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WWU / Fairhaven College of Interdiscipinary Studies

World Issues Forum: Spring 2014

The World Issues Forums occur weekly on Wednesdays from 12:00-1:20pm each quarter.

All events are free and everyone is welcome. See our college calendar to view this schedule by date, where the World Issues Forum events are listed in red.

 

video - Subscribe to our World Issues Forum Channel to see videos as they become available.

 

Co-sponsors include:

Fairhaven College is grateful to our valued co-sponsors: Anthropology, Canadian American Studies, WWU Diversity Fund, Women’s Studies.

 

 

Spring 2014 Schedule
Date & Time Lecture

Wed 4/9

12:00 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven

Auditorium

 

VIDEO >

#joya“Goliath: Living and Loathing in Israel”

Max Blumenthal, author, journalist, filmmaker and blogger.

 

 

In Goliath, New York Times bestselling author Max Blumenthal takes us on a journey through the badlands and high roads of Israel-Palestine, painting a startling portrait of Israeli society under the siege of increasingly authoritarian politics as the occupation of the Palestinians deepens.

 

Wed 4/16

12:00 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven Auditorium

 

VIDEO >

“Traditional Justice as an Alternative for Child Soldiers”

James Pirtle, Seattle trial lawyer

 

The presentation entails the tragic story of Thomas Kwoyelo, former child soldier turned Commander in the Lord's Resistance Army in Uganda. He is the first combatant to be slated for trial in the new International Crimes Division of the High Court of Uganda. Kwoyelo's defense team won his case on appeal on equal protection grounds (though the government has refused to release him). We will discuss the status of this case, moral culpability, the plight of the child soldier, and the lasting consequences on the accused, the state, and the victims of rebellion."

 

Thurs 4/16

4:00-5:00pm

Academic West 304

 

VIDEO >

Aljamal yaghi

"Gaza Writes Back”

Refaat Alareer, Yousef Aljamal, Rawan Yaghi, young writers from Gaza

 

Three of fifteen young writers in Gaza, members of a generation that has suffered immensely under Israel’s siege and blockade, especially during and following Israel’s 2008-2009 offensive known as “Operation Cast Lead”, share experiences that have fundamentally impacted their lives. Their stories are acts of resistance and defiance, proclaiming the endurance of Palestinians and the continuing resilience and creativity of their culture in the face of ongoing obstacles and attempts to silence them. Whether tackling the tragedy that surrounds missile strikes and home raids, or the everyday indignities encountered by Palestinian refugees, through their writing these authors have brought to life the real issues that the people of Gaza face.

 

Wed 4/23

12:00 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven Auditorium

 

VIDEO >

“Water: Why it Matters & How it is Changing the World"

Sheila Muxlow, Campaign Director with the Water Wealth Project

 

 

Join water champion Sheila Muxlow for an informative and interactive workshop on water and the threats and opportunities we have to transform the status quo into a state of sustainability. Thinking globally while acting locally, Sheila will share her expertise with International Development and her experiences of working on water issues in Canada. The workshop will dive into the topics of fracking, tar sands, hydro projects and coal, while also sharing some hope in the opportunities campaigning on water protection provide to build a mainstream movement to counter the insatiable push for unsustainable economic growth. Join water champion Sheila Muxlow for an informative and interactive workshop on water and the threats and opportunities we have to transform the status quo into a state of sustainability. Thinking globally while acting locally, Sheila will share her expertise with International Development and her experiences of working on water issues in Canada. The workshop will dive into the topics of fracking, tar sands, hydro projects and coal, while also sharing some hope in the opportunities campaigning on water protection provide to build a mainstream movement to counter the insatiable push for unsustainable economic growth.

 

Wed 4/30

12:00 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven

Auditorium

 

 

VIDEO >

#marlowe

"Water Everlasting?"

Julienne Gage, traditional producer and multimedia journalist

 

 

"Water Everlasting?" looks at the management of Haiti's most essential resource in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. That topic opens a broader dialogue about development in the Western Hemisphere's poorest country. Can Haiti ever recover? Where do those billions of dollars in international aid money go? What will it take to get Haiti moving toward a more sustainable future? Rather than make a typical PR video highlighting just the successful parts of a project, Julienne and her crew opted to explore the complexities of a work in progress.

 

Mon 5/5

12:00 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven Auditorium

 

VIDEO >

#thrush

“Not 1 More Deportation”

Maru Mora Villalpando, Latina immigrant organizer and consultant for non-profits working for racial justice, Latino Advocacy

 

 

Wed 5/7

12:00 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven Auditorium

 

VIDEO >

#sheehansteven

“A Different Kind of Travel: Global Inquiries ”

 

 

Brittaney Schunzel & Steven Riley, Fairhaven College Adventure Learning Grant recipients, 2012

 

The planet at large is a dense and complicated network of human relationships, environment and opportunities. When it comes to global inquiry, we set the guidelines for how we create meaningful engagements and dialogue with the world. What are we going to say and how are we going to do it? Steven Riley and Brittaney Schunzel will speak to their individual experiences traveling throughout Egypt, Mongolia and China and creating dialogue abroad through Fairhaven's Adventure Learning Grant in 2012-2013.

 

Wed 5/14

12:00 - 1:00pm

Fairhaven

Auditorium

 

VIDEO >

“Climate Change in Bangadesh: Confronting a Mega-Disaster ”

Harun Rashid, PhD Emeritus Professor, Dept. of Geography & Earth Science University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

 

Average annual temperatures in Bangladesh have increased around 1 ºC between 1950 and 2008. Less uniform are increases in annual rainfall. The frequency of high-magnitude floods and more intense tropical cyclones has increased significantly, especially during the last 50 years. Sea level has been rising 4-8 mm/year along the Bangladesh coast. Depending on the population projection for 2100, a 1-meter rise in sea level would constitute a mega-disaster for Bangladesh, likely displacing between 29 million and 41 million of coastal population. To confront this mega-disaster, the demand for financial compensation for damage based on the “polluter pays” principle may not be tenable for either intergenerational distributive justice or corrective justice. Therefore, international technical and financial assistance for a range of climate change adaptation projects would, perhaps, provide a more realistic way of achieving a semblance of climate justice for Bangladesh.

 

Wed 5/21

12:00 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven Auditorium

 

VIDEO >

“The Three U.S.-Mexico Border Wars: An Update”

Tony Payan, PhD, Political Science professor at University of Texas, El Paso

 

North America is pulled in two different directions: reaffirmation of the nation-state, with implications for border controls, or the inevitability of globalization with its particular meaning for border flows. Twenty years after NAFTA, the three countries of North America have failed to take advantage of a unique historical opportunity to move the status of borders from lines of defense and opposition to lines of encounter and institutionalized cooperation. Border structures are ever more rigid; vested interests in border closing still growing; and political leadership lacking. Overlooked are the lives of tens of millions of people who have had their economic prosperity curtailed, mobility truncated, and sense of security upset by unprecedented deployment of technology and force, both of which are channeled into controlling rather than efficiently managing our borders.

 

Thur 5/15, 9:00am-3:00pm, VU 565

Professor Payan will also be addressing “North America Adrift: Understanding the Successes and Failures of NAFTA” at the Border Policy Research Institute Conference Beyond Nafta: Thinning the Border to Strengthen North American Competitiveness.

Wed 5/28

12:00 - 1:20pm

Fairhaven Auditorium

 

VIDEO >

#kriz

"Adventures in Hospital Land: The Semiotics and Sadism of the U.S. Medical Industrial Complex.”

Wendy Susan Simonds, Professor of Sociology at Georgia State University

 

This talk centers on the visual culture of medical institutions, or what I call "Hospital Land," through a discussion of photographs I began taking during the chemotherapy treatment of my friend and former colleague, Chet Meeks, in 2007¬ and continued to take thereafter, at other medical events

I attended (without Chet). I use these photographs to comment on the ways in which science and medicine ¬ and ultimately, authoritarian institutions more generally ¬ instruct us, seeking to generate and then direct particular forms of behavior in the service of institutional goals.

I will describe how my perceptions of and strategies for coping with Hospital Land have changed as I¹ve aged, and as I¹ve become increasingly (personally and professionally) attentive to the contradictions and complexities of medicalization. My goal is to illuminate broad cultural in/sensibilities and conventions around health care, mortality, and identity in ways that I hope will serve as an intellectually engaging and personally useful guide for understanding and coping with Hospital Land.

 

 

 

   

 

Speaker Biographies

Max Blumenthal is an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The Daily Beast, The Nation, The Huffington Post, the Independent Film Channel, Salon.com, Al Jazeera English and other publications. He is the author of the bestselling book Republican Gomorrah. His new book, just published, is Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israel (Nation Books).,

James D. Pirtle represents clients in all aspects of international human rights, equal protection, civil litigation, appellate practice, cross-border litigation, and criminal defense. His cases include international human rights defense, war crimes, civil and criminal state and federal appeals, civil litigation, cross-border cases, and criminal defense. He is part of the landmark legal team on the Thomas Kwoyelo trial in Uganda and is currently assisting in the challenge to Uganda's infamous Anti-Homosexuality Bill. James is licensed in Washington, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, the United States District Court for the Western District of Washington, and he takes cases pro hac vice in Africa. James is a former naval aviator who received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy from Western Washington University and his Juris Doctorate from Seattle University School of Law. While in law school, James studied international bioethics and international war crimes in Ireland and the Czech Republic. James is a world traveler, enjoys boating, and is an aficionado of spicy food

Refaat Alareer, editor of and contributor to Gaza Writes Back, is an academic living in Gaza. He received his M.A. in Comparative Literature from the University College of London (U.K.) and is currently completing his Ph.D. in English Literature at the Universiti Putra Malaysia. He has also been teaching world literature, comparative literature, and both fiction and non-fiction creative writing at the Islamic University of Gaza since 2007.

 

Rawan Yaghi describes life in Gaza under the constant threat of Israeli F16s: I was fourteen when the AbuSelmeyyas’ house was attacked by an F16 air strike. My body shivers as I write this. The attack killed the father and mother and seven of their children, Nasrallah 4, Aya 7, Yahya 9, Eman 12, Huda 14 who was my classmate in primary school.

 

Yosef Aljamal

Sheila Muxlow was raised with the home waters of Chilliwack, BC on the territories of the Sto:lo Indigenous people. She comes to water advocacy after nearly a decade of working on social and environmental justice issues spanning concerns with sexism, racism, war, free trade & natural resource extraction. Sheila is grounded within a respect for the rights and responsibilities of people who call a place home, and believes that long-term solutions to water problems need to come from a local level of planning, monitoring and enforcement. Sheila has a Liberal Arts diploma from the University of the Fraser Valley and a degree in International Development and Globalization studies from the University of Ottawa. Sheila spent several years living and working in Australia, China and Ethiopia before moving to Edmonton, Alberta in 2006 to work as the Prairie Regional Organizer with the Council of Canadians and then later as the Director with the Sierra Club Prairie Chapter. Sheila is now the Campaign Director with the WaterWealth Project based out of her home town. The project goal is 100% community control over decisions affecting their local home waters, recognizing that long term solutions to the protection of fresh water and the benefits that we all enjoy from our water wealth can only be achieved with a recognition and inclusion of First Nations rights and title and authentic relationships between people who call the region home. The WaterWealth project has been defined by their community engagement techniques which focus on what people have in common, rather than the issues that split people apart.

Maru Mora Villalpando is a Latina immigrant organizer and consultant for non-profits working for racial justice. Ms Villalpando is a trainer, political analyst for local Latino media outlets, speaker, and panelist on immigrant rights. An expert on non-profit organizations, Ms Villalpando has conducted numerous bilingual and monolingual trainings throughout the State, ranging from basic community organizing 101, legal rights for undocumented workers, how the legislative process works, using local and national media outlets for community organizing, developing long-term organizing strategies for social change and immigration policy. Ms. Villalpando organized a successful campaign in Snohomish County to ensuring interpretation for immigrants in two local hospitals, led the effort to defeat anti-immigrant bills in the 2011 State Legislative session, founded and coordinated a statewide coalition in pro-active legislation for immigrant rights in the state. Ms Villalpando recently coordinated a Latino voter registration in three counties, helped lead an educational campaign for equal marriage for gay and lesbian Latino couples as well as doing outreach for the Latino community in support of Referendum 74, and coordinated a statewide coalition working to introduce the Washington Trust Act.

Ms. Villalpando has recently focused her organizing efforts in stopping deportations and supporting a hunger strike of immigrant detainees demanding better conditions at the privately run NW Detention Center in Tacoma, WA and Conroe, TX, Joe Corley Detention Center.

Brittaney Schunzel & Steven Riley, students of Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies and Fairhaven College Adventure Learning Grant recipients in 2012.

Juliene Gage is a multimedia communications specialist at the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC. She is currently producing a series of documentaries about strengthening public institutions in Haiti. The first one, "Water Everlasting?" looks at management of Haiti's most essential resource in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. That topic opens a broader dialogue about development in the Western Hemisphere's poorest country. Can Haiti ever recover? Where did those billions of dollars in international aid money go? What will it take to get Haiti moving toward a more sustainable future? Rather than make a typical PR video highlighting just the successful parts of a project, Julienne and her crew opted to explore the complexities of a work in progress.

Prior to joining the IDB in 2013, Julienne spent more than a decade working as a print reporter and network news producer, focusing on migration in Europe and the United States and the root causes of poverty in Latin America, the Caribbean and Africa. She holds a BA in peace studies from Whitworth University in Spokane, Washington, an MA in journalism from El Pais School of Journalism in Madrid, Spain, and an MA in cultural anthropology from here at WWU.

Tony Payan, Ph.D., is the fellow in Mexico Studies and director of the Mexico Center at Rice University’s Baker Institute. He is also an adjunct associate professor at Rice University, an associate professor of political science at the University of Texas at El Paso, and serves on the graduate faculty at the Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez. Payan’s research focuses on the applicability of international relations theory to the U.S.-Mexico border and other border environments. His work theorizes on various topics regarding international borders, including border governability, foreign policy attitudes on the border, and the manifestation of U.S. foreign policy at its borders. Payan’s publications include two single-authored books: “Cops, Soldiers and Diplomats: Understanding Agency Behavior in the War on Drugs” and “The Three U.S.-Mexico Border Wars: Drugs, Immigration and Homeland Security.” He has also co-edited four volumes: “Gobernabilidad e Ingobernabilidad en la Región Paso del Norte,” “Human Rights Along the U.S.-Mexico Border: Gendered Violence and Insecurity,” “De Soldaderas a Activistas: La mujer chihuahuense en los albores del Siglo XXI,” and “A War that Can’t Be Won: Binational Perspectives on the War on Drugs.” A more recent co-edited manuscript, “Comprehensive Immigration Reform After the 2012 Elections,” is currently under review at Springer Press, and he is working on a manuscript titled “The Bird’s Eye View: An Institutional Analysis of Mexico’s 2006-2012 Security Strategy.” He has authored numerous book chapters and academic articles and attended dozens of conferences and workshops in the United States, Mexico and other countries. Payan earned his B.A. in philosophy and classical languages (Greek and Latin) from the University of Dallas and his MBA from the University of Dallas Graduate School of Management. He received his doctorate degree in international relations from Georgetown University in 2001.

Dr Wendy Simonds is Professor of Sociology at Georgia State University. She is coauthor (with Barbara Katz Rothman and Bari Meltzer Norman) of Laboring On: Birth in Transition in the United States (Routledge, 2007), author of Abortion at Work: Ideology and Practice in a Feminist Clinic (Rutgers, 1996), and co-author (with Barbara Katz Rothman) of Centuries of Solace: Expressions of Maternal Grief in Popular Literature (Temple, 1992). She has also published articles about mifepristone abortion and emergency contraception. Simonds is co-editor of Sex Matters: The Sexuality and Society Reader, now in its fourth edition (Norton 2014). She is currently working on a book entitled Hospital Land USA: Sociological Adventures in Medicalization (Routledge, forthcoming 2015).

Harun Rashid, M.A. (University of Dhaka) and Ph.D. (University of Saskatchewan), is Emeritus Professor at the Department of Geography and Earth Science, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Prior to his appointment at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse as the department Chair (2004-2007), Dr Rashid served as the acting Associate Vice-President Research at Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada for nearly two and half years (2002-2004). Earlier he taught at Lakehead University (1975-2004), University of Benin, Nigeria (1981-1982), and University of Dhaka, Bangladesh (1965-1969). Dr Rashid has taught and published extensively on water resources management, floodplain management, natural hazards and disasters, applied fluvial geomorphology, and media discourse on flood problems and climate change. He received several external research grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), including its strategic Community-University Research Alliance (CURA) grant in 2001. In 2005, Lakehead University recognized Dr Rashid as one of its 40-years’ 40 research stars. He serves as a member of the editorial boards of three international journals, namely Disasters, Environmental Management, and The Arab World Geographer. Dr Rashid is the primary co-author of the recently published book (2014), entitled Climate Change in Bangladesh: Confronting Impending Disasters (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books).

Co-sponsors

Fairhaven College is grateful to our valued co-sponsors for the Spring 2014 World Issues Forum:

Anthropology, Canadian American Studies, WWU Diversity Fund, Women’s Studies.

 

Contact

Shirley Osterhaus is the Coordinator of the World Issues Forums:

shirley.osterhaus@wwu.edu
650-2309

Shirley's Faculty Profile >