Special Education—P-12 Plus Content Endorsement

The Department of Special Education and Education Leadership is proud to offer a dual endorsement program for students who are interested in becoming middle school and high school teachers. Graduates from this unique program will have a teaching credential, a Special Education Endorsement (Preschool through 21 years), and an endorsement in another qualified secondary school level content area. The majority of our graduates have earned the secondary content endorsement in English, Mathematics, or Science but other options are available.

Since the education of all children is a worthy cause, we provide a carefully sequenced series of coursework that balances content knowledge with numerous opportunities to apply the knowledge and develop skills in a wide range of settings. Given that teaching is a demanding profession, we seek to prepare our students with the skills needed to effectively assess and teach academic skills as well as effectively manage the classroom environment in a positive and respectful manner.

Western’s Special Education program is consistent with state and national standards. It is based upon best evidence-based and research-based practices. Our curriculum includes an emphasis on Curriculum-Based Evaluation (for academic, social-emotional, and behavioral areas) within a tiered system of support framework.

Interested in working with individuals with disabilities, but not quite sure? Please feel free to contact someone in the Department of Special Education and Education Leadership. You might even be interested in our GUR course, EDUC 205 Disability, Diversity and Media.

The Special Education Department is part of Woodring College of Education

Beyond the Classroom

Practicum Placements and Internships

The college faculty coordinate a wide range of school and community based practicum placements strategically placed throughout the program. This provides frequent opportunities to interact with young children while developing your teaching skills. The final quarter internship (student teaching) experience is coordinated by the department and in conjunction with the Office of Field Experiences.

Professional Development

Teacher education candidates are expected to participate in professional development activities outside of the classroom setting. These activities are varied and may include events such as professional development alongside practicing teachers in the local schools, attendance at selected informational talks or workshops.

Compass 2 Campus

The State of Washington mentoring initiative at Western is designed to increase opportunities in higher education by providing mentoring for 5th – 12th grade students from traditionally underrepresented and diverse backgrounds in Whatcom and Skagit counties. For more information on the program, visit this website.

Reading Tutor

Woodring employs Western student to work as reading tutors in local elementary schools. For more information on the program, visit this website.

Careers and Graduate Studies

Our graduates are actively recruited from districts and agencies across the state for both special education and/or elementary education positions. There has been a national shortage of Special Education teachers since 1975 and districts in Washington State continually strive to find qualified teachers, often forced to look out of state. We, in the department, are particularly proud of our graduates and the work they do in school and communities supporting students who experience the most difficulty learning.

Our graduates are also actively sought by numerous graduate programs and have been allowed to transfer some of their coursework into the graduate school. So, whether you plan to continue in the classroom or move to the university setting, you will be well prepared and maintain a competitive edge.

 

Sample Careers

  • Special Education Resource Room Teacher 
  • Special Education Teacher 
  • Consultant 
  • Inclusive Classroom Teacher

Department of Special Education and Education Leadership

Special Education P-12 and Elementary Education (Dual Endorsement)

The Department of Special Education and Education Leadership is proud to announce that we were granted national accreditation for the P-12 Special Education Endorsement after successfully completing a rigorous review process through our professional organization, The Council for Exceptional Children. Graduates from the program receive a teaching license as well as endorsements in both Special Education and Elementary Education.

This dual endorsement program offered through the Department of Special Education and Education Leadership prepares aspiring teachers to work with students with disabilities from Preschool through age 21 as well as work as a general education teacher in a regular elementary classroom. Since the education of all children is a worthy cause, we provide a carefully sequenced series of coursework that balances content knowledge with numerous opportunities to apply the knowledge and develop skills in a wide range of settings. Given that teaching is a demanding profession, we prepare our students with the skills needed to effectively assess and teach academic skills as well as effectively manage the classroom environment in a positive and respectful manner.

The Special Education and Elementary Education departments are part of the Woodring College of Education

Quinn Reno
Recent Graduate

“The academic challenges I faced in middle school created my passion for working with students who experience learning difficulties. I believe all students should receive the support they need to thrive as learners.”

 

 

Western’s Special Education program is consistent with state and national standards. It is based upon best evidence-based and research-based practices. Our curriculum includes an emphasis on Curriculum-Based Evaluation (for academic, social-emotional, and behavioral areas) within a tiered system of support framework.

There are two common views of Special Education. The first is simply the education of students with exceptionalities. While this is true, we believe that the following definition better reflects our perspective: The application of exceptional teaching that benefits students with and without disabilities.

Interested in working with individuals with disabilities, but not quite sure? Please feel free to contact someone in the Department of Special Education and Education Leadership. You might even be interested in our GUR course, EDUC 205 Disability, Diversity and Media.

 

Beyond the Classroom

Practicum Placements and Internships

The college faculty coordinate a wide range of school and community based practicum placements strategically placed throughout the program. This provides frequent opportunities to interact with young children while developing your teaching skills. The final quarter internship (student teaching) experience is coordinated by the department and in conjunction with the Office of Field Experiences.

Professional Development

Teacher education candidates are expected to participate in professional development activities outside of the classroom setting. These activities are varied and may include events such as professional development alongside practicing teachers in the local schools, attendance at selected informational talks or workshops.

Compass 2 Campus

The State of Washington mentoring initiative at Western is designed to increase opportunities in higher education by providing mentoring for 5th – 12th grade students from traditionally underrepresented and diverse backgrounds in Whatcom and Skagit counties. For more information on the program, visit this website.

Reading Tutor

Woodring employs Western student to work as reading tutors in local elementary schools. For more information on the program, visit this website.

Careers and Graduate Studies

Our graduates are actively recruited from districts and agencies across the state for both special education and/or elementary education positions. There has been a national shortage of Special Education teachers since 1975 and districts in Washington State continually strive to find qualified teachers, often forced to look out of state. We, in the department, are particularly proud of our graduates and the work they do in school and communities supporting students who experience the most difficulty learning.

Our graduates are also actively sought by numerous graduate programs and have been allowed to transfer some of their coursework into the graduate school. So, whether you plan to continue in the classroom or move to the university setting, you will be well prepared and maintain a competitive edge.

 

Sample Careers

  • Special Education Teacher
  • Elementary Education Teacher
  • Special Education Teacher P-12
  • Transition Teacher
  • Specialized Program Teacher
  • Behavior Interventionist

Department of Special Education and Education Leadership

Recreation

The purpose of recreation and leisure is to contribute to the health and well-being of individuals and to enhance the quality of community life. The Recreation major is multidisciplinary, requiring understanding of the social, behavioral, physical, and environmental sciences as they pertain to helping people grow and develop in their leisure while conserving our vital natural resources. Knowledge of the arts and humanities is just as important, because leisure is one of the most fertile opportunities for self-expression and the development of community.

Nationally accredited since 1986 by the Council on Parks, Recreation and Tourism, the Recreation Program offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Recreation. The major offers concentrations in tourism, community recreation, outdoor recreation, and therapeutic recreation. The department and faculty goal is to help students become knowledgeable, competent, and virtuous professionals — the sum of which is a foundation for professional excellence.

The Recreation curriculum prepares students to design, implement, manage, lead, and evaluate recreation programs and services. The program is designed as four sequential 15-16 credit hour phases, which students move through as a cohort group. Students enter Phase 1 of the program during spring quarter, typically during their sophomore or junior year.

The Health and Human Development Department is part of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

Beyond the Classroom

Each student in the Recreation Program must complete 240 hours of leadership prior to beginning their internship in Phase III of the program.  That equates to an average of 10,000 hours of student service per year to organizations that serve individuals, families, communities, and the environment in Bellingham and throughout Washington.  In recent years, our students have served the YMCA, the Max Higbee Center, Boys and Girls Club, Arne Hannah Aquatic Center, Whatcom Humane Society, and Northwest Therapeutic Riding Center to name just a few. In addition, students complete a 400-hour, ten-week internship experience. In the department's 2014 Exit Survey, 97% of graduating students rated the Internship as “Very Important” or “Important” to their professional growth.

“I have been teaching in the Recreation Program at Western since 1980, and have witnessed some extraordinary - almost magical - moments as students discover how their beliefs and behaviors have the potential to enrich the lives of others.”

-Jill Heckathorn, Former Recreation Faculty

 

Careers and Graduate Studies

In support of healthy individuals, families, and communities, career opportunities in recreation and leisure services are numerous and diverse. Graduates of the Recreation Program are employed throughout the region, nation, and world. They work in a variety of settings, including public recreation departments, outdoor recreation programs, hospitals, and tourism agencies. Specific jobs performed by graduates include working as recreation therapists, organizing and leading outdoor adventure trips, managing youth-serving agencies, such as Boys and Girls Clubs, supervising public sports programs, coordinating community cultural arts, operating eco-tourism trips, and serving as park rangers with state and federal agencies, and managing youth-serving agencies, such as Boys and Girls Clubs. Some graduates have found their degrees useful for work in fields such as social work, the ministry, and law enforcement.

Employers of Recent Western Graduates:

  • Alderwood Convalescent Center (Bellingham, WA)
  • Alpengirl Summer Adventure Camp for Girls (Bozeman, MT)
  • AmeriCorps (CO)
  • Boys and Girls Club (Phoenix, AZ)
  • Camp Wingate Kirkland (Yarmouth Port, MA)
  • Celebrity Cruises
  • Chena Hot Springs Resort (Fairbanks, AK)
  • Earthcorps (Seattle)
  • Holland American Cruiseline
  • Jackson Hole Mountain Resort (Jackson, WY)
  • Lacey Parks and Recreation (Lacey)
  • Metro Parks (Tacoma)
  • Mount Baker Ski Area
  • Mount Rainier National Park
  • NOLS Pacific Northwest (Conway)
  • Outward Bound (CA)
  • Skydive Snohomish (Snohomish)
  • Wild Whatcom (Bellingham)

 

Sample Careers

  • Recreation Therapist 
  • Outdoor Adventure Leader 
  • Youth Programs Coordinator 
  • Eco-tourism Operator 
  • Park Ranger

Department of Health and Human Development - Recreation

Journalism—Public Relations

Journalism is the work of supplying content, primarily news, for the ever-expanding world of mass media. Journalists are responsible for gathering information, analyzing and editing it for a mass audience, and dispensing it using some form of media platform. Increasingly the methods of distribution have become more complex, but the basic mission of a journalist remains the same: to serve the public by finding, defining, writing, and editing information. 

Journalism — Public Relations majors at Western study theoretical and practical communications in a liberal arts setting. Students gain practical experience on Western’s award-winning student media, and majors additionally take field internships with newspapers, magazines, broadcast stations, public relations agencies, and other professional organizations. Courses in the Public Relations sequence follow the News-Editorial emphasis, adding communication skills important for careers in this rapidly growing field. 

Western’s Journalism Department is part of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

“[Western’s] public relations program is rooted in professionalism. We don't only learn theory, we spend time doing hands-on activities and preparing for what the real world of public relations will be like.”

-Emily Willeman, Alumni

Beyond the Classroom

While enrolled in the Journalism program, students are offered a number of learning opportunities including working as writers, photographers, or editors on University Publications; learning from industry professionals; and working hand-on with community organizations to gain experience in the field. 

Student publications at Western include the weekly newspaper, The Western Front; the quarterly magazine, Klipsun; and the quarterly environmental magazine, The Planet. Policy for the publications is set by the Student Publications Council, and the majority of the funding is from student fees. All Western students are eligible to participate in publications staff work.  

 

 

Careers and Graduate Studies

Few fields of study prepare students for as wide a range of interesting and challenging careers. Journalists first and foremost learn to write, accumulate, and analyze information. Skills from the Journalism major are in demand in a host of fields beyond traditional mass media. 

Employers of Recent Western Graduates: 

  • Freelance: Digital Marketing Consultant 
  • Gemini Fish Market: Fish Monger and Marketing Assistant 
  • KTVZ News Channel 21: Reporter/Producer 
  • McKinney Trailer Rentals: Marketing Assistant 
  • Microsoft: Recruiting Coordinator 
  • Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum: Induction Show Coordinator 
  • Nordstrom: Director Marketing Planner Accessories/WSP
  • Revolution PR: Account Associate 
  • Tosten Marketing: Social media manager and Creative Content

Sample Careers

  • Reporter 
  • Editor 
  • Customer Service Representative 
  • Public Relations Specialist 
  • Community Relations 
  • Director 
  • TV News Anchor 
  • Speech Writer 
  • Advertising Copywriter 
  • Copywriter 
  • Market Research Analyst 
  • Lobbyist 
  • Photojournalist 
  • Designer 
  • Multimedia Producer 
  • Communications Specialist

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Industrial Technology—Vehicle Design

The Industrial Technology — Vehicle Design program prepares graduates for design, product development and manufacturing in the automotive, marine, aerospace, composites, and alternative fuel industries. The program uses hands-on vehicle research, design and development projects to educate students, and students gain an understanding of the tools, materials and processes used in industry. 

Vehicle designers draft layouts for automobile components, assemblies, and systems using sketches, models, and prototypes from their knowledge of engineering principles, based on automobile function. The work of an auto designer combines artistry with technical and scientific know-how. The finished designs incorporate aesthetic and functional concerns within the practical framework of business and manufacturing.

Western is also home to the Vehicle Research Institute (VRI). The institute focuses on complete vehicle design and fabrication and developing hybrid electrical and natural gas/biomethane vehicle technology. More than 50 vehicles have been built by VRI students since 1972.

The Engineering and Design Department is part of the College of Science and Engineering.

 

Beyond the Classroom

During their senior year, Industrial Technology-Vehicle Design students design and implement a project of their choosing, integrating their coursework in a self-directed culminating project. Check out projects that students recently have worked on.

Vehicle Research Institute student teams have set records around Indianapolis Motor Speedway, up Pike’s Peak and across the Australian Outback with a class win in the 1990 World Solar Challenge. A recent team was the only U.S. university-based team in the finals of the Progressive Automotive X Prize — a $10 million prize to build a 100-mile per gallon car. NASA has also displayed a Western vehicle at its Ames Research Labs in California.

Western has two student academic clubs housed within the Vehicle Research Institute that compete in national competitions: WWU Formula SAE and WWU SAE Baja. Participation on both teams provides excellent interdisciplinary, hands-on learning experiences, along with professional networking opportunities. 

Careers and Graduate Studies

Graduates enter a wide range of industry sectors including: automotive, racing, aerospace, marine, heavy duty vehicle, composites, prototype design and manufacturing, computer numerically controlled machining and biofuels. Vehicle Design alumni hold positions with all the major automotive equipment manufacturers and custom car-building companies, as well as positions as stylists. 

Employers of Recent Western Graduates: 

  • Aircraft Rubber Manufacturing: R&D Engineer 
  • Bullfrog Boat’s Inc.: Concept Designer and Main Assembler 
  • Honda 
  • Girodisc: Assembly Technician 
  • GM 
  • Metal Crafters 
  • Nissan Design 
  • PACCAR Technical Center: Materials Coordinator 
  • Porsche 
  • SpaceX
  • Toyota 
  • Volvo

Sample Careers

  • Stylists 
  • Performance and Development 
  • Custom Car Building 
  • OBD Validation Engineer

College of Science and Engineering (was Sciences and Technology)

Financial Economics

The study of Financial Economics is a combination of economic analysis and tools from accounting and finance that can be used to guide financial decisions. Financial Economics provides an understanding of core economic concepts and how the economy and financial markets function. 

The Economics Department and the Department of Finance and Marketing jointly offer this major to provide a program which gives students rigorous training in theory and applications of accounting, economics, and finance.  An emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking skills to apply economic and financial analysis in problem solving. This major is designed for students interested in both economics and finance, and is aimed particularly at those who wish to pursue careers in corporate finance, financial analysis, insurance and real estate, and government agencies where special emphasis is placed on financial economic knowledge.

Western’s Economics Department and the Department of Finance and Marketing are part of the College of Business and Economics.

Beyond the Classroom

The WWU Student Economics Association (SEA) is a student-led club that promotes the development of skills to lead members’ transition into the job sector. The club coordinates events to help guide and inspire innovative thinking for economics students and business students alike.

Careers and Graduate Studies

Western graduates have gained employment as: 

  • Payroll Compliance Auditor: Lindquist LLP
  • Outbound Group Leader: Target
  • Fiscal Coordinator: First Choice in Home Care 
  • Dealer Services Management Associate: KeyBank
  • Broker: The Rants Group 
  • Replenishment Analyst: Smith Gardens 
  • Revenue Auditor: WA State Department of Revenue 

 

Sample Careers

  • Actuary 
  • Financial Planner/Analyst 
  • Government 
  • Investment Banker 
  • Budget Analyst 
  • Banking/Securities 
  • Financial Economist 
  • Business Forecaster

College of Business and Economics

Design

Design is the visual communication of ideas. Western's Design program emphasizes the process of problem solving and encourages students to make connections between culture and design, and their role as visual communicators. Students learn to combine personal expression and critical thinking as they create solutions that connect industry to an audience and themselves to the world. 

Western's program is unique in its size and depth of curriculum. Students have significant opportunities to work with their faculty outside of class. Western’s Design faculty members are active in the profession, but place teaching first and foremost in their activities. Because industry expects designers to be fluid in both traditional print based graphic design and interaction design (web/app), the Design program does not offer areas of specialization within its curriculum. 

Western's design production lab provides students access to equipment found in the industry and establishes a learning environment that allows for hands-on education. Through the lab, students have access to: hand and power guillotine paper cutters, foil-stamping, various mechanical and perfect binding units, offset and photopolymer plate making units, medium and large format inkjet printers, two Vandercook proofing letterpresses as well as a Heidelberg GTO offset press.  

Western offers both Bachelor of Arts (BA) and a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degrees in Design. The BFA is the professional degree option for students admitted to the Design Program. The BFA degree option is a highly competitive degree limited to a maximum of 18 students per year. Courses in the senior year focus on the integration of graphic, production and digital media design in the solution of visual communication problems. 

Anelese Webster
Design Major

“I have had the best professors who have taught me, guided me and prepared me to enter the professional world of design. The confidence and skills I learned at Western have allowed me to feel that I can make a significant impact in the world of design.”

Anelese participated in the 100 Portfolio Night of the Art Director’s Club that takes place in 26 cities around the world. She signed up for the New York event because she wanted to work in New York City upon graduation. She was selected as the top portfolio and was also hired by the design firm Huge that sponsored the event.

 

Beyond the Classroom

The Design BFA seniors travel to San Francisco for the annual Design field trip. Recently, the students visited the following firms: Chronicle Books, Elixir, Hatch, Highlight, Hybrid, Manual, McSweenys, Neo, Public, Salesforce, and Volume.

Completing an internship is a requirement for Design BFA students. Faculty members are responsible for finding firms that meet department expectations for this experience, then contracts are negotiated so all parties are aware of what is expected of each other. This is a paid internship that happens during the summer. Since the internship is required during summer quarter, students earn enough money to pay for their summer tuition (10 credits) and have something left over. The department strives to find local quality design sponsors for student convenience. 

Recent BFA Student Internship Firms: 

  • Curator 
  • Ratio 
  • LiveAreaLabs
  • Ten Gun Design 
  • Push Design 
  • Disney 
  • Smashing Ideas  
  • Superfeet
  • Toolhouse  
  • Highlight (San Francisco) 

Through coursework and a variety of on-and-off-campus opportunities, Western Design students build on their skills while adding to their portfolios (check on this gallery of student work). Campus-wide opportunities are available through the VU Publicity Center, Klipsun Magazine, The Planet Magazine, Jeopardy Magazine, Labyrinth Literary and Fine Arts Magazine, and more. Students also have the opportunity to earn credit while studying abroad over a summer.

Careers and Graduate Studies

Career opportunities are found in all segments of industry, both in the private and public sector. Western Design graduates go on to work in advertising agencies, design firms, in-house departments, paper companies, printing firms, and serve as private consultants in corporate identity, environmental graphic design, packaging, publication, and web design. Many graduates work as Designers, Art Educators, Production Managers, Web Designers, and Digital Image Makers.

Some employers of recent Western graduates include:

  • Amazon (Seattle, WA): Interactive Designer 
  • Creativebug (San Fancisco, CA): Digital Designer 
  • Facebook (San Fancisco, CA): Product Designer
  • Nordstrom (Seattle, WA): Web Designer 
  • TranTech Engineering (Bellingham, WA): Designer, Marketer, AudoCAD

Sample Careers

  • Graphic Designer
  • Web Designer
  • Project Manager
  • Art Director
  • Digital Image Maker 
  • Creative Director
  • Interactive Designer
  • UX/UI

 

Design

Design is the visual communication of ideas. Western's Design program emphasizes the process of problem solving and encourages students to make connections between culture and design, and their role as visual communicators. Students learn to combine personal expression and critical thinking as they create solutions that connect industry to an audience and themselves to the world. 

Western's program is unique in its size and depth of curriculum. Students have significant opportunities to work with their faculty outside of class. Western’s Design faculty members are active in the profession, but place teaching first and foremost in their activities. Because industry expects designers to be fluid in both traditional print based graphic design and interaction design (web/app), the Design program does not offer areas of specialization within its curriculum. 

Western's design production lab provides students access to equipment found in the industry and establishes a learning environment that allows for hands-on education. Through the lab, students have access to: hand and power guillotine paper cutters, foil-stamping, various mechanical and perfect binding units, offset and photopolymer plate making units, medium and large format inkjet printers, two Vandercook proofing letterpresses as well as a Heidelberg GTO offset press.  

Western offers both Bachelor of Arts (BA) and a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degrees in Design. The BFA is the professional degree option for students admitted to the Design Program. The BFA degree option is a highly competitive degree limited to a maximum of 18 students per year. Courses in the senior year focus on the integration of graphic production and digital media design in the solution of visual communication problems. 

 

Anelese Webster
Design Major

“I have had the best professors who have taught me, guided me and prepared me to enter the professional world of design. The confidence and skills I have learned at Western have allowed me to feel that I can make a significant impact in the world of design.”

Anelese participated in the 100 Portfolio Night of the Art Director’s Club that takes place in 26 cities around the world. She signed up for the New York event because she wanted to work in New York City upon graduation. She was selected as the top portfolio and was also hired by the design firm Huge that sponsored the event.

Beyond the Classroom

Design students earn internship credit working with design firms, and receive support and professional connections as they pursue internships that match their interests. Students also have the opportunity to earn credit while studying abroad over a summer.

Through coursework and a variety of on- and off-campus opportunities, Western Design students build on their skills while adding to their portfolios (check on this gallery of student work). Campus-wide opportunities are available through the VU Publicity Center, Klipsun Magazine, The Planet Magazine, Jeopardy Magazine, Labyrinth Literary and Fine Arts Magazine, and more. The department also receives a large number of requests from off-campus partners for design work.

Careers and Graduate Studies

Career opportunities are found in all segments of industry, both in the private and public sector. Western Design graduates go on to work in advertising agencies, design firms, in-house departments, paper companies, printing firms, and serve as private consultants in corporate identity, environmental graphic design, packaging, publication, and web design. Many graduates work as designers, art educators, production managers, web designers, and digital image makers. 

Some employers of recent Western graduates include: 

  • Amazon (Seattle, WA): Interactive Designer 
  • Creativebug (San Fancisco, CA): Digital Designer
  • Cinco (Portland, OR): Brand Designer 
  • Facebook (San Fancisco, CA): Product Designer
  • Nordstrom (Seattle, WA): Web Designer 
  • Starbucks Technology (Seattle, WA): Designer
  • Artefact (Seattle, WA): Designer
  • Teague (Seattle, WA): Visual Designer
  • Fantagraphics Books (Seattle, WA): Junior Designer 
  • Lineage Media and Solutions (Seattle, WA): Graphic Designer
  • Ticketfly (San Francico, CA): Visual Design Associate

Sample Careers

  • Graphic Designer
  • Web Designer
  • Project Manager
  • Art Director
  • Digital Image Maker 
  • Creative Director
  • Interactive Designer
  • UX/UI

Business Administration—Operations Management Concentration

Western's Business Administration programs explore leadership roles in business and the community, providing students with the perceptual and analytical skills necessary  to make decisions and evaluate policies in business, and develop an understanding of the social, economic, and regulatory environments in business. All  students earning a degree in Business Administration develop significant understanding of  management information systems and computing.

Operations Management determines what equipment, labor, tools, facilities, materials, energy, and information are required, how these can best be obtained, and how they are used to satisfy the requirements of the market place. Operations managers are concerned with each step in providing a service or product — from acquisition of the raw materials and component parts to delivery to the customer. Operations managers are also responsible for critical activities such as quality management and control, capacity planning, materials management, purchasing, and scheduling.

The Operations Management program and Decision Sciences Department are part of the College of Business and Economics.

 

Beyond the Classroom

Most companies are looking for people with real world experience, which is why Western students receive encouragement and support in finding relevant internships. Student internships often provide valuable industry connections and can lead to a job offer after graduation. 

Students can also join Western's Chapter of APICS — the Association for Operations Management. APICS provides support and supplemental education to students, hosting weekly meetings and special events open to any that would like to attend. Club activities link the students' academic education to current developments within industry. Activities include: 

  • Industry professional speakers 
  • Professional development meetings
  • Facility tours
  • Simulation exercises
  • Career skill workshops

 

Careers and Graduate Studies

The Department of Decision Sciences opens the door to a variety of high-tech jobs. Graduates work for firms as analysts, finding flaws and creating a more efficient and streamlined approaches for their clients. Work settings can range from deep inside a datacenter server room to a system consultant overseeing production in a foreign country. 

Recent Student Internships: 

  • ChemPoint.com 
  • Fluke
  • Superfeet

Employers of Recent Western Graduates: 

  • B/E Aerospace: Buyer 
  • Boeing Defense, Space, and Security: Procurement Agent 
  • Cascade DAFO: Digital Modifier 
  • Eritrean Association of Greater Seattle: Community Relations Manager 
  • Fluke: Production Master Scheduler and OSP Scheduler
  • ING Financial Partners: Investment Advisor Representative
  • JB Hunt Transport Services, Inc.: Carrier Sales Coordinator
  • Pearl Izumi: Systems Process Administrator

 

Sample Careers

  • Production Supervisor 
  • Quality Control Specialist 
  • Inventory Control Specialist 
  • Administrator 
  • Operations Manager 
  • Buyer 
  • Supply Chain Consultant 
  • Logistics Manager

Department of Decision Sciences

Business Administration—Marketing Concentration

Western's Business Administration majors explore leadership roles in business and the community, providing students with the perceptual and analytical skills necessary  to make decisions and evaluate policies in business, and to develop understanding of the social, economic, and regulatory environments in business. All  students earning a degree in Business Administration develop significant understanding of  management information systems and computing.  

While many people think marketing is all about sales and advertising, that perception is far from what marketing encompasses. Marketing means satisfying the wants and needs of customers by building mutually beneficial relationships between organizations and customers. By creating value for customers, marketers help increase the value of organizations. Marketing tools and strategies are used in both for-profit business and non-profit organizations. 

The Marketing Concentration provides students with coursework that is intellectually stimulating and directly useful in today's marketing profession. Students study marketing as it relates to a variety of activities in: new product development, pricing strategies and implementation, various communications including traditional advertising, digital media, personal selling, distribution, management of services, and brand management.

Western’s Finance and Marketing Department is part of the College of Business and Economics.

 

"While doing my internship in Hollywood, I learned that communication and confidence are the key to success.  You are a brand and you must learn how to make yourself known.  A marketing degree definitely helps with that."

–Samantha Jones, Katalyst Films

Beyond the Classroom

Students are strongly encouraged to take as many relevant electives as possible, participate in extracurricular activities and, most importantly, find a marketing internship. These experiences provide students with valuable contacts and experiences that will be meaningful to prospective employers. 

The Student Marketing Association (SMA) is a group of students looking to develop and practice the marketing skills learned in a classroom setting. SMA hosts professional readiness workshops, speakers, mixers, and other networking opportunities.

Careers and Graduate Studies

A degree in Marketing opens doors to numerous career opportunities. Nearly every area of business is somehow related to marketing, which provides students with a well-versed set of experiences and knowledge. 

Employers of Recent Western Graduates: 

  • Amazon: Technical Account Manager
  • Bigfin.com: Digital Marketing Assistant
  • FSR Wealth Managment: Client Services and Office Manager
  • SEO Works: Digital Analyst
  • Zillow: Marketing Account Manager
  • Windermere Real Estate: Broker
  • Allen Partners, Inc.: Marketing Coordinator and Operations Assistant 
  • Art Gamblin Motors: Digital Media Specialist 
  • Below the Boat: Marketing Director
  • K2: Web Developer and Marketing
  • Pandora Internet Radio: Marketing Coordinator
  • Razorfish: Assistant Media Planner

 

Sample Careers

  • Product and Brand Manager 
  • Marketing Research 
  • Advertising and Public Relation

Department of Finance and Marketing

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