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WWU / Fairhaven College of Interdiscipinary Studies

Queer Studies Minor

Faculty Affiliates

Raine Dozier

Raine Dozier

I am a professor in the Human Services program and a sociologist who studies labor market inequality and gender theory. My work regarding racial/ethnic wage inequality among women has been widely published in journals including Social Forces and the Journal of African American Studies. My theoretical work investigates sex, gender, and sexuality. One of my studies investigates sociological gender theory through a transgender lens. An article out of this work, Beards, Breasts, and Bodies: Doing Sex in a Gendered World, won the American Sociological Association’s “Distinguished Article in Sex and Gender” award. Within the field of gender theory, my current project investigates the experiences of masculine females at work. I am the advisor for the Queer Studies minor and a member of Western’s LGBT Advisory Council. Publications and essays are available at https://sites.google.com/site/rainedozier.

Marie Eaton

Marie Eaton

Thirty-five years at WWU, currently faculty at Fairhaven College teaching about childhood, food pathways, queer issue in education, death and dying, memoirs, and songwriting.  Current interests include the roles that contemplation and reflective practice play in quality learning and in our negotiation of the strong emotions that arise as we face our world’s challenges. Longtime member of Motherlode, four woman band performing songs that tickle the funny bone and open the heart.

Question:  What color is hope?  Does it have feathers?

Carol Guess

Carol Guess

MFA Poetry, Indiana University 1994, Professor of English.

Carol Guess is the author of three novels: Seeing Dell, Switch, and Homeschooling; four poetry collections, Femme's Dictionary, Tinderbox Lawn, Love Is A Map I Must Not Set On Fire, and Doll Studies: Forensics; two essay collections, Gaslight and My Father In Water; and a flash fiction collection, Darling Endangered. Gaslight, Femme's Dictionary, and Homeschooling were Lambda Literary Award finalists. She teaches courses in Creative Writing (with an emphasis on artistic experimentation and hybrid forms) and Queer Studies (with an emphasis on contemporary American literature).

Kevin Leonard

Kevin Leonard

My research and teaching interests focus on racial ideologies in U.S. history and the experiences of African Americans, Latinas/os, and lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender people. My book, The Battle for Los Angeles: Racial Ideology and World War II, was published in 2006. I am currently working on another book manuscript, whose tentative title is “Rabies, Rubbish, and Race: African Americans and the Environment in Cold War Los Angeles.” My article, “Containing ‘Perversion’: African Americans and Same-Sex Desire in Cold War Los Angeles,” was published in the Journal of the History of Sexuality in September 2011. Among the courses I regularly teach are HIST 263: African Americans since 1865; HIST 265: LGBT Experiences in U.S. History, and HIST 353: Latinas/os in the U.S. West.

Kate Miller

Kate Miller

Kate Miller has a B.A. in Multicultural Studies and Creative Writing from Fairhaven College and an M.A. in English/Creative Writing from Western Washington University. She teaches WMSN 211 Introduction to Women’s Studies, WMNS 212 Feminist Theory, AMST 301 Comparative Race and Ethnicity, and AMST 242 LGBTQ Experience. Among Kate’s interests are Gender Identity Issues, Disability Studies, Cyber-feminism, and contemporary Native American literature. She is an avid reader and published poet and enjoys multiple literary genres, including poetry, creative nonfiction, and speculative fiction. She is currently working on a cross-genre manuscript called “Inventing Mother”, about mixed-race identity and adoption.

Debra Salazaar

Debra Salazar

Debra Salazar is Professor of Political Science and Affiliate Professor of Environmental Studies at Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington.  Her research centers on the relations between justice and environment as evidenced in the discourses and practices of the environmental movement.  Current projects focus on the politics of agricultural pesticide regulation in the Pacific Northwest and the nature of gentrification in rural and urban settings.  She has co-edited a book with Donald Alper, Sustaining the Forests of the Pacific Coast (University of British Columbia Press, 2000) and authored a number of chapters in other books.  Her articles have appeared in Organization & Environment, BC Studies, the Canadian Journal of Political Science, Society and Natural Resources, the Journal of Borderland Studies, and Social Science Quarterly, among other journals.  She has published creative nonfiction in Witness and The Other Journal.

Joanne DeMark

Joanne DeMark

I have a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL, where I came out in 1974, and also worked to bring women studies courses into graduate programs at UF.  My queer and human rights activism spans over 40 years; an early example was helping to organize queer and heterosexual communities in Florida to boycott orange juice when Anita Bryant was simultaneously spokesperson for the orange juice industry and campaigning to repeal the LGBT anti-discrimination ordinance passed in Miami Dade County. More recently, as a part of Atlanta's Queer Progressive Agenda, I worked to diminish police and neighborhood profiling of tran women of color in midtown Atlanta. With NCBI International, where I am an LGBTQ international leader, I have co-taught leadership at 5 Institutes at Creating Change. My research, teaching and writing interests include the role of heterosexual love in thehealing and health of LGBTQ people and “recruiting” principled believers in communities of faith to become more principled allies to LGBTQ people. I teach AMST 242 LGBTQ Experience.