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WWU / Fairhaven College of Interdiscipinary Studies

World Issues Forums/Paths to Global Justice

Fall 2009 Schedule

The World Issues Forums occur weekly on Wednesdays from 12:00-1:20pm each quarter.

Coordinator: Shirley Osterhaus shirley.osterhaus@wwu.edu
All events are free and everyone is welcome. Information: call 650-2309

 

See our college calendar to view this schedule by date, where the World Issues Forum events are listed in red.

 

video - Subscribe to our World Issues Forum Channel to see videos as they become available.

 

 

 

 

"Guinea Pigs, Dictators and International Justice"

Babafemi Akinrinade, Fairhaven College FacultyBabafemi Akinrinade, Assistant Professor of Human Rights, Fairhaven College, WWU

 

The establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) following the adoption of the Rome Statute in 1998 was, and remains, a significant step in the fight against impunity. To what extent is international criminal justice "international" in the face of the ICC's current work? Does international criminal justice have a future without a broadening of the reach of the ICC?

 

Wed 9/30

12 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven College Auditorium

 

Video

 

"Globalization and Migration in the Hispanic Caribbean: The Making of a Transnational Society in the Dominican Republic"

Ernesto SagasErnesto Sagás, PhD Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at Colorado State University

 

It has been said that the Caribbean, as a crossroads of empires, has always been globalized. Because of those powerful external forces acting on small populations, migration has been a constant feature in Caribbean societies. This presentation examines the impact of globalization and migration on the modern Hispanic Caribbean by looking at the Dominican Republic as a case study of a country that has been thoroughly transformed by these forces. Dominicans have emigrated en masse since the 1960s and nowadays well over 1.5 million Dominicans reside overseas. Though mass emigration was initially sparked by political events, structural changes in the Dominican economy brought about by globalization quickly became the main agent fostering migration. This presentation will look at how globalization and emigration have affected Dominican society, with an emphasis on the development of a transnational society and the impact on women.

 

Wed 10/7

12 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven College Auditorium

 

Video

 

"The Price of Sugar"

Price of Sugar DocumentaryA documentary (2007) on Haitian workers in the sugar fields of the Dominican Republic and the organizing work of Fr. Christopher Hartley in the struggle for human rights. watch: Trailer

 

 

 

Wed 10/8

7pm

Fairhaven College Auditorium

 

"Haiti in the World: Rethinking the Role of the International Community"

Michele WuckerMichele Wucker, Executive Director of the World Policy Institute

 

Haiti desperately needs the world's help. Four devastating storms last year destroyed nearly all of its crops, much of its livestock, and many of the roads that farmers need to get their goods to market. Even before the storms, Haiti only grew 40 percent of the food it needed. After years of coups, violence, mismanagement, and corruption, the challenges facing Haiti are enormous: environmental catastrophe, poverty, hunger, illiteracy, unemployment, and continuing violence. But is the kind of help the world has given so far what Haiti needs most? Many Haitians rightfully feel that international intervention in Haiti doesn't always benefit Haiti as much as it should; funds are perpetually short, priorities not always well thought out, and the participation of Haitians in the decision process limited. How can the international community do better by Haiti? Can Haiti and the Dominican Republic, which share the island of Hispaniola, put behind them centuries of conflicts and work together to solve mutual problems? What should the priorities be for former President Bill Clinton, recently named UN Special Envoy to Haiti, as a new champion for the Caribbean nation?

 

Wed 10/14

12 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven College Auditorium

 

Video

 

"Aristide and the Endless Revolution"

Aristide and the Endless Revolution: Documentary

Nicolas Rossier's powerful and informative documentary focuses on Aristide's later years as president of Haiti, as he struggled to fulfill his promises of reform in the face of mounting domestic opposition (driven in large part by business and military interests) and an increasingly hostile relationship with the United States. watch: Trailer

 

Wed 10/13

7pm

Fairhaven College Auditorium

"Rwanda Yesterday & Today - End Genocide in Darfur Tomorrow."

Carl Wilkens

Carl Wilkens, former Director of Adventist Development and Relief Agency, Rwanda

 

As the only American who chose to remain in Rwanda after the genocide began in 1994, his story reminds us of the profound connection between history and the moral choices we face each day. Wilkens puts a human “face” on genocide, showing us that the perpetrators, victims, and resistors will not soon be forgotten, and teaching us how one person really can make a difference. Currently on a Pedaling2Peace tour across the country, Wilkens and his wife are not only creating awareness and educating regarding the atrocities in Rwanda and now Darfur, they are also speaking on how to take action.

 

video: Watch Wilkens in an excerpt of "Ghosts of Rwanda" (scroll down to "The Last American Left" at the bottom of the page.)

 

Wed 10/21

12 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven College Auditorium

 

Video

"A Son's Search for his Jewish Past in Kurdish Iraq"

Ariel SabarAriel Sabar, award winning journalist

In a remote corner of the world, forgotten for nearly three thousand years, lived an enclave of Kurdish Jews so isolated that they still spoke Aramaic, the language of Jesus. Mostly illiterate, they were self-made mystics and gifted storytellers and humble peddlers who dwelt in harmony with their Muslim and Christian neighbors in the mountains of northern Iraq. To these descendants of the Lost Tribes of Israel, Yona Sabar was born. Yona's son Ariel grew up in Los Angeles, where Yona had become an esteemed professor, dedicating his career to preserving his people's traditions. Ariel wanted nothing to do with his father's strange immigrant heritage--until he had a son of his own. Ariel Sabar brings to life the ancient town of Zakho, discovering his family's place in the sweeping saga of Middle-Eastern history in his recent book: My Father's Paradise.

 

Wed 10/28

12 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven College Auditorium

 

Video unavailable

 

"Immigrant Youth's Contributions to Families and Society as Language and Culture Brokers"

Marjorie Faulstich OrellanaMarjorie Faulstich Orellana. Professor and Director of Faculty for the Teacher Education Program, University of California, LA

Wednesday, November 4, Noon-1:20pm, Fairhaven College Auditorium

When we consider the relative costs and contributions of immigrants to U.S. society, the general assumption is that adults make contributions, while children are only a drain: they "take" from the educational and health systems without giving anything back. This is an assumption that bears reconsideration. In this talk I show how society benefits from the largely invisible work and unremun- erated that the children of immigrants do as language and culture brokers. I argue that this is part of the labor cost equation that should be contemplated in this era of global economic restructuring. Using illustrations from ethnographic data in three immigrant communities over a decade, I show children at work in a variety of contexts and discuss how children experience their work.

 

Wed

12 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven College Auditorium

 

Video

 

"A Woman Among Warlords: The Extraordinary Story of the Afghan Woman Who Dares to Speak Out"

Malalai JoyaMalalai Joya, Afghan Woman Activist and Suspended Parliamentarian

Thursday, November 12, Noon-1:30pm. WWU Campus, Arntzen 100

Malalai Joya who was the youngest member of the Afghan Parliament elected in the 2005 elections, was subsequently suspended from parliament for labelling it full of warlords. On a U.S. tour with her memoir,"A Woman Among Warlords" (Scribner), her book provides a true picture of young Afghans going through the occupation, the troubles of refugee camps and the feelings of these people towards those warlords who are once again ruling and not giving chance to the new generation to come forward and control their destiny. Reviews: ‘The youngest and most famous of all the women in the Afghan parliament...a powerful symbol of change’ – Guardian. . ‘A fascinating account of Afghanistan’s political reality…Malalai Joya has been compared to Burma’s Aung San Suu Kyi’ - Irish Times. ‘A courageous female MP’ - The Times.‘ [Has] spoken her mind as few Afghan women dare to do’ - New York Times .

 

Wed

12 - 1:20pm

WWU Campus, Arntzen 100

 

Video

 

"Immigration & National Security: Reframing the Post 9/11 Debate"

Margaret StockMargaret Stock is an attorney admitted in Alaska; a Lieutenant Colonel in the Military Police Corps, US Army Reserve; and an Associate Professor assigned to the Department of Social Sciences, US Military Academy, West Point, New York

 

After September 11, 2001, the United States implemented sweeping changes in its immigration policies in an effort to prevent future terrorist attacks on American soil. Some of these immigration policy changes have enhanced US national security, while others, ironically, have undermined it. What key post-9/11 changes in immigration policy have been effective, and which ones have not? How should we gauge the effectiveness of national-security related immigration policies? What future changes to US immigration policies will best serve US national security?

 

Wed 11/18

12 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven College Auditorium

 

Video

 

Babafemi Akinrinade [see full faculty profile]

Babafemi Akinrinade came to Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of Chicago's Human Rights Program and Center for International Studies where he was a post-doctoral instructor for two years. He holds the LL.M. and J.S.D. degrees in International Human Rights Law of the University of Notre Dame Law School, as well as the LL.B. and LL.M. degrees of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. He was a fellow at the Center for Civil and Human Rights, Notre Dame Law School (2005-2006) and from 2003-2004, he was the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow (and co-Instructor) for the Sawyer Seminar on Comparative Truth and Reconciliation Process at the Center for International Human Rights, Northwestern University Law School, Chicago. He was admitted to the Nigerian Bar in 1988, and between 1992 and 2002, he was a Lecturer in Law at the Faculty of Law, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria (1992-2002). His research interests include state collapse and human rights, transitional justice, international humanitarian law, and the political, security and socio-economic relations of African States. His recent book is Human Rights and State Collapse in Africa, Eleven International Publishing (February 5, 2009)

Ernesto Sagás

Ernesto Sagás, PhD, Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at Colorado State University. He has a Ph.D. in political science from University of Florida and specializes on Latina/o politics, transnational migration, and Latin American politics. Dr. Sagás is the author of Race and Politics in the Dominican Republic, and co-editor of The Dominican People: A Documentary History and Dominican Migration: Transnational Perspectives. Currently, he is completing a book on overseas voting among U.S. Latina/o immigrants, and is about to embark on a research project on the current immigration debate and the U.S.-Mexico border. Dr. Sagás has also been a political analyst for CNN in Spanish since 2004, commenting on issues ranging from U.S. domestic politics and elections, to foreign affairs.

Michele Wucker

Executive Director of the World Policy Institute, a nonpartisan center for progressive global policy research and thought leadership which publishes the widely cited and highly respected quarterly magazine, World Policy Journal. She is the author of LOCKOUT: Why America Keeps Getting Immigration Wrong When Our Prosperity Depends on Getting It Right (Public Affairs 2006/paperback 2007; a Washington Post Book World "Best Nonfiction of 2006″ Selection) and Why the Cocks Fight: Dominicans, Haitians and the Struggle For Hispaniola (FSG/Hill & Wang, 1999). Michele received a 2007 Guggenheim Fellowship for her work on changing views of citizenship, exclusion, and belonging. A sought-after public speaker, Michele lectures frequently about immigration, cross-cultural conflict and conciliation, and Caribbean politics. In addition, she has been a source for major U.S. and international media including The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Reuters, CNN, CNBC, Fox News, MSNBC, National Public Radio and Public Radio International. Formerly Latin America bureau chief for International Financing Review, Michele has written for many U.S. and Latin American publications including The American Prospect, America Economia, The Guardian, Internationale Politik, Newsday, The New York Times, Texas Observer, Valor Economico, Tikkun, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and World Policy Journal. Michele is an advisor to Batey Relief Alliance and the Dominican Republic Education and Mentoring (DREAM) Project. She is a graduate of Rice University and of Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs.

 

Carl Wilkens

As a humanitarian aid worker with the Adventist Church, he moved his young family to Rwanda in the spring of 1990. When the genocide was launched in April 1994, Wilkens refused to leave, even when urged to do so by close friends, his church and the United States government. He was the only American to remain in the country, though thousands of expatriates evacuated and the United Nations pulled out most of their troops. Venturing out each day into streets crackling with mortars and gunfire, Wilkens worked his way through roadblocks of angry, bloodstained soldiers and civilians armed with machetes and assault rifles in order to bring food, water, and medicines to groups of orphans trapped around the city. His actions saved the lives of hundreds. In 2004 PBS Frontline aired a documentary on the Rwanda genocide: "Ghosts of Rwanda" which included some of Wilkens' genocide experiences. Five years later, literature, history, political science, international studies and other teachers continue using this film in classrooms across the country. They continue to email Wilkens with invitations to come speak in their schools. In January 2008, with no end in sight to the ongoing genocide in Darfur, Wilkens left his job in Oregon to dedicate himself fulltime to accepting these invitations. He and his wife Teresa have since formed an educational non-profit "World Outside My Shoes" to facilitate this work.

 

Ariel Sabar

Ariel Sabar is an award-winning former staff writer for the Baltimore Sun and the Providence (RI) Journal. His work has also appeared in the New York Times, the Christian Science Monitor, the Washington Monthly, Moment, Mother Jones magazine, and other publications. He lives with his wife and two children in Washington, D.C.

 

Marjorie Faulstich Orellana

Professor and Director of Faculty for the Teacher Education Program at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research documenting the multitude of ways in which children use their knowledge of two languages and cultures to read, write, speak, listen and do things for their immigrant families--"language brokering"--is reported in the book Translating Childhoods: Immigrant Youth, Language and Culture. as well as in such journals including American Anthropologist, Reading Research Quarterly, Harvard Educational Review, Anthropology and Education Quarterly, Journal of Bilingualism and Bilingual Education, Journal of Adolescent Development, Social Problems, Educational Researcher, and Linguistics and Education.

 

Malalai Joya

Malalai Joya has been called "the bravest woman in Afghanistan." At a constitutional assembly in Kabul in 2003, she stood up and denounced her country's powerful NATO-backed warlords. She was twenty-five years old. Two years later, she became the youngest person elected to Afghanistan's new Parliament. In 2007, she was suspended from Parliament for her persistent criticism of the warlords and drug barons and their cronies. She has survived four assassination attempts to date, is accompanied at all times by armed guards, and sleeps only in safe houses. Often compared to democratic leaders such as Burma's Aung San Suu Kyi, this extraordinary young woman was raised in the refugee camps of Iran and Pakistan. Inspired in part by her father's activism, Malalai became a teacher in secret girls' schools, holding classes in a series of basements. She hid her books under her burqa so the Taliban couldn't find them. She also helped establish a free medical clinic and orphanage in her impoverished home province of Farah.

 

Margaret Stock

Margaret Stock is an attorney admitted in Alaska; a Lieutenant Colonel in the Military Police Corps, US Army Reserve; and an Associate Professor (Drilling Individual Mobilization Augmentee) assigned to the Department of Social Sciences, US Military Academy, West Point, New York. She received her undergraduate (A.B., Government) degree from Harvard-Radcliffe in 1985; her J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1992; and her Master's in Public Administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 2001. Ms. Stock also earned a Master's in Strategic Studies from the Army War College in 2006. She has written extensively and testified before Congress on issues involving immigration and national security. For the past year, she has been working almost exclusively on immigration policy issues for the Department of the Army and the Department of Defense. Ms. Stock also serves on the ABA Commission on Immigration and the Council on Foreign Relations Independent Task Force on US Immigration Policy. She is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Border Research Policy Institute at Western Washington University.

 

CO-SPONSORS

Fairhaven College is grateful to our valued co-sponsors for Fall 2009 World Issues:

Mark Lehmann, American Cultural Studies, Anthropology, Canadian-American Studies, Center for Law, Diversity & Justice, Cold Beverage Fund, Communications, International Programs and Exchanges, Political Science, Women's Studies.