Dance

Dance studies create a foundation for understanding and evaluating contemporary thinking about dance and related arts, while nurturing a physical and intellectual understanding of the language of movement.

Western Dance majors develop multiple skills that are essential in all fields, including self-discipline, collaboration, patience and problem-solving. The Dance BA is a broadly-based degree with a liberal arts orientation, and is designed for students with a general interest in dance and its applications. BA candidates focus on pedagogical and historic aspects of dance art as well as on the performance and generative components. 

Brynn Hofer
Dance Major

"The Dance faculty give so much of themselves to the dancers. They have such an innate ability to help their students that is quite inspiring – I hope to be that way with my students one day."

Beyond the Classroom

Performance opportunities for students include New Music/New Dance, Winter Dances, Cabaret and Dance In Concert. The department also brings in a number of guest artists throughout the year such as Amma and Kofi Anang West African Dance, and The Liz Gerring Dance Company.

 

“Students pursuing their BA in Dance at Western benefit from many performing opportunities, in both large and intimate theaters. Our faculty members – who are rotated through the various technique levels – are unique in that they not only have academic resumes, they have also been extensively involved in professional dance as dancers, choreographers, and teachers. Our students are encouraged and supported throughout their growth in our program and graduate with a variety of career opportunities from performance to teaching.”  –Cher Carnell, Faculty

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Dance Educator 
  • Arts Management 
  • Dance Teacher 
  • Community Dance Worker 
  • Choreographer

Department of Theatre & Dance

Computer Science

Computer science is an exciting, growing, challenging field that is critical to many aspects of everyday life. As a computer scientist you can make an impact on the advancement of medicine, clean energy, entertainment, communication for the disabled, climate research, and automotive technologies to name a few. For some, the most motivational aspect of being a computer scientist is being involved in creating the next great technology that will help people the world over.

Western’s Computer Science degree provides the problem-solving and analytical background that ensures programmers and systems analysts can produce creative programming solutions. Computer Science at Western is composed of core classes organized around the study of design and analysis techniques used to write software in various application domains along with details about the internal workings of computers and networks. Elective classes in areas such as artificial intelligence, mobile device programming, robotics, graphics, web programming, bioinformatics, computer security, and video game programming allow students to explore areas of individual interest. 

Western’s Computer Science Department is part of the College of Science and Engineering.

“Computer science majors at Western get a first rate education with lots of one-on-one time with the faculty, but they also enjoy facing challenges together. The best thing about computer science, though, is you can get excited about a new idea and pursue it until it’s a real product.” 

– Geoffrey Matthews, Faculty

 

Beyond the Classroom

As part of a hands-on approach, the Computer Science Department encourages students to get involved outside the classroom. 

Recent student internships: 

  • BDS Intern for Boeing 
  • IT Program Manager Intern at Microsoft
  • Software Engineering Intern at US Nexus 
  • Software Development Engineering Intern for the Files Systems Validation team at Isilon
  • ResTek Intern for Western Washington University

Other students get involved with many of the Computer Science clubs

  • Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) 
  • Association for Women in Computing (AWC) 
  • WWU Game Design Club
  • Collegiate Cyber Defense Club

Western Computer Science students participate and compete in local, regional, and national events:

  • Microsoft Imagine Cup 
  • National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (WWU recently won the Northwest Regional Competition and went on to Nationals)
  • ACM Intercollegiate Programming Competition
  • WWU Hackathon
  • Bellingham Startup Challenge

 

“While at Western, I interned as a developer for Vitech Business Group, a supply chain management consulting firm in Bellingham, and as a program manager at Microsoft. The internship at Microsoft turned into a full-time job and now I work as a program manager in the Windows Live team at Microsoft. Being a program manager is great because I get to help plan what the team builds from the ground up and follow my product through each stage of development until it's shipped.” 

– Amanda Font, Student

 

Careers and Graduate Studies

Advances in areas such as the World Wide Web, robotics, video games, multicore computing, artificial intelligence and cyber security are obviously central to the discipline of computer science, and other fields such as genetics, atomic physics, renewable energy, and health care depend upon computers for advancement as well.

Computer scientists are highly sought after and can attain lucrative jobs directly out of college. Graduates often begin their careers doing computer programming, which is a creative process that spans a wide range of areas of expertise and is heavily influenced by the application for which the programs or software is being developed. With the Bachelor of Science degree, students are prepared for graduate study or careers in industry as systems analysts and/or designers. 

Western Computer Science graduates find work at companies such as Boeing, Microsoft, Vitech, and Amazon with job titles such as: Software Development Engineers, Systems & Data Analysts, Technology Technicians, Implementation Consultants, and Sustainability Analysts.

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Computational Scientist
  • Computer Engineer
  • Data Scientist
  • Database Administrator
  • Educator
  • Game Programmer
  • IT Consultant
  • Network Engineer
  • Project Manager
  • Research Analyst
  • Robotics Programmer
  • Software Engineer
  • Systems Administrator
  • Systems Analyst
  • Systems Engineer
  • Technical Writer
  • User Experience Designer
  • Web Developer

Department of Computer Science

Community Health

Housed in the Department of Health and Human Development, Western's Community Health Program is nationally, regionally, and locally recognized, and lives up to its mission:

To provide students with a rigorous and dynamic hands-on educational experience that prepares them to effectively and compassionately improve the public’s health and advocate for social justice through community involvement and collaboration.

The Community Health curriculum teaches students the effect of health promotion and education on individuals and their relationship with their environments. Students learn to approach public health using a social ecological perspective, which considers health outcomes as they relate to factors of individual, social, and environmental influence.

Students take community health-focused coursework and classes from interdisciplinary fields including social sciences (e.g., anthropology, psychology, political science, and sociology), and biological and physical sciences (e.g., anatomy and physiology, exercise physiology, and chemistry). Faculty have experience in a wide array of public health topics including but not limited to nutrition, global health, reproductive health, college health, and environmental health.

Prepared for Success

Students graduate from the program thoroughly versed and practiced as health education specialists, and are prepared to succeed on the Certified Health Education Specialist qualifying exam. In fact, Western’s community health students have a CHES examination pass rate higher than that of the national average. Students’ preparation for success on the exam includes knowledge acquisition of public health theory and practice, and extensive participation in individual and team projects that require community engagement and collaboration.

Western’s Health and Human Development Department is part of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Beyond the Classroom

Internships

When students complete their coursework, they engage in a 10-week, full-time, community based internship. The internship program is highly regarded by community partners across Washington state and beyond. Community health students have completed internships with Swedish Medical Center, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Sea Mar Community Health Clinics, Mt. Baker Planned Parenthood, Whatcom County Health Department, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C., and have served abroad in Guatemala, Uganda, Egypt, Australia, and Nepal.

Research

Students interested in participating in research are invited to join community health faculty research projects. Past students have published peer-reviewed articles, presented at national conferences including, for instance, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) and the American Public Health Association’s annual conferences. Students have also successfully competed in and applied for national public health competitions and scholarships.

Community Service

Over the last decade, community health students have contributed more than 100,000 hours of work within communities. This work allows our students to practice the skills they have learned in the classroom while assisting communities in the process.

 

Careers and Graduate Studies

The community health major is functions as a gateway for students who want to work in any public or global health venue including, but not limited to:

  • Governmental and Non-Profit Agencies
  • Medical Care Settings
  • Worksite Wellness Programs
  • University Health Programs.

The community health major also serves as a preparatory program for graduate or post-baccalaureate training in health promotion/education, public health, and related areas. For instance, some of the program’s alumni go on to earn their Masters in Public Health.

 

The following is a list of employers of and graduate programs attended by recent Western community health graduates:

  • Bastyr University: Masters in Public Health
  • Doctor of Nursing Family Practice Nurse Practitioner, Oregon Health & Science University
  • MPH, University of Sydney, Australia
  • MS, Nursing, University of Rochester
  • Access Living, Inc.: Direct Support Professional
  • Brigid Collins: Prevention Initiative Coordinator
  • Denver Health-Westside Clinic: Patient Navigator
  • Highgate Senior Living: Certified Nursing Assistant and Medication Aide
  • New Beginnings: Women’s and Children’s Advocate Relief Worker
  • Pancreatic Cancer Action Network: Community Engagement Coordinator
  • Seattle Cancer Care Alliance: Program Assistant for Staff Education and Nutrition
  • Seattle Children’s Hospital: Family Service Coordinator
  • United General Hospital: Health Educator
  • Whatcom Council on Aging: Community Outreach Coordinator
  • WithinReach: Family Engagement Specialist

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Community Health Educator 
  • Tobacco Control Specialist 
  • Sexuality Education Coordinator 
  • HIV/AIDS Educator 
  • Hospital-based Wellness Program Director 
  • Public Health Educator 
  • Substance Abuse Educator 
  • College Health Educator 
  • Injury Prevention Specialist 
  • Curriculum Development Specialist 
  • Health Consultant 
  • Health Information Specialist 
  • Nutrition and Physical Activity Coordinator

Department of Health and Human Development - Community Health

Communication Sciences and Disorders

One out of every six Americans has a communication disorder. Each one can be helped in some way by a speech-language pathologist, audiologist, or speech, language, and hearing scientist. Grounded in the latest scientific theories and research, Western's Communication Sciences and Disorder (CSD) students learn to assess and treat persons with communication disorders – from infants to the elderly. Students use state-of-the-art lab equipment and analysis procedures as they study sound, speech, language, and hearing.

CSD includes two disciplines, speech-language pathology and audiology. The academic and clinical curriculum at the undergraduate level includes a wide range of courses and clinical practicum opportunities. Students study normal communication processes including language development, speech, acoustics, hearing science, anatomy and physiology, and disorder studies in language disorders, phonological disorders, and hearing disorders. Students also have the opportunity for observation through the on-campus hearing, speech-language, and aural rehabilitation clinics, which see more than 800 clients from the community.

Communication Sciences and Disorders faculty are active in augmentative and alternative communication research, brain injury research, cochlear implant rehabilitation research, and scholarship of teaching and learning.

Beyond the Classroom

The Communication Sciences and Disorders Department values service learning, offering clinical observations and services through the Western Washington University Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic. Faculty train students in clinical preparation, present nationally and internationally, are involved with a variety of research topics, and lead a global service learning trip to Guatemala. Student internships and other service learning opportunities within the local and broader communities are encouraged. 

Recent Student Internships:

  • Madigan Army Medical Center
  • Edmonds School District

Students also have the opportunity to get involved with Western’s National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) club. 

 

Adolpho Dominguez IV
CSD Student

“The CSD major is incredibly multidisciplinary and yet maintains a direct focus on communication. I’ve been able to study human development, embryology, the physics of sound, anatomy, and physiology of the speech mechanism, and the list goes on. I have been exposed to a well-rounded curriculum from passionate professors.”

Careers and Graduate Studies

With the changing makeup of our population comes the need for speech-language-hearing professionals who are skilled in working in a complex and diverse society. For people with the proper education and flexibility, employment prospects are excellent, and the ability to contribute positively to people’s lives is limitless. 

The undergraduate education prepares students to pursue a graduate degree. A master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology or a clinical doctorate degree in Audiology and certification at the national level are required to engage in professional practice. 

Western graduates who pursue graduate studies are doing so at such schools as: 

  • Duke University: Nursing 
  • Washington State University: Speech and Hearing Sciences (MA) 
  • Western Washington University: Speech-Language Pathology (MA)
  • Western Washington University: Doctorate in Audiology (AuD)

Employers of Recent Western Graduates: 

  • Advanced Audiology: Office Manager/Audiology Assistant
  • Eastmont School District: Speech Pathologist
  • Family Care Network: Electronic Medical Records (EMR) Support
  • Providence Health Services: Registered Behavior Technician
  • Yakima Valley Hearing and Speech Center: Speech-Language Pathology Assistant

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Speech-Language Pathologist 
  • Speech-Language Scientist 
  • Government/Industry Consultant 
  • Audiologist 
  • Hearing Scientist 
  • Clinic Administrator

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders

Chemistry/Physics—Secondary

Western's programs in Secondary Education are designed to prepare thoughtful, knowledgeable, and effective middle and secondary school teachers for a diverse society. Learning to teach Chemistry and Physics occurs through a variety of means: the study of a wide variety of chemistry and physics, an extended internship, and continual experiences as a student, learner, and problem solver.

Western’s Secondary Education program in Chemistry/Physics provides many benefits to students, such as close student-faculty contact and relatively small classes. Students in this program have direct access to modern laboratory equipment and instrumentation, as well as opportunities for research work under the direction of a faculty advisor. 

This program is designed for those who wish to earn Washington residency certification to teach middle and/or high school and must be accompanied by the professional preparation program in secondary education offered through Woodring College of Education

Western’s Chemistry and Physics & Astronomy departments are part of the College of Science and Engineering.

Beyond the Classroom

Opportunities beyond classroom study are a cornerstone of the Chemistry Department. Undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to pursue faculty mentored research projects and to present the results of their research at a national conference or during Western’s annual Scholars Week. Undergraduate and graduate students often coauthor papers published in scientific literature.  

The Physics Department also offers ways for students to pursue their area of interest outside of the class room. Active research programs in astronomy, theoretical and experimental condensed matter physics, and physics education research actively recruit students. These research opportunities allow students to participate in cutting edge research. Students are also encouraged to approach faculty individually and inquire about research opportunities. 

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Secondary Education Teacher

Chemistry/Mathematics—Secondary

There is a demand for qualified teachers at the secondary level, and there is an even greater need for quality mathematics and chemistry teachers – teachers who care about students, have a broad and deep understanding of mathematics and chemistry and who are thoroughly professional. The responsibilities are great, but the rewards are even greater.

Western’s Secondary Education program in Chemistry/Mathematics provides many benefits to students, such as close student-faculty contact and relatively small classes. Students in this program have direct access to modern laboratory equipment and instrumentation, as well as opportunities for research work under the direction of a faculty advisor. 

This program is designed for those who wish to earn Washington residency certification to teach middle and/or high school and must be accompanied by the professional preparation program in secondary education offered through Woodring College of Education. Courses required for a state teaching endorsement must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better. 

Western’s Chemistry and Mathematics departments are part of the College of Science and Engineering.

 

Beyond the Classroom

As a prospective teacher, Western encourages students to focus on expanding their personal understanding of Mathematics and Chemistry and to capitalize on opportunities to work with pre-college students as a tutor, classroom assistant, practicum student, and as a novice teacher in their internship. 

Chemistry students are encouraged to pursue faculty mentored research projects and to present the results of their research at a national conference or during Western’s annual Scholars Week. Undergraduate and graduate students often coauthor papers published in scientific literature.  

Mathematics students stay involved with mathematics outside of the classroom by working in the  Math Center – staffed by undergraduate math fellows, it is a great place to get help with homework, meet other students, and form study groups – joining the Putnam Exam group, or participating in the Math Modeling Competition or the Kryptos Cryptography Competition. You might also work on a research or independent study project with faculty.

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Secondary Education Teacher

Chemistry/Biology—Secondary

Western's Chemistry and Biology programs provide close student-faculty contact and relatively small classes, direct access to modern laboratory equipment and instrumentation, and opportunities for cutting-edge research under the direction of a faculty advisor. Within the Chemistry Department, faculty are active in many research areas including biofuels, protein engineering, computer modeling, catalysis, nanomaterials, materials for solar cells, electrochemistry, polymers, thin films, protein structural analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray crystallography, and organic synthesis.

The Department of Chemistry, in addition to its core of fundamental studies in Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic and Physical chemistry, has added a variety of elective courses that offer diversity in training, study and research at the undergraduate level. 

This program is designed for those who wish to earn Washington residency certification to teach middle and/or high school and must be accompanied by the professional preparation program in secondary education offered through Woodring College of Education. Courses required for a state teaching endorsement must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

Beyond the Classroom

Opportunities beyond classroom study are a cornerstone of the Chemistry Department. Undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to pursue faculty mentored research projects and to present the results of their research at a national conference or during Western’s annual Scholars Week. Undergraduate and graduate students often coauthor papers that are published in scientific literature. 

The department strives to offer a diverse and vibrant seminar program. Each year leading researchers, as well as faculty and graduate students from Western, present and discuss their cutting-edge research. 

Western Chemistry students might also be involved in the Chemistry Club (WEsTeRn Chem Club) – a Student Chapter of the American Chemical Society. The chapter provides students at Western with an opportunity to gain information on educational and professional opportunities and activates. Most importantly, the chapter gets students involved with fun social and service activities that help strengthen bonds among students and faculty.

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • High School Chemistry/Biology Teacher

College of Science and Engineering (was Sciences and Technology)

Chemistry

Western's Chemistry programs provide close student-faculty contact and relatively small classes, direct access to modern laboratory equipment and instrumentation, and opportunities for cutting-edge research under the direction of a faculty advisor. 

Within the department, faculty are active in many research areas including biofuels, protein engineering, computer modeling, catalysis, nanomaterials, materials for solar cells, electrochemistry, polymers, thin films, protein structural analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray crystallography, and organic synthesis.

Western’s Chemistry Department is part of the College of Science and Engineering.

 

Catherine Miles
Chemistry Student

“My professors are as excited about chemistry as I am. They teach with such vigor that you can’t help getting excited. I believe I’m getting one of the best undergraduate educations possible.”

The Department of Chemistry, in addition to its core of fundamental studies in Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic and Physical chemistry, has added a variety of elective courses that offer diversity in training, study and research at the undergraduate level. Students are immersed in an environment emphasizing strong interdisciplinary scientific preparation, and receive hands-on experience with advanced chemical and biochemical methods.  

The Chemistry Department at Western Washington University is approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS), and students who complete the Bachelor of Science in the Chemistry program receive ACS certification of their degree.

 

Beyond the Classroom

Opportunities beyond classroom study are a cornerstone of the Chemistry Department. Undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to pursue faculty mentored research projects and to present the results of their research at a national conference or during Western’s annual Scholars Week. Undergraduate and graduate students often coauthor papers that are published in scientific literature. 

The department strives to offer a diverse and vibrant seminar program. Each year leading researchers, as well as faculty and graduate students from Western, present and discuss their cutting-edge research. 

Western Chemistry students might also be involved in the Chemistry Club (WEsTeRn Chem Club) – a Student Chapter of the American Chemical Society. The chapter provides students at Western with an opportunity to gain information on educational and professional opportunities and activates. Most importantly, the chapter gets students involved with fun social and service activities that help strengthen bonds among students and faculty.

Careers and Graduate Studies

Graduates have gone on to careers in medicine, aerospace, microelectronics, biotechnology, community college teaching, the energy sector, and many other fields.

Employers of recent Western graduates: 

  • Ecig Express: Lab Technician 
  • Pacific National Laboratories: Research Assistant 
  • Phillips 66: Lab Technician 
  • TOKU-E: Laboratory Technician 

Western graduates who pursue graduate studies are doing so at such schools as: 

  • University of California: Chemistry (PhD)
  • University of Chicago: Chemistry (PhD)
  • University of Illinois: Physical Chemistry (PhD)
  • University of Massachusetts: Chemistry (PhD)
  • University of Oregon: Chemistry (MS)
  • Western Washington University: Chemistry (MS) 

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Chemical/Pharmaceutical Sales 
  • Crime Lab Analyst 
  • High School Teacher 
  • Industrial Chemist 
  • Veterinarian 
  • Technical Writing 
  • Forensic Scientist 
  • Quality Assurance Specialist 
  • Research Scientist 
  • Physician 
  • Occupational Safety Specialist

 

Chemistry

Western's Chemistry programs provide close student-faculty contact and relatively small classes, direct access to modern laboratory equipment and instrumentation, and opportunities for cutting-edge research under the direction of a faculty advisor. Within the department, faculty are active in many research areas including biofuels, protein engineering, computer modeling, catalysis, nanomaterials, materials for solar cells, electrochemistry, polymers, thin films, protein structural analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray crystallography, and organic synthesis.

The Department of Chemistry, in addition to its core of fundamental studies in Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic and Physical chemistry, has added a variety of elective courses that offer diversity in training, study and research at the undergraduate level. 

Catherine Miles
Chemistry Student

“My professors are as excited about chemistry as I am. They teach with such vigor that you can’t help getting excited. I believe I’m getting one of the best undergraduate educations possible.”

Beyond the Classroom

Opportunities beyond classroom study are a cornerstone of the Chemistry Department. Undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to pursue faculty mentored research projects and to present the results of their research at a national conference or during Western’s annual Scholars Week. Undergraduate and graduate students often coauthor papers that are published in scientific literature. 

The department strives to offer a diverse and vibrant seminar program. Each year leading researchers, as well as faculty and graduate students from Western, present and discuss their cutting-edge research. 

Western Chemistry students might also be involved in the Chemistry Club (WEsTeRn Chem Club) – a Student Chapter of the American Chemical Society. The chapter provides students at Western with an opportunity to gain information on educational and professional opportunities and activates. Most importantly, the chapter gets students involved with fun social and service activities that help strengthen bonds among students and faculty. 

 

Careers and Graduate Studies

After graduation, our alumni have continued their education in chemistry graduate schools, medical schools, or other professional fields, and have successful careers in education, aerospace, microelectronics, biotechnology, and the energy and business sectors. The success of these graduates attests to the quality of our programs.

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Chemical/Pharmaceutical Sales
  • Crime Lab Analyst
  • High School Teacher
  • Industrial Chemist
  • Physician
  • Technical Writing
  • Forensic Scientist
  • Quality Assurance Specialist
  • Research Scientist
  • Occupational Safety Specialist
  • Science Laboratory Technician
  • Environmental Scientist/Consultant
  • Biotechnology Scientist
  • College Professor

 

Canadian-American Studies

Canada and the United States share a continent and are linked by deep economic ties, several common historical experiences, and many cultural similarities; they are also marked by real and important differences.

The Canadian-American Studies major helps students to understand and navigate these similarities and differences, preparing them to engage key cultural, environmental, and economic issues in North America today and in the future through three specializations:

  • Canadian-American Relations
  • Canadian Histories/Cultures/Identities
  • Francophone Canada

Additionally, students may design their own specialization in consultation with a faculty advisor.

Why Consider a Canadian-American Studies Major?

On its own, the major provides an excellent international and interdisciplinary course of study for students looking for a broad-based, liberal arts education. By drawing upon courses from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, the major explores key concepts and methods across multiple disciplines and applies them to complex problems in our shared regional and continental contexts.

Through identified specializations, the major is also designed to combine with other majors to add depth and international expertise. Examples include combining Canadian-American Studies’ specializations with: anthropology, economics, environmental policy and science, geography, history, international business, languages, or political science.

“For a Canadian-American Studies major, being 20 minutes from Canada has its advantages. The program is also customizable, which allowed me to take a variety of courses ranging from environmental studies to political science.” -Julia Barnes, student

Beyond the Classroom

Beyond the classroom, the Center and Club Canada offer opportunities for students to immerse themselves in Canadian culture by holding events such as hockey and broom ball games, regional food celebrations, film screenings, guest speakers and faculty talks, and field excursions to Vancouver, Whistler, and more.

The Center provides support and resources to students interested in participating in relevant internships, including opportunities with the Canadian Consulate in Seattle.

Careers and Graduate Studies

The Canadian-American Studies curriculum prepares students for careers related to art and literature, education and research, environmental policy, diplomacy, international business, international law, and politics. 

Recent Western graduates have found fulfilling careers working for the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, directing internet marketing for a Canada-US import/export firm, serving as a US federal government liaison to a municipality for emergency preparedness, working for Google in their map division, and coordinating border and emergency management programs for the cross-border Pacific Northwest Economic Region.

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Art and Literature
  • Education and Research
  • Environmental Policy
  • Diplomacy
  • International Business
  • International Law
  • Politics

Department of Canadian-American Studies

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