.

 

Is there such a thing as an appropriate "balance" between civil liberties and national security? If so, what kinds of measures are justified? If not, what promotes security in a democratic society? Are racial, national, or religious profiling violations of right? To what extent should "human rights" be "civil rights"? What needs to be done to re-assert constitutional protections, to promote democracy and open government? Does the Occupy Wall Street movement offer any clues?

 

In this course, our primary task will be to understand the Bill of Rights, the first ten amendments to the Constitution, and cases which illustrate the issues and competing interests surrounding them. We will also learn something about the history of rights and liberties in America, examined critically from a variety of perspectives. Students can expect to read extensively and to be researching, reporting and writing about issues and developments in civil liberties. One short, mid-term paper on an issue, and a final research paper, and class presentations on each, will be required.

 

Texts: Common readings will be selected from IN OUR DEFENSE, by Ellen Alderman and Caroline Kennedy; JUSTICE IN THE UNITED STATES: HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE U.S. CONSTITUTION, by Judith Blau and Alberto Moncada; TAKING LIBERTIES, by Susan Herman; UNEQUAL PROTECTION, by Thom Hartmann; and other works. Some articles and materials will be provided.

 

Credit/Evaluation: The class requires the contributions of all its members. Reliable attendance, preparation and participation in discussion, and a willingness to tackle projects and bring them back to class are all vital to the learning community. Evaluation will be based on the student's learning as reflected in writings and other projects, and on the participation of the student with others in the daily activities of the seminar.

 

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