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WWU / Fairhaven College of Interdiscipinary Studies

Winter 2013 Courses: 300 Level

11383 | 303A Core: Interdisciplinary Concentration Seminar

Bower (5 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $7.20

Prerequisites: Fair 101a, 201a, 203a and 305a

Required of students in the Interdisciplinary Concentration. Note: If you began at Fairhaven during Summer quarter and did not take 101a, contact Kathy Johnson for an override.

Note: Required of all students pursuing the Interdisciplinary Concentration as their major. The Concentration Proposal must be completed and filed at least three quarters before graduation.

 

This seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary self-designed concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. While your Concentration Committee must finally approve your proposal, you will work collaboratively in small groups, meeting with each other weekly, and meeting with the instructor individually in order to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals. Here are some of the questions we will examine through this process:

- What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved?

- What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree?

- How can your intentions be given effective shape and form?

- Who should be on your committee?

- How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually?

- What are the best vehicles for your learning?

- What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration?

 

Text: Handbook provided.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Work steadily on your proposal, meet regularly with your group, contribute to the development of your group members' proposals, work cooperatively, prompt attendance to all meetings. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

 

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11384| 305A Writing and Transition Conference

McClure (3 credits)

 

Prerequisites: FAIR 101a and FAIR 201a.

 

The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students. Your WRITING PORTFOLIO will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by two Fairhaven faculty, including your advisor. Your TRANSITION CONFERENCE is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them.

 

This is not a class, however YOU MUST ATTEND ONE OF THE FOLLOWING ORIENTATION MEETINGS: Tuesday January 15th, 3:00 p.m. or Wednesday January 16, 11:00a.m. (meeting location will be sent via email to registered students and posted at Fairhaven College).

 

In order to receive credit for FAIR305a you must:

1)Submit your Writing Portfolio & 2 copies of green Writing Portfolio Evaluation Form to Jackie McClure by Monday, January 28. Writing Portfolios must follow the format outlined on the green Writing Portfolio Instructions and Evaluation Form (available on the FAIR 305a blackboard and in the Fairhaven College Office.)

2)Schedule and conduct your Transition Conference and write your Transition Conference statement and submit it to all conference participants. Consult your faculty advisor and the yellow Transition Conference form for details.

3)After your Transition Conference, submit your Transition Conference form to Jackie McClure with the signatures of all participants.

 

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13132 | 310N American Indians in the Cinema

Rowe (5 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $4.32

Prerequisites: previous course in Native American studies or permission of instructor

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

Why do most Indians "crack up" at some scenes in very serious movies such as Powwow Highway and Smoke Signals? Why do Pawnees often complain that the quintessential Indian-friendly movie, Dances With Wolves, is not friendly at all? What negative stereotypes of Natives do Hollywood movies perpetuate? Does cinema replicate the stereotypes and images found in popular literature and culture? What are the impacts of those stereotypes on Indians' identity, self-esteem, and cultural survival? To what extent do Natives participate in producing cinema? Can the cinema be a force of empowerment for Natives? Can it be a weapon of resistance? This course seeks answers to these questions and more. We will view representative films from major periods in the history of cinema and students will view additional videos outside of class. During the course students will write several short papers on the films and readings. As a final research/ teaching project students will present a formal review of a film chosen in consultation with the instructor.

 

Texts: Required: Jacquelyn Kilpatrick. CELLULOID INDIANS: NATIVE AMERICANS AND FILM. Recommended: S. Elizabeth Bird, DRESSING IN FEATHERS: THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE INDIAN IN AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE; Philip J. Deloria, PLAYING INDIAN; Michael Hilger, FROM SAVAGE TO NOBLEMAN: IMAGES OF NATIVE AMERICANS IN FILMS; Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor, HOLLYWOOD'S INDIAN: THE PORTRAYAL OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN IN FILM.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Participants will be evaluated on attendance, meaningful contributions to discussions, and the effectiveness and quality of written assignments including the final research/teaching project.

 

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13402| 312E Transgender Identities & History

Montoya-Lewis (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $14.49

Prerequisites: FAIR 201A and FAIR 203A.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

You know who you are. No one has to tell you. - David Reimer (Sex: Unknown) How do you know you are male or female, man or woman? From birth, we are told we are one or the other and expected to behave in accordance with the norms associated with our sex, our gender. But many do not - and as a result, transgendered people (those who are born as one sex, but identify more closely with another, those who are born with sexually ambiguous genitalia, those who are intersex, and other identities) are among the most marginalized people in U.S. society. In this course, we will look at the histories and identities of transgendered people. In so doing, we will interrogate mainstream U.S. society's beliefs about sex and gender, look at other society's beliefs about the same, as well as look closely at our own personal identities and histories of gender.

 

In this course, we will learn from many guest speakers, read personal stories and academic analyses, and discuss, discuss, discuss. Assignments will develop from the class discussion; expect this to be a reflective course that will require each of us to consider closely our own beliefs about ourselves.

 

Text: to be announced.

 

Credit/Evaluation: The success of this class depends upon the active participation of each student. I expect excellent attendance (more than two absences may result in no credit for the course) as well as successful completion of all assignments.

 

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13609 | 312F Globalizations since 1870

O'Murchu (5 credits)

 

Prerequisites: Fair 203a or Intl 201 required; and Fair 212c or Econ 206 recommended

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

This course offers an overview of the global political economy from the late nineteenth century to the early twenty-first. This period is bookended by two extended periods of increasing global trade, investment, and migration from 1870-1914 and from 1972 (or 1990) to the present, now known by the ungainly moniker globalization. The period between British- and American-led globalizations was a period of great turmoil and upheaval in world politics and the global economy, shaped by the two World Wars, the great depression, and the Cold War.

 

We will examine how and why the first era of globalization collapsed leading via the First World War via the speculations and inflations of the twenties to the Great Depression, the rise of fascisms, and World War Two. We will then show how the global political economy was reestablished as a system of managed liberal capitalism in the West during the Cold War but how that system eroded and was gradually displaced by a neo-liberal form of global political economy from the 1970s and especially since the end of the Cold War. We ask whether the current global capitalist system is destined to implode like its predecessor or can be better managed and maintained.

 

In particular, we look at the problems of: unequal trade between developed and developing countries; the political economy of capital mobility and financial instability; the global economic crisis; debt; and structural inequalities in health and development between the developed and developing world.

 

Texts: Jeffry Frieden, GLOBAL CAPITALISM: ITS FALL AND RISE IN THE TWENTIETH Century (NY: Norton, 2007) Eric Hobsbawm, THE AGE OF EXTREMES: A SHORT HISTORY OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (NY: Vintage, 1996)

 

Credit/Evaluation: Attendance, preparation and engaged, active participation; written responses to regular reading/discussion questions; a profile and presentation on one country's global integration; and an 8-page term paper.

 

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13638| 313E Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Education Issues

Eaton (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $14.49

Prerequisites: FAIR 219D or AMST 242

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

"The message from the top down is -if you want to make it kid, just stay locked in the closet!" - (Michaelangelo Signorele, Queer in America, 1993.)

 

Schools often reflect the social mores of the society around them, for better or for worse. In a culture that is almost uniformly heterosexist, and often actively homophobic and transphobic, gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgendered, gender-queer and questioning youth face rejection, isolation, verbal harassment and even physical violence in schools. Queer or trans teachers fear dismissal and ostracism, and families fight to create safe environments for their children. In this course we will examine the issues for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, gender-queer and questioning students, families and teachers in the education system. Specifically, questions about inclusive curriculum, impact of mediated heterosexism, homophobia and transphobia on children and youth, political and structural impacts on social and interpersonal development and sexual identity formation, and coming out issues will be explored.

 

In the end, we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand, we will understand only what we are taught. Baba Dioum

 

Texts: Arthur Lipkin, Understanding Homosexuality, Changing Schools and other readings as assigned on Blackboard.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Active, informed participation in class discussions, regular attendance, timely and competent completion of the in-class assignments, chapter response papers, a curriculum analysis paper, a narrative on 'schooling stories,' a narrative on ally behaviors, a research paper on an issue related to the course and a short class presentation to the class on your research.

 

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13678 | 319B Current Issues in Law: Education Policy

Ferrare (4 credits)

 

Prerequisites: FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 211B (now FAIR 311b)

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

This course focuses on how public policy is created, implemented, and evaluated, with a specific emphasis on education policy. The course will explore these topics through a variety of case studies at the federal, state, local, and grassroots levels. The main focus will be on educational policy in the United States, but there will be some references to educational policies in other countries. In addition to focusing on the various phases of policy-making, we will also focus on conceptual frameworks, theories, and research methods used in the implementation and evaluation phases of the policy-making process. Students can expect to leave the course with a solid introduction to the following: existing educational law and policy; how educational policy is created, implemented, and evaluated; who is involved in this process; the political contexts of educational policy; and the implications these policies have for shaping the educational system.

 

Texts: Readings for this course will be assigned through Blackboard. Please contact me if you would like to learn more about the specific readings to be assigned.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be expected to complete the readings and participate actively in class discussions. In addition, students will be asked to complete 2-3 policy analyses/briefs along with a final research project that examines a specific educational legislation or policy in detail.

 

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11579 | 323G Imaginative Writing II: American Women Poetry

Cornish (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $7.51

Prerequisites: FAIR 222G, or FAIR 222H, a course in creative writing or instructor permission.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE HUMANITIES AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

This course takes its focus from Alicia Ostriker's book, STEALING THE LANGUAGE: THE EMERGENCE OF WOMEN'S POETRY IN AMERICA. Although not a survey course, the class examines the struggle of American female voices to define themselves, both with and against literary tradition. In 1650, Anne Bradstreet wrote, "I am obnoxious to each carping tongue/Who says my hand a needle better fits." This seminar will explore the work of a number of female poets - largely from the 20th and 21st centuries, although we will make forays into previous centuries at various points to look at antecedents. Emily Dickinson wrote, "I'm Nobody" at approximately the same time Whitman proclaimed that he was multitudes. In what way must women "steal" language? What is the meaning of gender in poetry - and in poetic reception? What do women have to say [qua women], and in what ways, new or old, do they choose to say it? What about women who don't want to be identified by gender, preferring just to be seen as poets? How do specific poetic modes intersect with the interests and voices of women (modernism, confessionalism, language poetry, etc.) There has been an extraordinary tide of poetry by contemporary American women: are such writers challenging and transforming the shape of poetry? This class is an advanced poetry workshop; it is writing-intensive. We will study models and write poems weekly. Although we'll turn our attention to various themes which Ostriker identifies with the female experience (such as the body's language), we'll stay open to the understanding that gender identity may prove more complex than "male" or "female" distinctions. Your experience -- and the voice you give to it -- will enliven and (enlighten) our study.

 

Text: WHEN SHE NAMED FIRE: AN ANTHOLOGY OF CONTEMPORARY POETRY BY AMERICAN WOMEN (ed. Budy); others as announced

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students are expected to make a commitment to our writing community, bringing with them an absolute respect for the potential of each voice--their own as well as that of others. They'll participate in the growth of those voices by: completing all writing assignments and rewrites; studying all assigned readings; taking an active part in class discussions and peer critiques. The nature of workshop is collaborative and supportive - dare I say loving? Attendance is required: more than three absences and you will not receive credit for the class.

 

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13660| 328M American Lives: Whitman & Neruda

Tag (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $7.52

Prerequisites: FAIR 202A or instructor permission.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE HUMANITIES AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

"This is what you shall do: Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body." - Walt Whitman

 

"Writing these odes in this year nineteen hundred and fifty-five, readying and tuning my demanding, murmuring lyre, I know who I am and where my song is going. I understand that the shopper for myths and mysteries may enter my wood and adobe house of odes, may despise the utensils, the portraits of father and mother and country on the walls, the simplicity of the bread and the saltcellar. But that's how it is in my house of odes. I deposed the dark monarchy, the useless flowing hair of dreams, I trod on the tail of the cerebral reptile, and set things - water and fire - in harmony with man and earth. I want everything to be a cup or a tool, I want people to enter a hardware store through the door of my odes. I work at cutting newly hewn boards, storing casks of honey, arranging horseshoes, harness, forks: I want everyone to enter here, let them ask questions, ask for anything they want. I am from the South, a Chilean, a sailor returned from the seas. I did not stay in the islands, a king. I did not stay ensconced in the land of dreams. I returned to labor simply beside others, for everyone. So that everyone may live here, I build my house with transparent odes." - Pablo Neruda

 

The poetry and lives of Walt Whitman (1819-1892) and Pablo Neruda (1904-1973) offer us an intriguing dialogue. These two men from two American continents, living in two different centuries, speaking two different languages, write out of a common passion for life, for politics, for love, for the earth, for women and men and all the ways in which they connect to each other, for cities and rivers, for the turn of a wrist, the taste of a lemon, the music in a song, and for sadness and wonder and a deep belief in the power of ordinary people to transform the world. Together we will read, discuss, and explore their poetry, walk through the landscapes of their lives, and let them inspire our own creative expressions. Such an undertaking will demand candor, commitment, passion, and a willingness to listen well to these poets, to each other, and to the internal rhythms and outward songs of our own American lives.

 

Texts: POETRY AND PROSE, by Whitman; THE POETRY OF PABLO NERUDA, by Neruda.

 

Requirements: Your presence. A spirit of inquiry. Active sharing of insights, questions, interpretations, and inspirations during our discussions. Full participation in class activities. Completion and quality of coursework - including writing several reflective essays, your own Whitmanesque and Nerudaean poems, and a personal/analytical narrative, giving an oral or creative presentation, and designing, making, and sharing a final project.

 

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13611 | 335P Global Biodiversity Science & Politics

Tuxill (4 credits)

 

Prerequisites: FAIR 206A or equivalent.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

This course studies "biodiversity" diversity and richness of life on earth. Do you like to eat all kinds of fruits, vegetables, meats, or spices in your daily diet? Thankful for fast-acting medicine - or maybe a soothing herbal tea - when you're sick? Appreciate clean water, fertile soil in your garden, and a good roof over your head when its raining? You can thank biodiversity for all of that. Over the past two decades, biological diversity - including the variety of living organisms and ecological patterns in nature--has emerged as a key concept for how scientists, philosophers, and many others think about the environment and our place in it. The future that the world's people determine for biodiversity will play a crucial role in the health of the planet and the sustainability of human communities and global society. This course has three primary goals. The first is to learn how biological diversity is defined, measured, mapped, and understood by biologists and other scientists. The second is to understand the benefits that biodiversity provides for humankind and the ways that those benefits are increasingly placed at risk. The third goal is to explore strategies and policies for conserving biological diversity worldwide. In exploring both threats to biodiversity and the policies and institutions designed to conserve it, we will examine underlying assumptions about globalization, sustainability, and environmental preservation.

 

Texts: E.O. Wilson, BIOPHILIA; additional reading assignments will be drawn from scientific journals and other sources, and distributed via Blackboard.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and informed contribution to discussions is essential. Evaluation will be based on each student's grasp and understanding of the issues presented in the readings and discussions. Students also will: (1) complete several problem sets, online investigations, and other brief homework assignments; (3) prepare and present individual research projects on a biodiversity conservation case study; and (4) complete a final essay exam (take home, open book).


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13398 | 336N Topics in Science: Infectious Disease

Schwandt (4 credits)

 

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

Naturally occurring infectious disease outbreaks, or deliberate outbreaks via bioterrorism, have the potential to end millions of lives prematurely. Globally, more deaths occur each year due to infectious disease than cancer. People living in developing countries, particularly children under the age of five, are especially vulnerable to infectious disease. Students in the infectious disease course will explore past, current and predicted future infectious disease outbreaks. Infectious disease case studies in the course include: acute respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, HIV, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, malaria, smallpox, polio, dengue and chikungunya. For each case study the class will explore the infectious disease microorganism, the disease spreading agents and the social conditions that either facilitate or inhibit the spread of infectious disease.

 

Texts: Readings on each topic from popular and technical sources will be assigned and posted. (There is no textbook for this course.)

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated on their attendance, preparation for and participation in course discussions. Each student will work independently on a research presentation and two drafts of a research paper (8-10 pages) detailing the microbiology, transmission and social conditions associated with one selected infectious disease.


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13679 | 336B Topics in Social Issues: Education & Social Order

Ferrare (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $13.73

Prerequisites: FAIR 203a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

In 1932 George Counts raised the question, "Dare the school build a new social order?" Counts' question spoke to a provocative debate that is as relevant today as it ever has been: Does the education system reproduce inequalities in society, or are there instances in which education provides spaces to contest and transform existing social orders? In this course we will use the "production/reproduction" debate as a way to critically examine mainstream and alternative educational practices, and the role these practices can and do play in shaping gender, class, ethnic, and race relations within educational systems and the broader social order. To examine these relationships we will primarily draw from a range of critical theories, as well as empirical research spanning the past 35 years. With this focus in mind the course will center on the following specific themes:

1. The historical and contemporary roles of education and "schooling" in society

2. The sociological and political contexts of pedagogy and the curriculum

3. Issues involving race, class, gender, ethnicity, and immigration (and their dynamics)

4. Education policy

5. Alternative educational practices and "real" utopias

 

These themes are not mutually exclusive and do not constitute a sequential order. Rather, they represent a sample of the many points of reference from which we will situate education within the social order.

 

Texts: Dare the School Build a New Social Order? by George Counts; In addition, there will be numerous journal articles and chapter selections (on Blackboard) spanning sociology, education, political science, philosophy, history, and anthropology. These selections include the work of (among others): Herbert Kliebard, Pierre Bourdieu, Annette Lareau, Michael Apple, Ivan Illich, John Ogbu, Madeleine Arnot, James Gee, Maxine Greene, Jeannie Oakes, Pamela Perry, Dianne Ravitch, Diana Hess, Erik Wright, and David Labaree.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Students are expected to critically engage with the readings and class discussions on a regular basis (including two "synthesis workshops"), and to complete biweekly in-class writing assignments. In addition, students are expected to complete three formal writing assignments.


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13683 | 336N Topics in Science: Healthy Plate and Healthy Planet

Hahn (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $15.00

Prerequisites: FAIR 206a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

What is the imprint of your appetite? What are the hidden environmental and social costs of our 21st Century dinner table? How can we be informed food citizens and ambassadors of eco-gastronomy - ,the pleasures of good food raised or harvested sustainably? How can we envision a food system that is healing for person and planet? In this class you will develop a foundation for understanding the connections among food production, ecology, ethics, cuisine, nutrition and health within the framework of sustainability. We'll examine both local and global food systems.

 

"Global warming" and "ocean deserts" may not cross your mind when you sit down to dinner. Yet, livestock creates more emissions than all combined transportation on the globe. More than a third of both the world's grain and fish catch now go to feed livestock. In return we get only a fraction of those nutrients. Eating tofu from China-grown soybeans is a step up, but how can we do better? If we're serious about the climate crisis, says Anna Lappe' in "Diet for a Hot Planet," we have to talk about food. We'll also address the special interests resisting a public conversation for sustainable food systems and the spin tactics companies use to deflect the heat. For instance, we'll examine the story of Monsanto, an agribusiness giant and the world's leading producer of GMOs (genetically modified organisms). We'll also revisit organic farming's promises and pitfalls. We'll discover principles for a climate-friendly diet and success stories from sustainable food advocates around the globe. Guest speakers and films will illuminate readings and spark class discussions. We'll also dig into local dirt and regional cuisine via two field trips to farms and artisan food makers plus an evening 100-mile-dinner. Through weekly cooking projects, we'll celebrate the pleasures of sustainably grown and harvested foods.

 

Texts: Anna Lappe's "Diet for a Hot Planet"; Paul Greenberg "Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food"; Marie-Monique Robin's "The World According to Monsanto: Pollution, Corruption, and the Control of the World's Food Supply"; Maria Rodale's "Organic Manifesto: How Organic Farming Can Heal Our Planet, Feed the World, and Keep Us Safe"; plus handouts and on-line readings.

 

Credit/Evaluation: 1) Class attendance and informed, thoughtful participation; 2) Sustainable and local food cooking project; 3) Critical Reading Journal; 4) 7-10 page research paper or Service Learning project/journal (pending instructor approval).


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13684| 336N Topics in Science: Salish Sea

Burnett (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: To Be Added

Prerequisites: FAIR 206a or equivalent

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SCIENCE AND OUR PLACE ON THE PLANET UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

Using an interdisciplinary systems approach, we will explore our unique inland sea, its surrounding communities and watersheds. We will uncover the geological and human history of the region, from the first people to inhabit its shores and fish its waters to the Europeans who explored and settled here, naming it Puget's Sound. We will try to understand the intricate web of life of the Salish Sea, a web that extends far beyond its salt margins to include plants and animals - including ourselves - in the headlands as well. We'll discuss the health of this complex ecosystem, diagnose its challenges and study its prognosis. The course will focus on how scientific, cultural, political, and economic choices are brought to bear on multifaceted, dynamic problems, and will emphasize positive, practical steps that can be, and are being taken to preserve and restore the Salish Sea.

 

Texts: Arthur Kruckeberg, A NATURAL HISTORY OF PUGET SOUND COUNTRY; Kurt Hoelting, THE CIRCUMFERENCE OF HOME: ONE MAN'S YEARLONG QUEST FOR A RADICALLY LOCAL LIFE; John Lombard, SAVING PUGET SOUND: A CONSERVATION STRATEGY FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

 

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, active, informed and engaged participation in class discussions and activities, two research/reflection papers, with class presentations on each, one mid-term, and one the final week of the quarter.

 

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13681 | 343U Advanced Topics in Mind & Body: Somatic Psychology

Nichols (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $15.47

Prerequisites: FAIR 201A

 

Students interested in the emerging field of mind body topics will benefit from this in-depth survey of Somatic Psychology. Through the assigned text and other interdisciplinary literature, lectures, discussion, and experiential inquiry, we will examine the emergence of a transdisciplinary inquiry into the nature and debatable unity of the body, the mind, the environment, and the self-organizing felt sense experience of these three influences. Over the past two decades this inquiry has matured into the relatively new field of Somatic Psychology, which is attempting to publish, advance, and hold the core of the inquiry while multiple disciplines are used for philosophical and empirical evidence that support, refine, and clarify the basic assumptions of a somatic life. Parallel to this mission is developing practical applications in the clinical psychotherapeutic domain. This course will map the historical emergence of the field and track the core questions and assumptions that define the field. We will look generally at the variety of body-centered psychotherapies, movement practices, and other such branches of Somatic Psychology. Specifically, we will critically assess the current and future challenges of the field, centering on some of the deepest and most passionate questions of academic inquiry. Are the mind and body separate? How do the mind and body relate? What is healing? What is energy? What is the placebo effect and what does it say about the mind and body relationship? How does the gut participate in reason? How is our experience of our self as embodied beings sculpted by culture? This challenging course will require thinking through multiple lines of reasoning and a curiosity to experientially explore to come to a critical and basic understanding of the field of Somatic Psychology.

 

Text: THE EMERGENCE OF SOMATIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BODYMIND THERAPY, Barbaby B. Barratt (2010, Palgrave Macmillan).

 

Credit/Evaluation: For full credit, each student will be required to fulfill each of the following (1) Regular and timely attendance; (2) consistent participation; (3) one midterm visual map showing comprehension of the development of the field; (4) one 6-8 page integration paper, and (5) one final group project/ presentation on a specific branch of Somatic Psychology.

 

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13619 | 358W Advanced Acrylic Painting

Feodorov (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $17.17

Prerequisites: FAIR 258W.

 

This course will focus on further development of painting techniques, allowing students to continue to hone their skills and ideas. Students will develop and explore their own themes and push their art into more conceptual areas. Each student will complete a MINIMUM OF 5 PAINTINGS with accompanying written artist statements. Students will work during and outside of class time while maintaining a 40-page sketchbook. In addition, students will research and give a presentation to the class on an artist/painter from a compiled list. Each student will present their paintings to the class and participate in class discussions about their work. While some supplies may be provided, students must bring their own materials such as acrylic paints, canvases or paper, brushes, rags, and plastic cups for water and mixing. A materials list will be emailed to registered students a week before the quarter begins and handed out the first day of class. Documentation of artwork, looking for exhibition opportunities as well as developing an Artist Statement will also be discussed.

 

Please note: Intro To Acrylic Painting and Advanced Acrylic Painting will be taught concurrently. The advanced level requires prior instructor approval.

 

Text: no text, but occasional handouts will be given.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Credit will be based upon regular attendance, quality of coursework and active class participation, and completion of all projects, readings and assignments in a timely manner. Students are required to maintain and complete a 40-page sketchbook for both sessions.

 

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13187 | 366E Comparative Cultural Studies

Thuma (4 credits)

 

Prerequisites: Also offered as AMST 301

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

This course draws on an interdisciplinary range of perspectives to arrive at a multi-vocal, multi-ethnic understanding of U.S. history, culture, and politics. It asks how racial categories and hierarchies have been created, inhabited, challenged, and transformed over time, with an emphasis on the intertwined social histories and contemporary contexts of African Americans, American Indians, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and Arab Americans. Students will gain familiarity with key concepts and approaches used to study the interrelationships of race and racism, economic stratification, and gender and sexual identities and inequalities. Class time will consist of lectures, discussion, film screenings, and small group work.

 

Texts: Paula Rothenberg, ed., Race, Class, and Gender in the United States (eighth edition); and Ronald Takaki, A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America (2008 edition).

 

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will be based on consistent attendance, prepared and active participation in class sessions, and quality of written work. Assignments may include participation in online discussion forums; midterm and final essay exams; a media research assignment; one film response paper (2-3 pages); and one primary source analysis paper (2-3 pages).

 

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13131 | 369D American War Stories

Rowe (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $4

Prerequisites: FAIR 203A or permission of instructor.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

This seminar presents an exploration of the major stories (literature, cinema, arts) and social movements produced by American wars. Rather than a traditional history of the wars aimed at discovering how and why someone lost and why others won, the seminar examines the impacts war has had on American and opponents' veterans, families, arts and ideals. We will learn how war affects people at the individual and family level, how movements of support and resistance develop and what have been the wars' major influences on popular culture. Students will read several novels and see several videos together and engage additional materials to prepare a research and teaching project for presentation to the seminar.

 

Texts: Required: Hull, Jonathan. LOSING JULIA; Heller, Joseph. CATCH 22; French, Albert. PATCHES OF FIRE; Crawford John R. THE LAST TRUE STORY I'LL EVER TELL: AN ACCIDENTAL SOLDIER'S ACCOUNT OF THE WAR IN IRAQ.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation for purposes of granting credit will be based on regular attendance, meaningful participation in discussions, completion of assignments, and quality of the individual research and teaching project.

 

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11832 | 370H Audio Recording II

Fish (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $77.21

Prerequisites: FAIR 270H or permission of instructor.

NOTE: This course was formally 375h. Students who received credit for 375h may not take 370h for credit.

 

Audio Recording II takes the concepts introduced in Fair 275h, Audio Recording I, and allows the student to apply and practice them in a "hands-on" manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Fairhaven Recording Studio. Students will complete two small-group multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdub, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course also improves the development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work.

 

Texts: None.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

 

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11833 | 370P Intro to Pro Tools

Fish (2 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $43.82

Prerequisites: FAIR 370H or permission of instructor.

This class is equivalent to Fair 375p taught through Spring 2010. Students who completed Fair 375p cannot receive credit for this class.

 

This class will introduce students to mixing and editing audio with Avid's Pro Tools 9 software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mastering processes such as compression/limiting, dithering and equalization. As this is primarily a mixing class, already recorded material (from Audio II or otherwise) is helpful. Students will be expected to attend class regularly, demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work.

 

Texts: Reprinted materials.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class. Meeting Times: Students may choose to attend either a Wednesday or Thursday section from 12-1pm.

 

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11834 | 370Q Pro Tools HD Recording

Fish (2 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $43.82

Prerequisites: FAIR 370H or permission of instructor.

This class is equivalent to Fair 375p taught through Spring 2010. Students who completed Fair 375p cannot receive credit for this class.

 

This class will introduce students to mixing and editing audio with Avid's Pro Tools 9 software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mastering processes such as compression/limiting, dithering and equalization. As this is primarily a mixing class, already recorded material (from Audio II or otherwise) is helpful. Students will be expected to attend class regularly, demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work.

 

Texts: Reprinted materials.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class. Meeting Times: Students may choose to attend either a Wednesday or Thursday section from 12-1pm.

 

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13616 | 371B Topics in Middle East Studies: Arab Uprising

O'Murchu (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $7.20

Prerequisites: FAIR 203A or permission.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

Keywords: Authoritarianism, Political Islam, Resistance The Arab world erupted in a chain of uprisings against authoritarian rule two winters ago. The big questions we want to engage are why these uprisings occurred and whether they will succeed in creating more accountable governments in the Middle East. But to ask this we must first explore why authoritarian regimes were so strong in the region, the varying roles that Islamists played within and against those regimes, and the everyday practices of resistance engaged in by ordinary people including youth and women.

 

To this end we will read several books together: one on the political culture and biopolitics of authoritarianism in Syria; the second on Islamists in Egypt in the 1990s; the third on politics from below in everyday Middle Eastern life; and a student's choice of book on the 2011 Arab uprisings.

 

Texts: Lisa Wedeen, AMBIGUITIES OF DOMINATION: POLITICS, RHETORIC AND SYMBOLS IN CONTEMPORARY SYRIA (1999); Salwa Ismail, RETHINKING ISLAMIST POLITICS (2006); Assef Bayat, LIFE AS POLITICS: HOW ORDINARY PEOPLE CHANGE THE MIDDLE EAST (2009) and your choice of: James Gelvin, THE ARAB UPRISINGS: WHAT EVERYONE NEEDS TO KNOW (2012); Marc Lynch, THE ARAB UPRISING: THE UNFINISH REVOLUTIONS OF THE NEW MIDDLE EAST (2012); or Roger Owen, THE RISE AND FALL OF ARAB PRESIDENTS FOR LIFE (2012).

 

Credit/Evaluation: Preparation, attendance and informed, regular participation. Following the news from one country in the Middle East online. Four short reviews of our course texts and an outside book review essay or research paper.

 

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13608 | 375B Genocide

Akinrinade (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $10.29

Prerequisites: FAIR 203A or FAIR 334C or permission of instructor.

THIS COURSE MEETS THE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

This course explores the meaning, origins, forms and causes of genocide. It will examine major cases of genocide up to the present century as a basis for understanding the phenomenon. Case studies will include the experience of Native Americans, the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, the Nazi Holocaust, the Khmer Rouge period in Cambodia, and the cases of Rwanda and the Darfur region of The Sudan. To better understand the subject, the course will compare genocide, considered by many as the "ultimate crime" with other cases of mass murders, including war crimes and crimes against humanity - a recurring part of armed conflict in more recent times. The course will also explore ways in which this crime can be confronted and the role of international law in dealing with genocide.

 

Texts: THE ROOTS OF EVIL: THE ORIGINS OF GENOCIDE AND OTHER GROUP VIOLENCE, (2003) by Staub, Ervin

 

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments.

 

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13711 | 375O United States-Mexico Border

Osterhaus (3 credits)

 

The United States - Mexico border is one of the most dynamic and complex border regions of the world where there are some of the strongest contrasts with economies, populations and political factors and where the heavy militarized border creates both human and ecological concerns. This course, in addition to an optional follow up spring break field experience on the border, will†examine through readings, films, poetry, and local contacts critical border issues related to immigration, human rights, homeland security and economic policies of the United State. We will review the history of the border including border conflicts and trade agreements (NAFTA) with Mexico. We will discuss current human rights issues and the impact of border security on the environment, border communities and economies

 

TEXTS: The Wind Doesnít Need a Passport by Tyche Hendricks, 2010 and other books TBA

 

Course Requirements: Consistent attendance, thoughtful and thorough reading of assigned materials, active engagement in class discussions, critical viewing and reviewing of films, participation in a local field trip and one group project. This class or a comparable course is required for the US-MX border field course during spring break 2013.

 

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13875 | 375T Cyborg Ecology: Technological Development and Human Interaction with the Natural World

Bornzin / Winter-Tamkin(4 credits)

 

"We are faced with a paradox. On the one hand, technology and culture are fundamental to the separation of humans from nature, a separation that is at the root of the converging crisis of the present age. On the other hand, technology and culture explicitly seek to improve on nature: to make life easier, safer, and more comfortable... At least, that is what these technologies intended. But have we actually made the world better? If not, why has technology not achieved its intended purpose? How can a series of incremental improvements add up to crisis?" --Charles Eisenstein

 

Technology, and our interactions with and relationships to it, define our modern world and affect how we think, live and interact with each other and with the greater systems of nature. Major technological advancements have the potential for far-reaching consequences, many of which are not immediately understood. In the midst of such rapid technological change these interactions and relationships are in a constant state of flux. How does the ongoing development of technology shape the ways in which we interact with and relate to nature? What is being gained through technological advancement and what is being lost? Given how rapidly these changes are occurring, how do we as individuals and societies understand and live with such technologies, and how do we guide their growth in positive and sustainable ways? The primary goal of this course is to gain a more complete understanding of the complex and dynamic impact of technology on the relationships between human beings, our culture, and the natural world. We will work to apply critical thinking skills to understanding these transformations and evaluating the impacts on our lives, our communities, and nature through the investigation of a range of different concepts and perspectives from traditional ecological knowledge to the cutting edge of modern technological achievement. We will also look to the future and explore sustainable and resilient forms of technological development. Throughout this process we will investigate the interactions between a wide range of concepts, and examine the implications inherent to technological development and the place and value of nature in our modern world. Students will be encouraged to explore their own relationships with nature and technology and gain a clearer sense of how these elements interact with each other both in their daily lives and within a broader societal context.

 

Course Materials: Although this will be a reading-intensive course there are no full books or texts which you will be required to buy. Course materials will be available online through Blackboard in either the form of online links, PDFs, or as photocopied excerpts from various volumes. All books assigned will be brought in to class on the relevant day by the instructor so that students may look at them if interested.

 

Criteria for Evaluation: Students will be given credit based on regular attendance, informed participation in class discussions, weekly postings to the Blackboard message board, personal reflections at the beginning and middle of the quarter, a relevant final project and presentation, and a thoughtful evaluation at the end of the quarter.

 

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13685 | 387K Grant Writing Workshop

Coulet du Gard (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $6.89

 

This course focuses on the basics of grant writing, including researching and seeking funding sources; reading and interpreting funding guidelines; developing and refining proposals; and tricks of the trade. Development of individual short and long grant proposals are required.

 

Do you think of writing grants as begging for money? Do you have a fear of grant writing? Have you got a great idea that can't be implemented because you don't have the resources? This workshop will help you think of grant writing in a different way. Learning to prepare a good proposal allows you to help granting agencies find a way to spend the dollars they are required to spend to meet their own mandates. You need the money. They need to spend it. Your challenge is to find the match between your need and theirs, and to persuasively articulate that match. In this workshop you will learn the basics of writing proposals to funding agencies, including how to find appropriate funding sources, how to read and interpret funding guidelines, funding restrictions, the steps for developing and refining proposals, including the budget. Aspects of story telling will be used to help with the narrative process.

 

It is highly recommended that you have identified a project and an agency before the quarter begins.

 

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13682 | 388M Oral History

Robinson (4 credits)

 

Materials Fee: $6.89

Prerequisites: FAIR 223 or instructor permission

THIS COURSE MEETS THE HUMANITIES AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENT

 

Telling Their Stories: Interview-based Performance - " I have a desire for a history that explodes into the present, for a way of writing/telling history that makes something happen, that registers in the body and has material, ethical, political, emotional effects." - Jacquelyn Dowd Hall

 

If you view oral history as that dusty cassette tucked away in your grandmother's attic, this class will revolutionize your perceptions about how we gather and translate personal narratives, and illustrate just how integral oral history can be in the making of seriously amazing literature, art, and theatre! What might we do with other people's stories? How do we respectfully portray their experiences? How do we listen with exactitude to what others are saying so that, later, we are able to transform their words into vibrant and visceral performance pieces, multi-media presentations, and works of art?

 

We'll interview friends and family collecting their stories about what has been meaningful in their lives. We'll choose a topic as a class and go out into the field to collect a wide-variety of perspectives, and then weave our findings into a montage performance piece. We'll have opportunities to interview and perform the stories of complete strangers. This class is designed as a workshop in which we'll get to practice our interviewing skills on each other, become proficient with microphones, digital recording devices, etc. as well as begin to gather the skills necessary for performing oral history. We'll even experience the thrill of performing each other as we all dive into events and experiences from our own personal histories.

 

We will venture into the personal/political realm as we research and explore such well-known works as Twilight: Los Angeles by Anna Deavere Smith who portrays verbatim the accounts of individuals she interviewed after the L.A. riots following Rodney King's trial, and The Laramie Project, one of the most performed plays in America written and performed by Moises Kaufman and the Tectonic Theatre Project after they conducted over 200 interviews in Laramie, Wyoming following the death of Matthew Shepard.

 

Required Texts: REMEMBERING, ORAL HISTORY, by Della Pollock; CATCHING STORIES: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO ORAL HISTORY, by Donna DeBlasio; THE LARAMIE PROJECT, by Moises Kaufman and the Tectonic Theatre Project; FIRES IN THE MIRROR, and TWILIGHT: LOS ANGELES, by Anna Deavere Smith.

 

Credit/Evaluation: Attendance is crucial as this is a hands-on workshop, as is listening, risk-taking, and curiosity. All students are expected to conduct at least three significant interviews and perform three works-in-progress pertaining to each individual assignment during the course of the quarter. Required Final: Each student is responsible for a 20-minute memorized performance (may include multi-media) based on a person or an event.

 

*Special Final Option: Those students wishing to create and perform a full-scale group performance for Scholars Day (spring quarter 2013) can opt to register for a 2-credit Group ISP the first week of Winter Quarter. You will have several pick-up rehearsals, and one tech rehearsal at the beginning of Spring Quarter, and be responsible for organizing yourselves to ensure a successful performance on Scholars Day.

 

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