Assessment Plan

Department: Philosophy
Assessment Coordinator: Ryan Wasserman

Mission Statement

In support of the missions of Western Washington University and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the mission of the Philosophy Department is to provide outstanding undergraduate education in philosophy, to benefit professional and nonprofessional communities through our scholarship and service, and to foster life-long learning in our students by contributing to Western’s excellent liberal arts education. The department offers a variety of courses in traditional areas of philosophical study, including ethics, epistemology, logic, metaphysics, and the history of philosophy. Through a collaborative study of these topics, our faculty helps students develop the skills that we value as a department - skills like critical thinking, critical reading, analytic writing, and effective speaking.

Student Learning Objectives

Departmental SLOs:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in the core areas of ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, and the history of philosophy
  2. Demonstrate mastery of symbolic logic
  3. Think critically
  4. Read critically
  5. Write analytically
  6. Speak effectively

GUR SLOs:

  1. Identify and analyze complex problems
  1. Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities

Assessment Measures

Assessment Measures

SLO’s Assessed

Use of the Information

Exams, papers, and other assignments in our 400-level epistemology, ethics, and metaphysics courses (410, 420, 430), as well as those in the history of philosophy sequence (364, 366, 367)

1, 3, 4, 5

Summaries of student performance, relative to the SLOs, are reported annually to the chair by faculty teaching the final courses in the ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics sequences, and also by the faculty teaching the history of philosophy sequence. The chair summarizes these reports for the department and presents his or her findings in the annual assessment meeting. The meeting concludes in the creation of a departmental improvement plan.

Exams in our logic sequence (102, 202)

2

Summaries of student performance, relative to the SLOs, are reported annually to the chair by faculty teaching the final course the logic sequence. The chair summarizes these reports for the department and presents his or her findings in the annual assessment meeting.

Seminar papers

1, 3, 4, 5

Seminar papers are collected and stored by the chair as part of an electronic portfolio for each student. The chair summarizes the content of these portfolios for the department and presents his or her findings in the annual assessment meeting.

Seminar faculty assessment

3, 4, 5, 6

Faculty assessments of seminar students are collected and stored by the chair as part of an electronic portfolio for each student. The chair summarizes the content of these portfolios for the department and presents his or her findings in the annual assessment meeting.

Seminar self assessment

3, 4, 5, 6

Self assessments from seminar student are collected and stored by the chair as part of an electronic portfolio for each student. The chair summarizes the content of these portfolios for the department and presents his or her findings in the annual assessment meeting.

Exams, papers, and other assignments in our 100-level epistemology, ethics, and metaphysics courses (113 and 114).

GUR 4

Summaries of strengths and weaknesses of student performance, relative to the GUR SLO, are reported annually to the chair. This data is summarized, shared, and acted upon, as described above; a written summary is sent to the CUE committee for action.

Exams, papers, and other assignments in our GUR ethics courses (112, 115, 350, 360).

GUR 8

Summaries of strengths and weaknesses of student performance, relative to the GUR SLO, are reported annually to the chair. This data is summarized, shared, and acted upon, as described above; a written summary is sent to the CUE committee for action.

 

 

 

Page Updated 02.07.2014