Mission

Assessment Plan

As part of the overall mission of Western Washington University and the College of Sciences and Technology, the mission of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is to:

  • Provide a curriculum in Physics and Astronomy with the breadth and depth to facilitate and support effective learning in the core areas of the discipline at all levels;
  • Provide a range of courses in Physics and Astronomy that enhance the education of students of the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences;
  • Provide the core curriculum in Physics for future Physics teachers and for science teachers in all disciplines;
  • Provide courses at a variety of levels that serve the needs of other major programs within the College of Sciences and Technology;
  • Provide students with opportunities to participate in original research, and encourage and support faculty research and the improvement of pedagogical methods;
  • Provide an overall supportive and sustainable working and learning environment for students, faculty, and staff.

Learning Objectives

Within three to five years of graduation, graduates of the program will:

  1. Utilize conceptual knowledge and problem-solving skills in a variety of situations.
  2. Apply core Physics principles to problems in professional or academic settings.
  3. Effectively communicate ideas and strategies to colleagues.
  4. Actively demonstrate the ability to work individually and in groups.
  5. Continue to add to personal core knowledge and professional skill sets as life-long learners.

Learning Outcomes

Upon graduation from the department of Physics and Astronomy, students will:

  1. Have demonstrated mastery of the core concepts of Physics.
  2. Have demonstrated understanding of quantitative reasoning and scientific inquiry.
  3. Have demonstrated an ability to use lab equipment and interpret data.
  4. Have demonstrated an ability to communicate ideas effectively, both verbally and in written form.
  5. Have demonstrated an ability to solve problems, both independently and in groups.
Page Updated 03.27.2013