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Sustainability Courses

Western offers both sustainability-focused and sustinability-related courses. These courses are offered in many different colleges and departments, including Huxley College of Environmental Studies, Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, Woodring College of Education, Environmental Studies, Accounting, Economics, Geology, Marketing, Political Science, Materials Science, and many others. Courses are listed per instructor assessment of sustainability content within each course.

Do you know of another course to add to the list? Email the course name to sustain@wwu.edu.

= Courses Available Fall Quarter 2013
= Courses Available Winter Quarter 2014
= Courses Available Spring Quarter 2014

Accounting Courses

ACCT 484 - Environmental Accounting / Sustainability Reporting (4)
Prereq: Majors Only. ACCT 331, ACCT 343, ACCT 375 or concurrent.
An in-depth analysis of accounting for the natural environment. Readings, discussion and case analyses cover current issues, such as financial reporting and disclosure, management decision making and evaluation techniques, taxation and the profession's role in environmental issues.

Biology Courses

BIOL 140 - The Ecology and Economics of Salmon Recovery (4)
Focus on the 4 causes of salmon decline (Habitat, Hydropower, Harvest, and Hatcheries) to investigate the interactions between ecology and economics through lectures, reading and independent projects. Also offered as ECON 140.

BIOL 204 - Introduction to Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity (4)
Prereq: CHEM 121 or CHEM 125 or concurrent.
Introduction to evolutionary and ecological processes involved in the generation of our planet's biodiversity, including review of patterns and processes that influence the origin, evolution, distribution, and abundance of living things. Includes lab.

BIOL 325 – Ecology (3)
Prereq: BIOL 204, BIOL 205, BIOL 206
Organismal-environmental relationships in marine, fresh water and terrestrial habitats. Functions and development of ecosystems.

BIOL 326 - Ecology Laboratory (3)
Prereq: BIOL 325 or concurrent; or ESCI 325.
Introduction to ecological research, culminating in student-designed research projects. Written and oral presentation of projects.

BIOL 416 - Ecosystem Ecology and Global Change (4)
Prereq: BIOL 325 or ESCI 325; BIOL 326 recommended.
Investigation of the factors controlling whole ecosystem processes such as productivity, decomposition, and nutrient cycling. Application of these concepts to current issues in global change, including the carbon cycle and global warming, land use change, nitrogen-loading, and biodiversity and ecosystem function. Lectures and textbook reading are integrated with discussion of papers from the primary literature.

BIOL 464 – Biology of Marine Mammals (4)
Prereq: BIOL 204, BIOL 205, BIOL 206. Recommended: ESCI 321.
Examination of the evolution, physiology, ecology and conservation of marine mammals through critical thinking and discussion of the primary literature. Offered in alternate years. Writing-proficiency course.

BIOL 516 - Advanced Ecosystem Ecology and Global Change (4)
Prereq: BIOL 325 or ESCI 325 or equivalent; BIOL 326 recommended.
Investigates the factors controlling whole ecosystem processes. Application of these concepts to current issues in global change, including the carbon cycle and global warming, land-use change, nitrogen load, and biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.

BIOL 599 - Seminar in Biology (2)
Prereq: 40 credits in biology.
Selected problems in biology, with emphasis on current literature. Repeatable.

Communication Courses

COMM 244 - Advocacy Through Media (4)
Introduction to nonprofit information campaigns, social issues marketing and other forms of advocacy through contemporary mass media. Students will learn basic theory and then engage in applied exercises as well as service learning assignments.

COMM 440 - Critical Media Literacy (5)
Prereq: COMM 240 or JOUR 190; COMM 398.
Examination of advanced theories in mass communication and media literacy. Examines social, political, and economic forces that shape media; influences of media on society; and issues of media policy, media advocacy, and media reform.

COMM 498 - Communication Ethics (5)
Prereq: COMM 398 or permission of instructor.
This capstone course examines diverse ethical theories and perspectives pertaining to communication in contexts ranging from the local to the global. Students will have opportunities to reflect on and clarify their own ethical commitments, and to understand these in relation to ethical theories and perspectives in the field of communication studies.

Economic Courses

ECON 101 - Markets and Society (4)
An introduction to the U.S. economy and its role in the world economy. Analysis of current economic controversies at home and abroad. Issues may include overall economic performance, problems of hunger and poverty, and the issues of economic insecurity, inequality, and sustainability. The course will examine the emergence of globalization and regionalism, and their implications for the workers and the environment.

ECON 343 - Population, Environment, and World Agriculture (4)
Prereq: ECON 206 or HNRS 254 or HNRS 202.
Utilizes economic principles to understand the interactions among population growth, food demand, agricultural development, and natural resource utilization, degradation, and conservation.

ECON 383 - Environmental Economics (4)
Prereq: ECON 206 or HNRS 254 or HNRS 202.
Explores the economic basis of environmental issues and policies. An examination of property rights, externalities and the common-property basis of environmental problems. Alternative policies are analyzed, involving such issues as air and water pollution, solid-waste disposal, hazardous substances, wilderness preservation and the protection of endangered species.

ECON 384 - Energy Economics (4)
Prereq: ECON 206 or HNRS 254 or HNRS 202.
The role of energy in the economy and key aspects of energy supply and demand. Topics include the interrelationships among energy use, economic growth, and the environment; conservation; solar and 'unconventional' energy sources; world oil markets; regulation of gas and electric utilities; and U.S. energy policy.

ECON 482 - Advanced Topics in Environmental Economics (4)
Prereq: ECON 383 or equivalent
Examines an extended set of applications in environmental economics, with a focus on deepening the student's understanding of the field. Applications involve current controversies in environmental policy and management, as well as methodological issues. Topics include climate change, solid waste management and recycling, water quality, and other issues of current interest.

ECON 483 - Resource Economics (4)
Prereq: ECON 306 or ECON 309
Principles of efficient resource allocation over time, distributional equity and cost/benefit analysis. Examines minerals and other exhaustible resources; forests, fisheries and other renewable resources; and public goods such as water and wilderness.

ECON 493 - Senior Seminar: Economics, the Environment & Natural Resources (4)
Prereq: Senior standing; economics/environmental studies combined major; also offered as ESTU 493
Discussion and analysis of selected issues in the economics of the environment and natural resources.

Geography Courses

EGEO 501 - History and Philosophy of Geography (3)
Study of geography as a core discipline; its origins and trends in the understanding of multifaceted environmental problems.

Environmental Science Courses

ESCI 330 - Natural History of the Pacific Northwest (4)
Prereq: ESCI 310 or one year of biology or instructor permission
A field-oriented introduction to the geology, climate and ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest, with a focus on the biology and the ecology of important organisms.

ESCI 439 - Conservation of Biological Diversity (4)
Prereq: ESCI 325 or BIOL 325
Examination of causes and consequences of declines in biodiversity due to human activities. Review of conflicts arising from multiple-use management of natural resources. Survey and evaluation of conservation efforts directed at single species and at ecosystems. Optional field trips.

ESCI 539 - Advanced Conservation of Biological Diversity (5)
Prereq: ESCI 325 or BIOL 325
Advanced study of causes and consequences of declines in biodiversity due to human activities. Review of conflicts arising from multiple-use management of natural resources. Survey and evaluation of conservation efforts directed at single species and at ecosystems. Discussion of primary conservation literature. Optional field trips.

Environmental Study Courses

ENVS 116 - Sustainability Literacy I (3)
This course is an introductory course in sustainability literacy. This course reviews emerging issues in global sustainability studies and introduces students to writing and problem solving skills. Emphases are in multidisciplinary approaches that address complex social, environmental, and economic interrelationships in sustainable development.

ENVS 195 - Local Perspectives on Environment and Sustainability (Viking Launch) (2)
Explore climate science through research and field observations, with a soecial focus on the Nooksack River watershed and examine the environmental impacts of our energy, waste, food and transportation choices. Discover how local schools, governments, non-profit organizations, businesses and individuals are working together to help solve the problems associated with climate change and take action by participating in a service learning project. Acquire carbon footprint analysis training and work with staff at the Washington Department of Ecology Bellingham field office to implement their 'Carbon Smart at Work' program. Document your experience with photographs, field audio and writing to create a culminating presentation. S/U grading.

ENVS 202 - Introduction to Environmental Studies and Sustainability (3)
A basic overview of environmental issues in the United States and globally. An emphasis will be placed on environmental and human sustainability in a social science context.

ENVS 204 - Human Geography (4)
This course explores regional patterns of population and settlement across the globe and introduces students to concepts and techniques in the spatial analysis of economic, cultural, and political organizations.

ENVS 303 - Human Ecology and Sustainability (4)
Prereq: ENVS 202 or ESTU 202 or Huxley major prerequisites or instructor permission.
The course provides an in-depth look at human and environmental systems interacation. As such, students need familiarity with environmental concepts, either through ENVS 202 or through the Huxley major prerequisites. Some students with self-designed majors or Huxley minors may also be well prepared and can enter through instructor permission.

ENVS 304 - Environment and Resource Policy (4)
Prereq: ENVS 202 or ESTU 202 or Huxley major or instructor permission.
An examination of environmental and resource policy in the United States. What is policy, how is it made and how does it change? The history of environmental policy is examined, and current environmental policy surveyed. Federal, state, regional and local jurisdictions and how they interact in the policy arena are examined. Primary forces affecting environmental policy are reviewed and analyzed. Several case studies are presented.

ENVS 305 - Environmental History and Ethics (4)
Prereq: BIOL 101 or BIOL 204; PLSC 250; ECON 206; MATH 114 or equivalent or higher; CHEM 121; or instructor permission.
Nature and nation are inextricably connected in American history, but American identification with nature has often led in surprising directions. This course reviews how various human activities have historically depended on and interacted with the natural world. It traces how these interactions have changed places, people, animals and institutions over the last five hundred years in what is now the United States. The focus will be on how culture, science, and politics have mixed in American environmental history. WP2.

ENVS 331 - Canada: Society and Environment (3)
Prereq: ENVS 204 or EGEO 201 or HIST 277 or C/AM 200 or instructor permission.
This course explores relationships between people and the environment in the territory that has come to be known as Canada; emphasis is placed upon the history of such relationships. Topics include: physical geography, Aboriginal geographies, Native-Newcomer interactions, evolving and contested political boundaries, resource use and ecological crisis, and urban development.

ENVS 332 - The Pacific Northwest: Society and Environment (3)
Prereq: ENVS 203 or EGEO 203 or ENVS 204 or EGEO 201 or instructor permission.
Examination of distribution and character of economic activity, population plus settlement and role of climate, landforms and resources in distributions. Offered alternate years.

ENVS 333 - ENVS 333 - East Asia: Society and Environment (3)
Prereq: ENVS 204 or EGEO 201 or EAST 201 or EAST 202 or instructor permission.
Survey of physical environment, sustainability, peoples, regions and resources of East Asia; problems and prospects.

ENVS 340 - Developing World (4)
Prereq: ENVS 204 or EGEO 201
Analysis of selected geographical problems of major countries and regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America; population pressure, agricultural productivity; resource appraisal and utilization; urban industrial growth; urban and regional planning.

ENVS 343 - Urbanization: Processes and Patterns (4)
Prereq: ENVS 204 or EGEO 201
Geographic focus upon the development, functions and problems of the modern city with emphasis on American patters.

ENVS 350 - Energy Policy and Politics (4)
Prereq: Huxley or CBE or CST major or instructor permission.
This course will allow students to understand the history of energy policy within the U.S.; gain an understanding of the major actors in energy policy; and explore the implications for energy policy from local to global levels. A specific focus will be placed on energy issues as they pertain to the Pacific Northwest.

ENVS 359 - Greening Business Policy and Practice (4)
Prereq: Completion of Huxley ENVS Major Phase I or ESCI Major or CBE Major or permission of instructor.
This course will provide both a survey and applications of major U.S. and Washington state policies and practices supporting the greening of business. Also offered as MGMT 359.

ENVS 360 - Plan Graphics: Methods in Urban Planning Design Graphics (2)
Prereq: Declaration of Major in Urban Planning and Sustainable Development.
Introduction to the application of graphic design technology to plan design using computer aided design, publication layout, image presentation, and video editing software.

ENVS 361 - Introduction to Planning (3)
Prereq: Admission to Huxley College or instructor permission.
Principles and practices in urban development and public planning in the United States. Concepts of planning as a community process and professional activity. Evolution of planning ideas in response to changing social, economic, and environmental conditions within the American political framework. Survey of the specialized fields in planning practice, emphasizing the emerging field of environmental planning.

ENVS 373 - Transportation Systems and Planning (3)
Prereq: ENVS 361 or ESTU 369; or instructor permission.
Locational and network analysis and modeling of local, regional and national systems. Also, investigation of alternatives to traditional transportation modes.

ENVS 381 - Introduction to Education for Environment and Sustainability (4)
Prereq: Admission to Huxley College or instructor permission.
An introduction to environmental safety and a review of current thinking and practices including connections to sustainability. Focus on history, evolution, and need for environmental education, and on its goals and principles, content, settings, methods and processes approached through reading, discussion and project work.

ENVS 382 - Curriculum for Environment and Sustainability (4)
Prereq: ENVS 381 or ESTU 371
Critical review of existing curricula, learning theory and learning objectives are examined and strategies for attaining these objectives studied and practiced. The qualities of the ideal environmental education curriculum are identified. Students practice curriculum writing and teaching. Students observe in real world classroom and outdoor teaching settings.

ENVS 410 - Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture (4)
Prereq: Senior status.
Ecological concepts and principles applied to design and management of sustainable food production systems. Consideration given to food and farm politics and economics, as well as the ecperience of place and policies for relocalization. Includes case studies and laboratory/field experience in sustainable agriculutre horticulture and strategies for resillience. Offered alternate years.

ENVS 412 - Environmental Journalism (4)
Prereq: JOUR 207; ESCI 101 or ENVS 202 or ESTU 202
Goal is to equip students to report and write clearly, critically and constructively on environmental and natural resource issues. Emphasis on writing articles for publication involves reading, discussion, and much research and writing.

ENVS 430 - Borderlands (4)
Prereq: ENVS 330 or EGEO 320 or ENVS 331 or EGEO 328 or ENVS 332 or EGEO 327 or C/AM 200 or instructor permission.
Investigation of the geography and issues associated with the growing importance of the United States' border regions, especially our northern border with Canada; selected trans-border environmental, sustainability, economic, and urban topics.

ENVS 431 - Pacific Rim (4)
Prereq: Any one of: ENVS 330 or EGEO 320; ENVS 331 or EGEO 328; ENVS 332 or EGEO 327; ENVS 333 or EGEO 324; EAST 302; or instructor permission.
Investigation of the geography and issues associated with the growing importance of Pacific Rim nations; selected environmental, sustainability, economic, urban and cultural topics.

ENVS 443 - The Urban Environment (4)
Prereq: ENVS 204 or EGEO 201; ENVS 343 or EGEO 314.
Comparative patterns and processes of urban-economic change in the industrial and non-industrial world. Emphasis on urban environmental development issues and conflicts.

ENVS 444 - Colonial Landscapes in the Pacific Northwest (4)
Prereq: One (1) of the following: EGEO 320, EGEO 328, EGEO 327, ENVS 308, ENVS 330, ENVS 331, ENVS 332, ESTU 341, HIST 391 or instructor permission.
This course provides description and analysis of the impact of European imperialism on the development of Pacific Northwest landscapes; the focus is on Native, British, American, and Canadian actions and territorial claims.

ENVS 450 - United States Environmental Policy (4)
Prereq: Any one of: ENVS 201 or ESTU 201; ENVS 202 or ESTU 202; ENVS 203 or EGEO 203; PLSC 250; ENVS 304 or ESTU 304; ENVS 305 or ESTU 305; or instructor permission.
Analysis and assessment of environmental policy politics, primarily in the United States. Students will examine the actors, institutions, and processes involved in environmental policymaking and develop a solid foundation for understanding how we address our most pressing environmental concerns. The course covers: (1) the major environmental policies and institutions; (2) multiple perspectives that describe and explain the intersections of environmental science and politics; and (3) specific environmental challenges.

ENVS 451 - Natural Resource Policy (3)
Prereq: ENVS 304 or ESTU 304 or ENVs 450 or ESTU 464 or instructor permission.
Explores issues, politics, and conflicts in the area of natural resource policy, including endangered species, water rights and allocation, forest policy, public lands, and/or wetlands. Offered alternate years.

ENVS 452 - International Environmental Policy (4)
Prereq: ENVS 304 or ESTU 304 or permission of instructor.
Examines international environmental issues and national and international ways to address these issues, problems affecting the environmental 'commons' (such as oceans and the atmosphere), and issues relating to sustainable development, including aid and trade.

ENVS 457 - Environmental Dispute Resolution (4)
Prereq: ENVS 304 or ESTU 304 or ENVS 455 or ESTU 468; or instructor permission.
Course considers several fact patterns involving disputes over natural resources and environmental issues. Students will study and, in some cases, research the facts and will be assigned roles to represent during dispute resolution sessions. Students have the opportunity to practice a range of dispute resolution techniques which may include negotiation, mediation, and other dispute resolution techniques.

ENVS 461 - Land Use Law (4)
Prereq: ENVS 304 or ESTU 304; permission of instructor.
Land use planning is an attempt to reconcile the conflict between individual property rights and collective environmental goals. This course examines the American legal system’s role in framing and resolving this dilemma. It provides an understanding of the legal framework that creates our unique ‘bottom up’ land use regulatory system. It also examines the practical and philosophical implications of federal constitutional restrictions on local government land use authority, including ‘takings’ and housing discrimination cases.

ENVS 463 - Native American Planning and Natural Resources Policy (3)
Prereq: ENVS 304 or ESTU 304 or ENVS 361 or ESTU 369 or instructor permission.
Survey of political and jurisdictional considerations, treaty rights, and social and environmental conditions facing tribal communities in their pursuit of self-governance and sustainability. Historic federal Indian policy, court rulings and the consideration of off-reservation treaty rights in regional planning. Approaches to intergovernmental cooperation for sustainable natural resources management. Offered alternate years.

ENVS 466 - Greening Business Applications (5)
Prereq: Huxley major or CBE major or instructor permission; priority for majors in Business and Sustainability. Senior status.
This course is an experiential capstone combining faculty and student teams from the College of Business and Economics and Huxley College of the Environment. Student groups prepare a Green Business Assessment for a community or campus organization and compile, distribute, and present a final report to the campus and the client organizations. Course also offered as MGMT 466.

ENVS 471 - Campus Sustainability Planning Studio (3)
Prereq: ENVS 304 or ESTU 304 or ENVS 361 or ESTU 369, or equivalent or instructor permission.
Introduction to campus sustainability planning as applied to the WWU campus community. Project-based learning and research involving stakeholders across campus. Selected research topics relative to Western's master planning process pursuit of sustainability. A studio course emphasizing the application of sustainability principles in campus planning, development and operations. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits.

ENVS 472 - Planning Studio (6)
Prereq: ENVS 470 or ESTU 370
Analysis and synthesis of significant socioeconomic biophysical and cultural resources used in planning; preparation of a land-use or other plan for a selected region.

ENVS 474 - Planning for Sustainable Communities (4)
Prereq: ENVS 361 or ESTU 369; Admission to Sustainable Design minor or Huxley College; and instructor permission.
Synthesis and application of principles, practices and policies in sustainable development and the design of projects, processes, and products using a systems approach to promote social, economic and environmental sustainability. Students apply sustainable design techniques to local regional and international community problems.

ENVS 476 - Disaster Reduction and Emergency Planning Studio (4)
Prereq: ENVS 362 or ESTU 330, ENVS 372 or EGEO 363, and ENVS 465 or ESTU 430 or permission of instructor.
The course provides students with an opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills in disaster reduction and emergency planning, with an emphasis on community-based approaches. Students will work in groups with a client (or clients) on a quarter-long project of practical significance. Students will be exposed to best practices through case studies across disaster reduction and emergency planning. Project management, client interactions, report writing, and communicating technical information to diverse audiences will be emphasized.

ENVS 482 - Community-Based Education for Sustainability (5)
Prereq: Environmental Studies or Environmental Science major with completion of Environmental Studies core courses (ESCI 302; ESCI 310; ENVS 201; ENVS 202; ENVS 203; ENVS 303 or ENVS 304; ENVS 305; ENVS 343 or ENVS 361; ESTU 430 or ENVS 472 or ENVS 474 or ENVS 493 or ENVS 496; ENVS 498A or ENVS 498B or ENVS 498C or ENVS 498D) taken within 3 quarters of graduation.
Theory, research and practice of working in an inclusive community context to define, study, and facilitate social-environmental change. Study of participatory techniques and systematic approaches to behavior analysis and change. Requires working in an interdisciplinary group to examine problems and education-based contributions to solutions.

ENVS 484 - The American Literature of Nature and Place (4)
Prereq: Junior standing or instructor permission.
Describes and explores the tradition of writing about the outdoors in American literature. The writings of Thoreau, Burroughs, Muir, Leopold, Carson, Eisley, Borland, Beston and others are read and discussed.

ENVS 486 - Field Methods in Environmental Education (5)
Prereq: ENVS 381 or ESTU 371; ENVS 382 or ESTU 372.
Students visit environmental learning sites and programs where they observe, critique and participate as instructors. Develop skill in designing effective and engaging lesson plans and delivering them to youth audiences. Includes field leadership, environmental interpretation, and instructional evaluation. A spring block course.

ENVS 487 - Conservation Psychology (4)
Prereq: Instructor Permission.
Principles of psychology applied to environmental problem-solving situations. Relationship between behavior and motivational, cognitive, social, moral-developmental, and cultural-psychological variables across the life span.

ENVS 489 - Leadership for a Sustainable Future (4)
Prereq: ENVS 381 or ESTU 371; ENVS 382 or ESTU 372.
Theory and practice of leadership for inspiring and maintaining change toward more ecologically sustainable behaviors through informal and formal learning settings. Emphasis on experiential approaches; field work required. A spring block course.

ENVS 493 - Environmental Impact Assessment (5)
Prereq: Senior standing and Huxley College admission, or instructor permission.
Environmental Impact Assessment requires a range of professional qualificatoins and involves a wide spectrum of disciplines and methodologies. This interdisciplinary capstone course involves class preparation of an impact assessment of a local project, summarizing physical, biological and social aspects of a study area. Review of pertinent laws and EIS documents. Also offered as ESCI 436.

ENVS 496 - Environmental Stewardship (5)
Prereq: BIOL 101 or BIOL 204; PLSC 250; ECON 206; MATH 114 or equivalent or higher; CHEM 121; ENVS 201 or ESTU 201; ENVS 202 or ESTU 202; ENVS 203 or EGEO 203; senior standing.
A field-oriented capstone course for environmental studies majors nearing graduation. Students work in interdisciplinary teams to apply their knowledge and skills to solve complex problems in real world situations.

ESTU 571 - Environmental Education Foundations (4)
Prereq: Graduate status or permission of instructor.
Examination of the principles and processes of education about and for the environment. Review of theory and practice of environmental education in a variety of programmatic settings.

ESTU 587 - Conservation Psychology (4)
Prereq: Enrollment in MEd in environmental education or permission of instructor.
Critical examination of the psychological and educational research bases for environmental education. Introduction to research methods used to integrate environmental behavior change, learning about the environment, development of environmental responsibility, and formation of ecological ethics, across the lifespan. Course employs lecture, discussion, student presentation, and research practica.

ESTU 588 - Language, Discourse and Environment (4)
This course focuses on the relationship between the metaphorical nature of language and discourse, with an end to better understand different views of the natural environment.

ESTU 589 - Curriculum in Environmental Education (5)
Examination of all aspects of curriculum for environmental education, especially in the non-formal setting of environmental learning centers, nature centers and outdoor schools. Curriculum theory and methodology appropriate to these settings will be studied, as will processes of curriculum design. Current programs and materials will be reviewed. Students will practice the skills of preparing curriculum and learning materials.

Engineering Technology Courses

ETEC 280 - Power Mechanics (5)
Design principles of major power sources: including Otto cycle, Clerk cycle, Diesel, Wankel, Stirling cycle and Rankine cycle engines.

ETEC 301 - Materials for Design (5)
Prereq: ETEC 110 or ETEC 112.
Fundamentals of materials technology for industrial design majors. Properties and processing of materials with an emphasis on plastics.

ETEC 314 - Junior Industrial Design I (5)
Prereq: Acceptance into junior industrial design program.
Studio course work emphasizing a comprehensive design methodology which includes market research, problem identification, idea generation, implementation and presentation. Additional focus on a team approach.

ETEC 316 - Junior Industrial Design II (5)
Prereq: ETEC 314
Studio course work focusing on the development of a concept from the research phase to a three-dimensional model that is submitted to a national competition. Emphasis on concise project explanation, descriptive drawings and quality photo-documentation of model.

ETEC 318 - Junior Industrial Design III (5)
Prereq: ETEC 316
Studio course work focusing on a collaborative project with industry. Assignments are jointly directed by the instructor and industry. Students are expected to relate to the industry sponsor as their client and perform their work professionally.

ETEC 327 - Manufacturing Economics (3)
Prereq: MATH 115 or higher; ETEC 246.
Examines many techniques to factor cost into manufacturing decisions. Topics covered include capital allocation, product cost estimating, work measurement, value engineering and budgeting.

Fairhaven Courses

FAIR 206A - Core: Science and Our Place on the Planet I (5)
Science and technology are systematic, self-critical, intellectual activities by which a culture seeks to understand and benefit from the physical phenomena of its world. This course addresses science in Western culture - its social and philosophical implications, its technological applications, its potential and its limitations. S/U grading.

FAIR 231N - Introduction to Applied Human Ecology: Sustainable Systems (3)
Study of relationships between human systems and the environment with an emphasis on the principle of sustainability. Study of models of sustainable development and appropriate technology complement practical applications in the Outback Farm/Wetland/Outdoor Learning Center. Student participation in instruction. S/U grading.

FAIR 330E – Ethnobotany (4)
Prereq: FAIR 206A or equivalent.
Study of how people use plants–as food, medicine, material goods, and symbolic and ceremonial elements of human culture. Includes a focus on plant identification, historical exploration of plant uses, and hands-on learning about wild edibles, plant domestication, herbal medicines, fibers and more. S/U grading.

FAIR 332N - Current Environmental Topics (2 TO 5)
Prereq: FAIR 206A or instructor permission.
The interdisciplinary context of current environmental issues, including the scientific basis for concern. Examples include acid rain, loss of genetic diversity, climate modification by logging, global warming, ozone depletion, overpopulation, nuclear waste disposal. Repeatable with various topics. S/U grading.

FAIR 335N - Visioning Sustainable Futures (4 TO 5)
Prereq: FAIR 201A or ENG 101, and previous course work/experience in sociopolitical/environmental issues from sociopolitical perspective.
A critical examination of alternative futures envisioned by various writers representing the world views of diverse cultures and communities of interest, in light of present-day sociopolitical, economic and environmental realities. Repeatable with different topics. S/U grading.

FAIR 336N - Topics in Science (4 TO 5)
Prereq: FAIR 206a or equivalent
The interdisciplinary exploration of specific topics in science, including health, reproductive science, ecology, energy, natural history, animal studies, botany, sustainability, the history of science, and science and society. Repeatable with different topics. S/U grading.

FAIR 340P - Sustainable Forestry (4)
Prereq: FAIR 206A or permission of instructor.
An examination of the development of forestry as an applied science in Europe & the U.S. and of forest management worldwide, asking what common conditions favor or promote sustainable approaches to forest management? Critical examination of sustainability itself as a guiding concept in natural resource management. Taught every other year. S/U grading.

FAIR 436N - Advanced Topics in Science (4 TO 8)
Prereq: FAIR 206A; 300-level science course or equivalent
An advanced examination of specific topics in science. Repeatable with different topics. S/U grading.

FAIR 440N - Ethnoecology: Conservation and Development (3)
Prereq: FAIR 206A or equivalent or permission of instructor.
Exploration of the role of traditional ecological knowledge in maintaining and restoring healthy ecological relationships between communities and the environment. Taught every other year. S/U grading.

Geology Courses

GEOL 204 - Geology and Society (3)
Prereq: GEOL 101 or BIOL 101 or CHEM 101 or PHYS 101 or permission of instructor.
Thematic approach to geology, with different themes exploring the relationship between scientific ways of knowing, and geology in particular, with society. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics. May be taken only once for GUR credit.

GEOL 570 - Landslides and Slope Stability (3)
Prereq: GEOL 310; GEOL 318 or GEOL 314 or equivalent
This seminar will review current research on landslides and slope stability, including: landslide types and processes; landslide triggering mechanisms; soil and rock slope stability; soil and rock slope failure modes; landslide hazard analysis. Offered alternate years.

History Courses

HIST 354 - Energy in American History (5)
Prereq: HIST 104 or equivalent.
An exploration of the uses and meanings of energy in American history. Topics include development of and transitions between different energy regimes; relations between energy producers and communities; energy and American foreign policy; and social, cultural, and environmental changes linked to changing patterns of energy production and consumption.

HIST 390 - Topics in History (5)
Prereq: Junior standing
Specialized topics in history. The subject of each individual course and its prerequisite will be announced in the Timetable of Classes. Repeatable with different topics.

HIST 460 - American Environmental History (5)
Prereq: HIST 103 or HIST 104; junior standing
History of the role and place of nature in American culture from the colonial era to the present, with some comparisons to significant and kindred human-nature interactions elsewhere. Will emphasize the history of cultural constructions of nature, on American perceptions and conceptions of nature, on the transnational character of many environmental problems and ideas, and on the environmental consequences of this.

HIST 553 - American Environmental History (4)
Prereq: Graduate status in history or permission of instructor.
Readings seminar focusing on the literature on the history of the interaction of nature and society in America. Concentration on methods in environmental history. Also offered as ESTU 553.

HIST 554 - World Environmental History (4)
The organizing theme of this seminar will be that of 'exchange' - biological and cultural - of organisms and ideas about what to do with them. By focusing on the problem of the history of exchanges of organisms and ideas about the environment around the globe, the seminar will at the same time illuminate other themes in world environmental history. Also offered as ESTU 554.

Health Education Courses

HLED 201 - Perspectives of Human Lifestyle and Wellness (3)
Overview and analysis of the role and place lifestyle and wellness play in society (past, present and future). Issues in health, fitness, and lifestyle choices.

Master of Business Administration Courses

MBA 585 - Seminar in Environmental Management (4)
Prereq: Admitted Graduate Student within College of Business and Economics.
This course stresses the appropriateness of assessing the impact(s) of corporate action on the natural environment. Primary consideration will be given to the organizational implications of shifting from the traditional input-process-output ('cradle-to-grave') organization model to an input-process-output-input ('cradle-to-cradle') mindset. Strategic business opportunities associated with an evolving consumer environmental consciousness will be explored.

Management Courses

MGMT 382 - Business and Its Environment (4)
Prereq: Majors only. MGMT 271.
A study of the business decision-making process as these decisions interact with the social, technological, political/legal and economic environments. The causes and effects of the regulation of business are developed and explored.

MGMT 359 - Greening Business Policy and Practice (4)
Prereq: Completion of Huxley ENVS Major Phase I or ESCI Major or CBE Major or permission of instructor.
This course will provide both a survey and applications of major U.S. and Washington state policies and practices supporting the greening of business. Also offered as ENVS 359.

MGMT 466 - Greening Business Applications (5)
Prereq: CBE Major or Huxley Major or permission of instructor; priority given to majors in Business and Sustainability. Senior status.
This course is an experiential capstone combining faculty and student teams from the College of Business and Economics and Huxley College of the Environment. Student groups prepare a Green Business Assessment for a community or campus organization and compile, distribute, and present a final report to the campus and the client organizations. Also offered as ENVS 466.

Marketing Courses

MKTG 384 - Marketing and Sustainability (4)
Prereq: MKTG 380. Declared Business and Substainability Majors Only. (CBE Majors take MKTG 474.)
This course will provide students with the skills for developing and marketing a sustainable product. It will cover key concepts and tools related to marketing mix decisions, such as product design-for-environment, pricing based on full cost accounting, greening of the supply chain, and life cycle impact assessment. Strategies for reducing the environmental impacts of products and services will be emphasized.

MKTG 474 - Marketing Strategies for Sustainability (4)
Prereq: Majors only. MKTG 381 and MKTG 382.
This course will provide students with the skills for developing and marketing a sustainable product. It will cover key concepts and tools related to marketing mix decisions, such as product design-for-environment, pricing based on full cost accounting, greening of the supply chain, and life cycle impact assessment. Strategies for reducing the environmental impacts of products and services will be emphasized.

MKTG 488 - Topics in Marketing (4)
Prereq: Majors Only. Vary by topic.
Varying topics in marketing such as distribution systems, marketing on the internet, geographic information systems in business and direct marketing. Repeatable with various topics to a maximum of 8 cr.

Master of Professional Accounting

MPAC 585 - Sustainability Accounting and Reporting (4)
Prereq: ACCT 343 or equivalent.
Through reading several books and examining some Triple Bottom Line (TBL)-related websites in detail, course participants will study the overall themes and examples of TBL offered by various authors and organizations. Our directed conversations will focus on an analysis and synthesis of these themes, the credibility the proposals and attempts, and the general applicability of the TBL concept.

Materials Science

MSCI 101 - The Materials Revolution (4)
Prereq: Freshman status or permission - FYE
An introductory course designed to facilitate a basic understanding of the materials science fundamentals behind the development of today's most important and innovative materials. Topics include: nanomaterials, smart materials, advanced composite materials, and semiconductors. Other important basics such as building materials from atoms, structures, synthesis, materials failures, and sustainability will also be covered.

Physics Courses

PHYS 102 - Physics and Contemporary Issues (3)
Prereq: Math 107 or higher.
Exploration of the relationships between basic physics concepts and broader social issues such as the generation of energy or global climate change; using scientific evidence to judge claims and construct arguments.

Political Science Courses

PLSC 436 - Managing Environmental Commons (5)
Prereq: One upper-division course in political science or instructor permission.
Explores how political, economic and social institutions affect the management and sustainability of shared environments, both local and global.

Psychology Courses

PSY 340 - Environmental Psychology (5)
Prereq: PSY 301 plus one from PSY 210-250
Theoretical, methodological and empirical problems and issues relating to behavior in constructed and natural environments.

Recreation Courses

RECR 379 - Foundations of Ecotourism (4)
Prereq: Phase I Recreation majors or permission of instructor.
Course will introduce students to the history, concepts, principles, marketing, and planning of ecotourism activities. The focus will be on tours and activities that promote cultural and environmental awareness, community empowerment, and local economic benefits. Emphasis will be on non-western cultures.

RECR 479 - Ecotourism: Principles and Practices (3)
Prereq: RECR 379 or permission of instructor.
Provides an understanding of the principles and practices of ecotourism. Examines theory, practice, history, terminology and issues in ecotourism planning and management. Emphasizes sustainable practices as they relate to traveler education, tour planning, and destination development.

RECR 480 - Leisure and Society (4)
Prereq: Phase III Recreation majors.
A senior capstone course that builds on general education and foundations of professional education. Goal is to synthesize diverse strands of theory and practice into an integrated understanding of recreation and leisure in modern society, with implications for professional service. Writing proficiency course.

Sociology Courses

SOC 255 - Social Organization of Criminal Justice (5)
A survey of basic concepts, problems and issues in the sociological study of social organizations applied to the criminal justice system.

SOC 352 – Criminology (5)
Prereq: Any one from: SOC 221, SOC 251, SOC 255, SOC 260, SOC 268 or SOC 269.
The study of adult crime, defined as violation of legal norms. Focuses on problems of measurement and attempts to explain crime as a social phenomenon and a cultural product. Includes in-depth analysis of various forms and classes of crimes and their victims.

SOC 356 - Law Enforcement and Society (5)
Prereq: Any one from: SOC 221, SOC 251, SOC 255, SOC 260, SOC 268 or SOC 269.
Review of research on the organization of law enforcement. Topics include impact of legal and organizational controls on police behavior, police us of deadly force, minorities and policing, and community policing.

SOC 388 - Sociology of Jails (5)
Prereq: Any one from: SOC 221, SOC 251, SOC 255, SOC 260, SOC 268 or SOC 269.
This course emphasizes sociological analysis of local jail operations, including populations, funding, management, legal, and regulatory aspects and roles of various professions operating in the jail environment.

SOC 452 - Advanced Criminology (5)
Prereq: SOC 302; and SOC 304 or PSY 302 or SOC 215; and SOC 306 or PSY 301 or SOC 210; and SOC 352.
An in-depth examination of selected areas in sociological criminology.

SOC 456 - Seminar in Policing (5)
Prereq: SOC 302; and SOC 304 or PSY 302 or SOC 215; and SOC 306 or PSY 301 or SOC 210.
Review of research on the organization of law enforcement. Topics include impact of legal and organizational controls on police behavior, police use of deadly force, minorities and policing, and community policing.