Guide for Students

All classes and instruction at Western will be offered remotely throughout spring quarter on our main campus, and at all centers, facilities and operations statewide. Spring quarter classes start Monday, April 6, and the quarter is expected to end as scheduled after final exams conclude on June 12.

Resources for a successful remote-learning experience are available at the Keep Learning website. Find the schedule for live webinars on using Zoom, Canvas and other technologies. New services for spring quarter are being offered such as at-home licensing for the Adobe Creative Cloud as well as extended laptop checkout for students who lack computer access at home.

Like the coronavirus site, these pages are living documents that we will continue to add to through the quarter. It is designed to be a place where you can find help for how to get connected and have a positive learning experience. There is a similar set of pages for Western's faculty members, to assist them as well. Do you have questions that aren't answered here, or ideas for support that can be addressed for the rest of campus? Email them to news@wwu.edu.

With input from the Faculty Senate and the Associated Students, and with the approval of the Provost, the University will continue during Summer Session and Summer Quarter 2020 to use the Pass/No Pass (P/NP) grading system for all undergraduate students, with the student option of requesting letter grades at the quarter’s conclusion.

Requesting letter grades:

Faculty will maintain rank grading (ABCDF) records during Summer, but the default reporting of grades for undergraduate students will be to receive either a P or a NP. Students will have until 07/24/2020, to request their letter grade be reported to their transcript, rather than their P/NP grade. Students may be advised to request their letter grade if required for accreditation or other purposes.

The handling of D grades and F grades:

For undergraduate students in Summer Session and Summer Quarter 2020, all grades of D+ and above will receive a P unless a student requests their letter grade. A grade of D or D- will be recorded as a NP, which will not earn credits or be reflected in the GPA. A student may elect to have a D or D- reported to their transcript, which will earn credits and be reflected in the GPA. A grade of F will be recorded as NP on the transcript, will not receive degree credit, and will not be reflected in the GPA. Departments requesting a different minimum grade for credit may petition their Dean and will announce the course grade rubric before the start of classes. This policy has no bearing on courses graded S/U.

Credit:

A grade of P during summer 2020 will count towards curricular, major, continuation, and graduation requirements.

Rationale:

The coronavirus pandemic led the university to shift to remote learning in spring of 2020, a modality that was new for many faculty and students. These uncharted learning conditions, coupled with the current social and economic instability our students are experiencing, will make Summer 2020 another challenging quarter. This policy offers a simple and consistent approach to assessment which should alleviate student anxiety and encourage a focus on learning.

During all quarters in which P/NP interim grading policies are in effect at the undergraduate level, the following policy will apply to graduate level courses, beginning Summer 2020.

PDF icon Graduate School Interim Grading Policy

Policy Highlights
  • Graduate students may choose P/NP grading for courses that are normally A-F letter-graded, excluding thesis courses. Courses graded S/U cannot be changed to P/NP.
  • Students who request P/NP must initiate the grade mode change two weeks prior to the end of the quarter, or one week prior to the end of summer quarter.
  • A minimum C- equivalent is required to receive a P grade. Programs may specify a higher passing grade, and must communicate that to students by the first day of the course.
  • Beginning Summer 2020, a maximum of 6 credits of P grades may be counted toward degree requirements. All spring 2020 P grades may apply to degree requirements, and do not count against the 6 maximum.

See the full policy in the PDF for further details.

Yes. With input from the Faculty Senate and the Associated Students, and with the approval of the Provost, the University will – with the modifications described in the link below – return for Fall Quarter 2020 to the standard and published grading policy. This temporary policy has no bearing on courses graded S/U or on grading in the Fairhaven College, which has its own grading policy. 

Find out more here: https://westerntoday.wwu.edu/news/campus-returning-to-standard-grading-policy-in-fall.

Teaching and Learning

Spring Quarter will be a different experience for all involved, instructors as well as students. We will get through the quarter together, and instructors are making every effort (and will continue to do so) to provide a quality course for you with specific and important learning objectives.

However, we want to acknowledge that the Governor’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order means Western needs to close the vast majority of spaces on campus to student use, even individual student use. This includes instructional labs, studios, and practice spaces. The order and Western’s actions taken to comply with it will mean a different educational experience for several groups of students. Western’s faculty understand this fact and are taking steps, as much as they can, to provide alternative experiences that are meaningful and advance your learning and career goals.

International Student FAQs

The U.S. government agreed to rescind the proposed July 6 SEVP guidance and return to the status quo as established by the M​arch 9, 2020 policy directive​ and the ​addendum issued on March 13, 2020​. SEVP released an updated F​requently Asked Questions for Stakeholders​ on July 15.

International students previously enrolled​ at WWU for spring quarter, will be allowed to stay in the U.S. or return to the U.S. for either online or in-person courses. Continuing students will not be required to register for face-to-face (F2F) courses to maintain F-1 status and will not require an updated I-20 with comments about the mode of instruction. Continuing students who wish to remain outside of the U.S. for fall quarter and take online courses will be allowed to maintain their F-1 status as long as they register full-time for fall quarter and continue to follow all F-1 regulations.

Incoming,​ new students who were not previously enrolled​ in March who will be entering the U.S. with an initial I-20 record will not be permitted to take 100% of courses online according to ​SEVP’s clarifying questions​ and broadcast message July 24.​ Students starting a new degree program at WWU who wish to enter the U.S. for fall quarter will be allowed to take online courses but must also register for at least one face-to-face (F2F) course to maintain F-1 status. Even if you have F2F classes, there is a possibility that you will not be issued an F-1 visa by the U.S. embassy/consulate, or there may still be travel restrictions in place and entering the U.S. may be difficult.

For new students​ who are planning to register for Fall classes and study from outside of the U.S., you may register for all remote/online classes. We highly recommend this plan as the safest option to get started on your academic path at Western. You can ask to defer your I-20 to Winter quarter and wait to get your visa at a later date. You are not required to take any minimum number of credits from outside the U.S.

Note: Students in our Intensive English Program or Global Pathway Program may have different regulations. Please e-mail iep@wwu.edu with questions about your specific situation.

Yes, based on the U.S. government’s ​agreement to rescind the proposed July 6 SEVP guidance and the updated July 15 ​Frequently Asked Questions for Stakeholders​ as well as clarification ​broadcast message July 24,​ continuing students who were previously enrolled for spring quarter will be allowed to remain in the U.S. or return to the U.S. to take all of their courses online. Based on WWU’s fall quarter course options, most courses will be offered online with limited exceptions for some experiential courses that can be taught safely in-person, such as applied performance classes and some hands-on labs. Your SEVIS I-20 record will remain valid as long as you maintain your F-1 status and enroll full-time.

Continuing students who were previously enrolled for spring quarter but wish to remain outside of the U.S. for fall quarter may take online courses and keep your SEVIS record active as l​ong as you register full-time for fall quarter and continue to follow all F-1 regulations. SEVP has confirmed the university can keep your SEVIS record active and you will be eligible for future benefits such as CPT and OPT as long as you maintain your F-1 status.

On July 24, 2020, SEVP posted a broadcast message on the ICE COVID-19 web page to clarify certain aspects of applying the March 2020 "status quo" guidance in the context of the fall 2020 term. There may be changes as universities and federal officials try to influence final rules so they don’t negatively impact international students. Our recommendations are based on the current SEVP guidance and this is the clearest way for you to stay in status at this time. We will send updates as we receive them.

 

Every student’s situation is different. WWU’s International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) office encourages you to contact us to understand your options. If you have additional questions or wish to meet with an ISSS adviser, contact isss@wwu.edu or call 360-650-7971.

If you are an English language student, please contact iep@wwu.edu with your questions.

You can find important dates and deadlines for fall quarter on Western’s registration calendar.

Student FAQs

While there is still much contingency planning underway, our current expectation is that fall quarter will start in person as scheduled on September 23 with a hybrid approach that allows for a mix of online and in-person classes.  This approach may include moving large lecture sections online together with smaller in-person seminars; moving small and medium-sized classes to larger lecture halls to ensure safe social distancing; and spreading classes across days and times with staggered end times to reduce class size and ensure safe social distancing.  All students will have the option of taking any class online instead of in person if they choose.

An academic planning committee is at work on recommendations, and we expect to issue more detailed guidance as soon as possible. 

Our fall plans will comply with Gov. Jay Inslee’s Safe Start Washington phased approach for reopening businesses, and it will be informed by guidance from the Washington State Department of Health and the Whatcom County Health Department.  

Paramount in all of our considerations is to protect the most vulnerable members of our community, and that means providing flexibility and support for those who may need to continue to work and study remotely.  Students will have online access to all in-person classes, and all faculty members will have the option to teach fully online.  Importantly, these contingency plans will also allow us to pivot to fully online should infection and hospitalization rates spike again in the fall.  

In this time of uncertainty, we are working to provide those in need with resources in the local community and on campus. Several offices from across campus are partnering to provide available resources for students, including the creation of a resources website that includes an intake form to assess student needs.

After a student submits the intake form, a staff member will contact them with personalized assistance. Examples of assistance might be a grocery gift card, swipes for meals in a dining commons, assistance with emergency housing, and/or laundry cards.  

This work is a collaboration with Western’s Office of Financial Aid, Western Hub of Living Essentials (WHOLE) Pantry, Associated Students, Off-Campus Living, the Western Foundation, Western Success Scholars program, Dining Services, Residence Life, Office of Sustainability, the Outback Farm and the Office of Student Life. We will continue to assess emerging needs to best match with resources and hope to continue to provide students with support in this trying times.   

Yes. WWU applied for federal CARES Act funding for students on April 21, and received $5.8 million to expend over the next year as grants for Western students who have incurred expenses from disruption of campus operations due to COVID-19. Find out more in this article.

To receive federal CARES Act funding, you must meet these criteria: 

  • Incurred expenses from disruption of campus operations due to COVID-19 

  • Filed a FAFSA in 2019-2020 or 2020-2021 and are eligible to receive Federal Title IV student aid 

  • Are currently enrolled in a degree-seeking program 

  • Aren’t currently in financial aid suspension 

Apply here: https://www.finaid.wwu.edu/.

To declare in a major, minor, or certificate, please submit the appropriate form from the list below to the department, following the routing instructions on the form:

Declare a Major: Major Declaration and Change Web Form

Declare a Minor: Minor Declaration and Change Web Form

Declare a Certificate: Certificate Declaration and Change Web Form

If you are approved into the program of your choice, the Registrar's Office will declare you into the program once the form is approved to our office. Once the major/minor/certificate is declared, you will receive an automated email to your WWU email account. 

All questions – including if you are denied acceptance into a program – should be directed to the academic department. 

To register in an Independent Study (ISP) Course, please complete and submit the Directed Independent Study and Registration Authorization Form to the instructor of the course. The instructor will then approve or deny the form and send to the Registrar's Office. Once the ISP course is created, you will registered in the course and you will receive an automated email to your WWU email account.

Students who are have not received responses to instructor emails and are unable to access their classes should reach out to their department chairs for further guidance. Contact information for chairs can be found in Western's Departmental Directory.

An 'asynchronous' or fully online course is delivered such that students can complete the work at any time in a day (or sometimes a week). These courses do not require that faculty or students be at their computer during the scheduled class time. In a 'synchronous' or remote class students must be online during the regularly scheduled class time. This structure is most like a face-to-face class and can involve typical lectures delivered via Zoom or another tool.

While seating and room size are typically part of our assessment of capacity, it is still the case that capacity issues matter in the remote learning environment that we will be operating in this spring.  Faculty and departments make decisions about the appropriate size of classes in order to provide an optimal learning experience, whether face-to-face or online.  In some cases, remote teaching can produce a heavier assessment and grading burden on faculty, as well.  Capacity is a function of many considerations.

In light of the most recent recommendations from the CDC to limit the size of all social and public gatherings, along with the Governor’s March 23 “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order for the State of Washington, Western Libraries will be closed to the public until further notice. 

We recognize the importance of library collections to Western’s teaching, learning, and research missions. However, at least for the duration of the Governor’s “Stay Home, Stay Safe” order, it will not be possible to loan items from the Western Libraries’ circulating collection. Likewise, the Orbis Cascade Alliance has suspended Summit borrowing until further notice.  

Once it is again safe to do so, circulation of physical materials will resume, and Libraries will communicate new information as soon as it becomes available. Please also know that the due date for all materials checked out to patrons will be extended to June 15 (except for items already due after that date).  Recalls will not be possible during this period.

While the Libraries’ physical buildings and collections are not accessible at this time, the Libraries is committed to providing as much online access to collections, services, and support as possible. Please see the web pages: Library Services and Access to Materials FAQs and the Teaching and Learning FAQs for more information. 

Additionally, If you would like to request a title in electronic format, please submit a purchase request via ILLiad and specify e-book as the format. We are happy to purchase electronic copies of books if they are available, meet other standard purchase criteria, and are financially feasible. If you have a specific question, please contact Library.Collections@wwu.edu.

We want to stay connected to each other during these difficult times, and we encourage you to reach out to us and share any questions, concerns, and comments you may have, (or even if you just want to say hello!).  Please remember we are still here with you, even if we are not all in the same building. You can always email us at LibraryCommunications@wwu.edu, or check out our full staff directory for more customized contact information. 

Accommodations for students with disabilities are determined through an individualized process which takes place between the student and the Disability Access Center (DAC). Though students may already have accommodations in place, new or different accommodations may be appropriate for the online setting. If you have questions about the accessibility of your course or would like assistance and support implementing accommodations, please contact the DAC: DRSfrontdesk@wwu.edu or 360-650-3083.

Many campus services are operating remotely, including: 

The Academic Technology and User Services (ATUS) Help Desk is available by phone and email from 8am to 5pm on weekdays. Helpful articles and service request forms are available at http://atus.wwu.edu. Walk-in tech support is not currently available in HH 123, but in-person support can be scheduled when necessary. Contact the Help Desk at helpdesk@wwu.edu, or at (360) 650-3333.

Students who lack computer access at home can request a laptop with a loan through the end of the term. 

For more information about building closures and guidelines at your campus location, go to: 

Technology Assistance:

 

The computer labs will be open on all OC campuses (Bremerton, Poulsbo, Shelton) starting July 6th through Fall quarter and are anticipated to be open until 9 p.m. on weeknights. 

Counseling Services: If you are feeling anxious or need someone to talk to:

Everett-based students: Chett Hill, WWU Everett’s Mental Health Counselor, will be available for virtual appointments. Please contact him directly at chett.hill@comcast.net  to schedule an appointment. All WWU Everett students receive three free sessions with Chett. Please let him know you are a WWU Everett student when you schedule your appointment.

Bremerton/Poulsbo-based students: Students in Bremerton and Poulsbo can access up to three counseling sessions through Olympic College each academic year. Students may reach out to Trish Christean with Olympic College: 360-475-7233 or tchristean@olympic.edu. Please let her know you are a WWU student when you make your appointment.

Port Angeles-based students: Peninsula Behavioral Health (PBH) Counselors will be available to assist students.  Students should call 360-457-0431 and ask to speak to the Access Department. Students should identify themselves as WWU students so they can bypass the normal lengthy intake process. All WWU Port Angeles students receive three free sessions with PBH.

Library/Writing Support: Western offers a wide variety of library services remotely, including support in research and writing - essay drafts, project components, scholarship applications, resumes -- they will be available to assist you online.

All Western students and employees are expected to follow the University’s Reporting Communicable Diseases Policy (POL-U1000.12) if they have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms. They should complete the COVID-19 Self Reporting Form, which notifies Western’s Student Health Center and is used to determine appropriate follow-up for addressing the needs of the campus community. 

Healthcare options for site-based students outside of Bellingham include:

1)      Contacting their primary healthcare provider

2)      Calling the Washington State Department of Health at 800-525-0127

3)      Accessing free e-visits by MultiCare Virtual Care to anyone who has COVID-19 symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath).


Health officials will guide students on next steps. All Western students are also encouraged to visit Western’s coronavirus website and the state and regional health departments in their area for the latest information and announcements:

Washington State Department of Health Coronavirus Information
Snohomish County Health Department
King County Health Department
Kitsap County Health Department
Clallam County Health & Human Services

Generally, if a host site is still accepting our students, then internships, student teaching and other experiential learning that is currently in place may continue as planned.

Faculty or staff advisors commonly evaluate the acceptability of a host site for meeting the objectives of their department’s experiential learning program and a formal relationship with that host site is established. As a precaution, and if practical, advisors may wish to ask their host site liaison what they are doing to protect their employees, clients and interns from transmitting and contracting COVID-19. That information should be passed along to our students.

Students who are responsible for evaluating and selecting their own host site for their experiential learning activities may wish to ask their host site representative about COVID-19 protection measures as well. Students should be instructed to weigh the risks and benefits and then make the best choice for the own health, safety and well-being.

Students should be instructed to closely follow the policies and procedures of their host sites, including required prevention measures, screening for symptoms, personal protective equipment (e.g. face mask, gloves and gowns), social distancing and reporting when they feel sick or suspect they may have COVID-19 symptoms.

Also, a student’s professional credentialing organization may be relaxing the field experience and clinical practice requirements in light of COVID-19. For example, the Washington State Professional Educator Standards Board (PESB) has done this for student educators.

Notwithstanding the above, host sites that are experiencing a COVID-19 outbreak should be avoided. Requests for exceptions should be directed to Paul Mueller, Director of Risk, Compliance and Policy Services at x3065.

Faculty, staff or students who know or suspect they have COVID-19 should follow applicable guidance posted in the Frequently Asked Questions.

Additional Resources

University Policy POL-U2100.03-Managing the Risk of Off Campus Experiential Learning Programs

University’s Experiential Learning Online Risk Management Toolkit

Gov. Inslee announces new rules to protect older adults in nursing homes, assisted living facilities

 

The Haggard Hall computer labs (101 and 112) will open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, starting April 6, but only for students who lack technology to participate in online learning from home. Students must self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms and practice social distancing.

Yes, you can access computer labs remotely. Many labs are open to all students and some are department-specific.

Wireless access is available in the Haggard Hall computer labs (101 and 112). Students must self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms and practice social distancing.

Red Square also has excellent outdoor wireless signal.

The first day of class, please contact your professor, via Canvas or e-mail, about your intent to remain in the class. If your instructor can’t help you, they will forward your message to ATUS for additional assistance.

No. Field courses are subject to the same limitations as other face-to-face classes.  Faculty will need to explore other arrangements for delivering their course materials.

Generally, field courses are curriculum-required courses where learning or research takes place in a natural environment with a small cohort of students under the supervision of a field course leader. Students are provided a supervised, practical experience that applies classroom knowledge, theory, and skills of their discipline in the field.

Because of the shift to remote delivery of courses, you will need to get access to the online resources for the course. In order to get that access, you will need to register for the course. If there is available seating in the course, you can register now through Web4U. Otherwise, be sure to get on the waiting list for the course. Please review the important dates and deadlines on the Registrar’s Office website.

Yes, you will be cleared to register for the fall term if you were eligible to enroll this spring term but chose to sit out. Western will be waiving the application and the fee for those returning students.

Academic Year Self-Sustaining courses do not receive state support and are funded completely by Western, which means they cost more in tuition. AYSS courses are noted as such in both Classfinder and Web4U Registration and the per credit tuition rate is posted as $265/credit.


For students who are enrolled in fewer than ten credits, the AYSS courses offer an option with little cost difference, but students who enroll in 10-18 credits may be best served by finding similar state-supported class sections.

While the state does not provide funding for AYSS courses, Western is committed to serving students across Washington, and chooses to provide access to a wider depth and breadth of courses than students would otherwise have access to. 

WTA is limiting the number of people that can ride on its fixed route buses to no more than 12 passengers. Up to 15 will be allowed if those riding together are couples or parents with children.

If it appears there are already 12 people on board, the driver will ask anyone waiting at a stop to wait for the next bus.

When possible, WTA is running “trailers,” or extra buses on routes that have been attracting higher ridership. While fixed route ridership is down nearly 80 percent, there are some routes where the number of riders is limiting people’s ability to maintain a safe distance.

WTA continues to urge people to ride the bus for essential trips only, such as trips to the grocery store, pharmacy, or to keep medical appointments. Riders should plan extra time in case the bus they are waiting for has reached its maximum capacity.

Buses on routes around the university are likely to meet the maximum capacity. In addition to making essential trips only, WTA urges students to walk or bike as much as possible, or to drive alone if that is the only alternative.

Fares continue to be free until further notice. All riders enter and exit the bus using the rear door, unless they need they need to use the ramp. 

Until further notice WTA is providing Saturday levels of service five days a week (Monday through Friday), and a Sunday level of service on Saturdays and Sundays.

For questions, please call (360) 676-7433.

Class material falls under copyright law; recording and posting Zoom-type class sessions without the permission of the instructor is against university policy. If a student needs to record a session as part of an accommodation, the student should work with the instructor and the Disability Access Center to ensure that accommodation can be made.

The steps we are taking to ensure safe social distancing in classrooms will be augmented by a host of other changes that may include an indefinite prohibition on gatherings above a specified size, continued limitations on visitors to campus and travel away from campus, use of face coverings and other protective equipment, and frequent deep cleaning of facilities.  As planning groups develop recommendations, we expect to issue more detailed guidance. 

Paramount in all of our considerations is to protect the most vulnerable members of our community, and that means providing flexibility and support for those who may need to continue to work and study remotely.  Students will have online access to all in-person classes, and all faculty members will have the option to teach fully online.  Importantly, these contingency plans will also allow us to pivot to fully online should infection and hospitalization rates spike again in the fall.  

Western recognizes the importance of health and safety as we return to campus.  Following the Governor’s phased approach to reopening, Western’s Incident Command team is working on general guidelines to support the gradual return of employees to campus.  Further communication will be provided as guidance is developed. 

We are encouraged that the Whatcom County Health Department believes there will be sufficient capacity to test students before the start of classes in September, as well as capacity to conduct testing throughout the academic year.   

The university’s medical team is working with public health officials on an overall COVID-19 healthcare plan for the region that takes into account the City of Bellingham, Whatcom County and the WWU campus community.  Among the pending planning decisions are the frequency of testing required, testing for asymptomatic individuals, contact tracing and isolation models.   

At this time, we do not anticipate requiring a COVID-19 test for students, faculty and staff unless we are directed to do so by state health officials, however, all members of the University community are encouraged to stay home if you are not feeling well, and to familiarize yourself with common COVID-19 symptoms via this self-assessment tool based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria.  Further updates will be shared by email and posted on the Student Health Center website as soon as possible. 

Continuing students register during Phase I, June 17 – July 17, by appointment, as determined by earned credits. New students(Transfer, First-year Freshmen and Running Start) register at Transitions and Fall Advising & Orientation programs.

Yes. With input from the Faculty Senate and the Associated Students, and with the approval of the Provost, the University will – with the modifications described in the link below – return for Fall Quarter 2020 to the standard and published grading policy. This temporary policy has no bearing on courses graded S/U or on grading in the Fairhaven College, which has its own grading policy. 

Find out more here: https://westerntoday.wwu.edu/news/campus-returning-to-standard-grading-policy-in-fall.

 

Graduate Student FAQs

If you are able to work from home, current guidance recommends that you do so. If you work in a research laboratory, consult with your advisor on specific practices for your lab. A current list of building and program closures and suspensions is available on the coronavirus information page under cancellations and closures.

If you are a teaching assistant, please refer to the FAQ for TAs. For all other graduate students, please see the Student Health Center insurance plan website. Several coverage options are available for both the academic year and summer. In addition to the policy offered by Western’s private insurance partner, you may also qualify for one or more options under Washington Apple coverage.

Student Services

Online Support

As students go online, so have efforts to support student success, including:  

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising Center is available remotely during spring quarter, offering phone and virtual advising appointments via Zoom. To schedule, please call 360-650-3850. Online resources are available on the Academic Advising Center's Website and you can also email advising@wwu.edu

General Advising Tips

Seek advising quarterly: All students are encouraged to seek advising at least once a quarter. Students declared in a major or minor should contact their academic department and assigned adviser to track progress. The Academic Advising Center and Student Outreach Services are also resources to support academic planning and navigation of campus resources. 

  • Degree Works: Track your progress toward degree completion. Advisors can assist with understanding your unofficial degree evaluation. 
  • University Catalog: Western’s official source for majors, courses, academic policies and more.   
  • Advising Tools & Resources: Includes links to important online resources, including a GPA Calculator. 

Registrar’s Office

The Registrar’s Office staff continue to provide essential services by email and phone. Please email us at Registrar.Office@wwu.edu or call during business hours, Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm, 360-650-3432.

Declare a Major: Major Declaration and Change Web Form

Declare a Minor: Minor Declaration and Change Web Form

Declare a Certificate: Certificate Declaration and Change Web Form

Register for an ISP Course: Directed Independent Study and Registration Authorization Form

Visit our important dates and deadlines calendar!

Healthcare Options

Healthcare

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, do not visit a healthcare provider without calling first. Health officials will guide students on next steps.

Counseling Services

The Counseling Center is offering tele-mental health services during spring quarter. Contact the Counseling Center to learn more.  

Everett-based students 

Chett Hill, WWU Everett’s Mental Health Counselor, will be available for virtual appointments. Please contact him directly at chett.hill@comcast.net  to schedule an appointment. All WWU Everett students receive three free sessions with Chett. Please let him know you are a WWU Everett student when you schedule your appointment.

Bremerton/Poulsbo-based students

Students in Bremerton and Poulsbo can access up to three counseling sessions through Olympic College each academic year. Students may reach out to Trish Christean with Olympic College: 360-475-7233 or tchristean@olympic.edu. Please let her know you are a WWU student when you make your appointment.

Port Angeles-based students

Peninsula Behavioral Health (PBH) Counselors will be available to assist students.  Students should call 360-457-0431 and ask to speak to the Access Department. Students should identify themselves as WWU students so they can bypass the normal lengthy intake process. All WWU Port Angeles students receive three free sessions with PBH.

Technology Assistance

ATUS Classroom Services/Equipment Loan have established extended laptop loan programs for students without access to a computer. Students who need a laptop should complete a request to arrange to safely pick up a laptop.

Students without wi-fi may access campus wi-fi in the large Fraser lecture hall (102). Students must self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms and practice social distancing.

Students can access computer lab workstations remotely. Many labs are open to all students and some are department-specific

Students are encouraged to prepare for their spring classes by reviewing the Keep Learning recommendations, which include strategies for becoming familiar with approaches, tools and operations likely to be used in your spring classes.

Everett-based students

Technology assistance will be limited to remote support due to Governor Inslee’s Stay Home, Stay Healthy order. Support will be offered through the WSU Help Desk as of the spring quarter start on Monday, April 6. Remote support is available Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m -8 p.m. and Fridays, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. To access support:

Call: WSU IT Help Desk at 425-405-1555.

Email: everett.it@wsu.edu

Virtual via Zoom: https://wsu.zoom.us/my/everett.it or Zoom meeting ID: 425-405-1555

Bremerton/Poulsbo-based students

For technology support, contact the OC Help Desk at: 360-475-7600.

Port Angeles-based students

WWU is currently working with Peninsula College to address access issues. Contact your program coordinator if you have questions or need information at this time.

Learning from Home

Learning online will take more motivation and attention than in-person classes, with one of the biggest hurdles being the environment. Home, be it in Bellingham or elsewhere, is where we relax and unwind after a long day of work. But now it's where all the work will get done.

Here are some ways you can create a good learning environment at home:

Set up a “home office” that’s quiet and well lit, away from distractions. If you are not using your phone for class, consider leaving your phone in another room.

Be aware of your notifications. Push notifications on your phone or other device could cause distraction. Be aware of these and consider turning them off while you work/study.

Set up a routine and schedule that includes getting up at a regular time, getting ready (and out of those PJs) and getting to work. 

Manage your time. Time management is an essential skill to have as a student and even more important when you are learning remotely. Managing your time will keep you focused, on track and making progress in your studying and assignments.

Try the time blocking Pomodoro Technique. Essentially, to prevent burnout, work 25 minutes then take a 5-minute break. After four 25-minute segments, take a longer 15-minute break to stretch, step outside, etc.

Make time for lunch instead of snacking through lectures – crinkling can distract other students during a video call.

Don’t work in bed. Doing so can associate work/school stress with what’s supposed to be a relaxing environment – doing work in a different area helps with compartmentalization.

Move around. Getting up at least once an hour to stretch, walk around, etc. will boost concentration and give you a brief mental break. These are additional best practices for healthy distance learning.

Be open to learning new technology. There are many of resources available to help students learn in a remote way including Zoom and Microsoft Teams. Check them out and see how they might help you stay connected.

Accommodations

Accommodations for students with disabilities are determined through an individualized process which takes place between the student and the Disability Access Center (DAC). Though students may already have accommodations in place, new or different accommodations may be appropriate for the online setting. If you have questions about the accessibility of your course or would like assistance and support implementing accommodations, please contact the DAC: DRSfrontdesk@wwu.edu or 360-650-3083.