Chemistry

Western's Chemistry programs provide close student-faculty contact and relatively small classes, direct access to modern laboratory equipment and instrumentation, and opportunities for cutting-edge research under the direction of a faculty advisor. 

Within the department, faculty are active in many research areas including biofuels, protein engineering, computer modeling, catalysis, nanomaterials, materials for solar cells, electrochemistry, polymers, thin films, protein structural analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray crystallography, and organic synthesis.

Western’s Chemistry Department is part of the College of Science and Engineering.

 

Catherine Miles
Chemistry Student

“My professors are as excited about chemistry as I am. They teach with such vigor that you can’t help getting excited. I believe I’m getting one of the best undergraduate educations possible.”

The Department of Chemistry, in addition to its core of fundamental studies in Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic and Physical chemistry, has added a variety of elective courses that offer diversity in training, study and research at the undergraduate level. Students are immersed in an environment emphasizing strong interdisciplinary scientific preparation, and receive hands-on experience with advanced chemical and biochemical methods.  

The Chemistry Department at Western Washington University is approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS), and students who complete the Bachelor of Science in the Chemistry program receive ACS certification of their degree.

 

Beyond the Classroom

Opportunities beyond classroom study are a cornerstone of the Chemistry Department. Undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to pursue faculty mentored research projects and to present the results of their research at a national conference or during Western’s annual Scholars Week. Undergraduate and graduate students often coauthor papers that are published in scientific literature. 

The department strives to offer a diverse and vibrant seminar program. Each year leading researchers, as well as faculty and graduate students from Western, present and discuss their cutting-edge research. 

Western Chemistry students might also be involved in the Chemistry Club (WEsTeRn Chem Club) – a Student Chapter of the American Chemical Society. The chapter provides students at Western with an opportunity to gain information on educational and professional opportunities and activates. Most importantly, the chapter gets students involved with fun social and service activities that help strengthen bonds among students and faculty.

Careers and Graduate Studies

Graduates have gone on to careers in medicine, aerospace, microelectronics, biotechnology, community college teaching, the energy sector, and many other fields.

Employers of recent Western graduates: 

  • Ecig Express: Lab Technician 
  • Pacific National Laboratories: Research Assistant 
  • Phillips 66: Lab Technician 
  • TOKU-E: Laboratory Technician 

Western graduates who pursue graduate studies are doing so at such schools as: 

  • University of California: Chemistry (PhD)
  • University of Chicago: Chemistry (PhD)
  • University of Illinois: Physical Chemistry (PhD)
  • University of Massachusetts: Chemistry (PhD)
  • University of Oregon: Chemistry (MS)
  • Western Washington University: Chemistry (MS) 

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Chemical/Pharmaceutical Sales 
  • Crime Lab Analyst 
  • High School Teacher 
  • Industrial Chemist 
  • Veterinarian 
  • Technical Writing 
  • Forensic Scientist 
  • Quality Assurance Specialist 
  • Research Scientist 
  • Physician 
  • Occupational Safety Specialist

 

Chemistry

Western's Chemistry programs provide close student-faculty contact and relatively small classes, direct access to modern laboratory equipment and instrumentation, and opportunities for cutting-edge research under the direction of a faculty advisor. Within the department, faculty are active in many research areas including biofuels, protein engineering, computer modeling, catalysis, nanomaterials, materials for solar cells, electrochemistry, polymers, thin films, protein structural analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray crystallography, and organic synthesis.

The Department of Chemistry, in addition to its core of fundamental studies in Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic and Physical chemistry, has added a variety of elective courses that offer diversity in training, study and research at the undergraduate level. 

Catherine Miles
Chemistry Student

“My professors are as excited about chemistry as I am. They teach with such vigor that you can’t help getting excited. I believe I’m getting one of the best undergraduate educations possible.”

Beyond the Classroom

Opportunities beyond classroom study are a cornerstone of the Chemistry Department. Undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to pursue faculty mentored research projects and to present the results of their research at a national conference or during Western’s annual Scholars Week. Undergraduate and graduate students often coauthor papers that are published in scientific literature. 

The department strives to offer a diverse and vibrant seminar program. Each year leading researchers, as well as faculty and graduate students from Western, present and discuss their cutting-edge research. 

Western Chemistry students might also be involved in the Chemistry Club (WEsTeRn Chem Club) – a Student Chapter of the American Chemical Society. The chapter provides students at Western with an opportunity to gain information on educational and professional opportunities and activates. Most importantly, the chapter gets students involved with fun social and service activities that help strengthen bonds among students and faculty. 

 

Careers and Graduate Studies

After graduation, our alumni have continued their education in chemistry graduate schools, medical schools, or other professional fields, and have successful careers in education, aerospace, microelectronics, biotechnology, and the energy and business sectors. The success of these graduates attests to the quality of our programs.

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Chemical/Pharmaceutical Sales
  • Crime Lab Analyst
  • High School Teacher
  • Industrial Chemist
  • Physician
  • Technical Writing
  • Forensic Scientist
  • Quality Assurance Specialist
  • Research Scientist
  • Occupational Safety Specialist
  • Science Laboratory Technician
  • Environmental Scientist/Consultant
  • Biotechnology Scientist
  • College Professor

 

Canadian-American Studies

Canada and the United States share a continent and are linked by deep economic ties, several common historical experiences, and many cultural similarities; they are also marked by real and important differences.

The Canadian-American Studies major helps students to understand and navigate these similarities and differences, preparing them to engage key cultural, environmental, and economic issues in North America today and in the future through three specializations:

  • Canadian-American Relations
  • Canadian Histories/Cultures/Identities
  • Francophone Canada

Additionally, students may design their own specialization in consultation with a faculty advisor.

Why Consider a Canadian-American Studies Major?

On its own, the major provides an excellent international and interdisciplinary course of study for students looking for a broad-based, liberal arts education. By drawing upon courses from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, the major explores key concepts and methods across multiple disciplines and applies them to complex problems in our shared regional and continental contexts.

Through identified specializations, the major is also designed to combine with other majors to add depth and international expertise. Examples include combining Canadian-American Studies’ specializations with: anthropology, economics, environmental policy and science, geography, history, international business, languages, or political science.

“For a Canadian-American Studies major, being 20 minutes from Canada has its advantages. The program is also customizable, which allowed me to take a variety of courses ranging from environmental studies to political science.” -Julia Barnes, student

Beyond the Classroom

Beyond the classroom, the Center and Club Canada offer opportunities for students to immerse themselves in Canadian culture by holding events such as hockey and broom ball games, regional food celebrations, film screenings, guest speakers and faculty talks, and field excursions to Vancouver, Whistler, and more.

The Center provides support and resources to students interested in participating in relevant internships, including opportunities with the Canadian Consulate in Seattle.

Careers and Graduate Studies

The Canadian-American Studies curriculum prepares students for careers related to art and literature, education and research, environmental policy, diplomacy, international business, international law, and politics. 

Recent Western graduates have found fulfilling careers working for the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, directing internet marketing for a Canada-US import/export firm, serving as a US federal government liaison to a municipality for emergency preparedness, working for Google in their map division, and coordinating border and emergency management programs for the cross-border Pacific Northwest Economic Region.

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Art and Literature
  • Education and Research
  • Environmental Policy
  • Diplomacy
  • International Business
  • International Law
  • Politics

Department of Canadian-American Studies

Business Administration—Operations Management Concentration

Western's Business Administration programs explore leadership roles in business and the community, providing students with the perceptual and analytical skills necessary  to make decisions and evaluate policies in business, and develop an understanding of the social, economic, and regulatory environments in business. All  students earning a degree in Business Administration develop significant understanding of  management information systems and computing.

Operations Management determines what equipment, labor, tools, facilities, materials, energy, and information are required, how these can best be obtained, and how they are used to satisfy the requirements of the market place. Operations managers are concerned with each step in providing a service or product — from acquisition of the raw materials and component parts to delivery to the customer. Operations managers are also responsible for critical activities such as quality management and control, capacity planning, materials management, purchasing, and scheduling.

The Operations Management program and Decision Sciences Department are part of the College of Business and Economics.

 

Beyond the Classroom

Most companies are looking for people with real world experience, which is why Western students receive encouragement and support in finding relevant internships. Student internships often provide valuable industry connections and can lead to a job offer after graduation. 

Students can also join Western's Chapter of APICS — the Association for Operations Management. APICS provides support and supplemental education to students, hosting weekly meetings and special events open to any that would like to attend. Club activities link the students' academic education to current developments within industry. Activities include: 

  • Industry professional speakers 
  • Professional development meetings
  • Facility tours
  • Simulation exercises
  • Career skill workshops

 

Careers and Graduate Studies

The Department of Decision Sciences opens the door to a variety of high-tech jobs. Graduates work for firms as analysts, finding flaws and creating a more efficient and streamlined approaches for their clients. Work settings can range from deep inside a datacenter server room to a system consultant overseeing production in a foreign country. 

Recent Student Internships: 

  • ChemPoint.com 
  • Fluke
  • Superfeet

Employers of Recent Western Graduates: 

  • B/E Aerospace: Buyer 
  • Boeing Defense, Space, and Security: Procurement Agent 
  • Cascade DAFO: Digital Modifier 
  • Eritrean Association of Greater Seattle: Community Relations Manager 
  • Fluke: Production Master Scheduler and OSP Scheduler
  • ING Financial Partners: Investment Advisor Representative
  • JB Hunt Transport Services, Inc.: Carrier Sales Coordinator
  • Pearl Izumi: Systems Process Administrator

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Production Supervisor 
  • Quality Control Specialist 
  • Inventory Control Specialist 
  • Administrator 
  • Operations Manager 
  • Buyer 
  • Supply Chain Consultant 
  • Logistics Manager

Department of Decision Sciences

Business Administration—Marketing Concentration

Western's Business Administration majors explore leadership roles in business and the community, providing students with the perceptual and analytical skills necessary  to make decisions and evaluate policies in business, and to develop understanding of the social, economic, and regulatory environments in business. All  students earning a degree in Business Administration develop significant understanding of  management information systems and computing.  

While many people think marketing is all about sales and advertising, that perception is far from what marketing encompasses. Marketing means satisfying the wants and needs of customers by building mutually beneficial relationships between organizations and customers. By creating value for customers, marketers help increase the value of organizations. Marketing tools and strategies are used in both for-profit business and non-profit organizations. 

The Marketing Concentration provides students with coursework that is intellectually stimulating and directly useful in today's marketing profession. Students study marketing as it relates to a variety of activities in: new product development, pricing strategies and implementation, various communications including traditional advertising, digital media, personal selling, distribution, management of services, and brand management.

Western’s Finance and Marketing Department is part of the College of Business and Economics.

 

"While doing my internship in Hollywood, I learned that communication and confidence are the key to success.  You are a brand and you must learn how to make yourself known.  A marketing degree definitely helps with that."

–Samantha Jones, Katalyst Films

Beyond the Classroom

Students are strongly encouraged to take as many relevant electives as possible, participate in extracurricular activities and, most importantly, find a marketing internship. These experiences provide students with valuable contacts and experiences that will be meaningful to prospective employers. 

The Student Marketing Association (SMA) is a group of students looking to develop and practice the marketing skills learned in a classroom setting. SMA hosts professional readiness workshops, speakers, mixers, and other networking opportunities.

Careers and Graduate Studies

A degree in Marketing opens doors to numerous career opportunities. Nearly every area of business is somehow related to marketing, which provides students with a well-versed set of experiences and knowledge. 

Employers of Recent Western Graduates: 

  • Amazon: Technical Account Manager
  • Bigfin.com: Digital Marketing Assistant
  • FSR Wealth Managment: Client Services and Office Manager
  • SEO Works: Digital Analyst
  • Zillow: Marketing Account Manager
  • Windermere Real Estate: Broker
  • Allen Partners, Inc.: Marketing Coordinator and Operations Assistant 
  • Art Gamblin Motors: Digital Media Specialist 
  • Below the Boat: Marketing Director
  • K2: Web Developer and Marketing
  • Pandora Internet Radio: Marketing Coordinator
  • Razorfish: Assistant Media Planner

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Business Administration—Management Information Systems Concentration

Western's Business Administration majors explore leadership roles in business and the community, providing students with the perceptual and analytical skills necessary  to make decisions and evaluate policies in business, and develop an understanding of the social, economic, and regulatory environments in business. All  students earning a degree in Business Administration develop significant understanding of  management information systems and computing.  

In the Management Information Systems Concentration students learn how information technology can contribute to an organization, and how to develop and apply information technology based business solutions. The concentration teaches students to combine their understanding of business, information systems and technology to help organizations compete more successfully by streamlining current operations. 

Western’s Decision Sciences Department is part of the College of Business and Economics, which prepares students for positions of leadership and  stewardship in management and administration sectors of complex organizations — from small  companies to large multinational enterprises. 

 

Beyond the Classroom

Most companies are looking for people with real world experience, which is why Western students receive encouragement and support in finding relevant internships. Student internships often provide valuable industry connections and can lead to a job offer after graduation. Other ways to network and gain extracurricular experience include:  

  • Study Abroad: Study business at institutions around the world through Western's study abroad program.
  • Management Information Systems Association: The MISA engages and educates current and future MIS students. MISA hosts industry professionals, visits companies and tours their facilities, has a virtual mentor program, and creates group events for networking purposes.

Careers and Graduate Studies

Management Information Systems opens the door to many high-tech jobs in this fast paced field. You may work in areas as diverse as managing networks, databases, IT projects, telecommunication systems, computer security systems, or websites. Your work setting can range from deep inside a datacenter to a system consultant overseeing projects in a foreign country. 

Employers of Recent Graduates: 

  • ATG Stores: .NET Web Applications Developer
  • Boeing: IS Analyst, IT, Programmer, Information Technology, Network Architect, Functional Analyst, IT Systems Analyst, and Programmer Analyst 
  • Costco: Accounting Report Analyst
  • Expedia: Web Analyst 
  • Holland America: Database Administrator 
  • Imprev: Systems Engineer 
  • Larson Gross PLLC: IT Assistant
  • Liberty Mutual: IT Analyst 
  • Microsoft: Associate Consultant
  • Northwest Business Technology Group: Technician  
  • Peace Corp: Assistant English Teacher/Computer Operations 
  • QuickPivot: Technical Consultant
  • Safeco: Quality Assurance IT Analyst 
  • Seattle Area Pipe Trades: IT Administrator 
  • SPIE: Software Engineer
  • Suddath Relocation Systems LLC: PC Technician
  • Starbucks: Contract Specialist 
  • Teleion Consulting: Associate Analyst
  • Trans Ocean Products: Application and Report Developer 
  • Western Washington University: Project Analyst

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Systems Analyst 
  • Computer Systems Manager 
  • Software Test Analyst 
  • Administrator 
  • Database Administrator
  • Software Developer
  • Business Analyst
  • Website Developer

 

Department of Decision Sciences

Business Administration—Management Concentration

Western's Business Administration programs explore leadership roles in business and the community, providing students with the perceptual and analytical skills necessary  to make decisions and evaluate policies in business, and develop an understanding of the social, economic, and regulatory environments in business. All  students earning a degree in Business Administration develop significant understanding of  management information systems and computing.  

The Management Concentration prepares students to work with people in a variety of contexts. While other business disciplines focus on tasks for business, Management focuses on how to motivate others to accomplish these tasks efficiently and effectively with high quality results. Coursework in Management enables students to develop the analytical skills necessary for effective decision-making and business policy development. Students learn how to manage projects, work with teams, implement changes, and be effective leaders. 

Western’s Management Department is part of the College of Business and Economics, which prepares students for positions of leadership and  stewardship in management and administration sectors of complex organizations — from small  companies to large multinational enterprises. 

In organizations today, managers provide the leadership, guidance, and motivation to achieve success. Coursework in Management enables you to develop the analytical skills necessary for effective decision-making and business policy development. In this program, you will develop your leadership abilities through a deeper understanding of social, cultural, economic, and regulatory environments as they pertain to business management.

Beyond the Classroom

Most companies are looking for people with real world experience, which is why Western students receive encouragement and support in finding relevant internships. Student internships often provide valuable industry connections and can lead to a job offer after graduation. Other ways to network and gain extracurricular experience include: 

  • Study Abroad: Study business at institutions around the world through Western's study abroad program.
  • International Business Club: Build networks between peers, graduates, and business professionals involved with the international community.

 

Careers and Graduate Studies

This program is designed for students with a variety of career goals, including opportunities with  financial institutions, manufacturing and retail firms, service industries, and the public sector. Employers of recent Western graduates include: 

  • ADP Cobalt: Order Specialist 
  • A/E Aerospace: Quality Technical Aide 
  • Royal Commercial Corporation: Commercial RE Broker Marketing Manager 
  • Sherwin Williams: Assistant Manager 
  • Transmedia Press, LLC: Team Manager

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Project Management 
  • Event Planning 
  • Management Consulting 
  • Nonprofit Management 
  • Government 
  • Small Business
  • Retail Management
  • Administration
  • Human Resource Management
  • Financial Management

 

Business Administration—International Business Concentration

Western's Business Administration majors explore leadership roles in business and the community, providing students with the perceptual and analytical skills necessary  to make decisions and evaluate policies in business, and develop an understanding of the social, economic, and regulatory environments in business. All  students earning a degree in Business Administration develop significant understanding of  management information systems and computing.  

As globalization persists, people who can conduct international business are vital to organizations now more than ever before. The International Business Concentration provides students with the skills global companies are seeking. Often combining training in language and in other business areas, student learn to manage business relationships across borders in a variety of capacities. Here are some comments from International Business alumni.

 

“The International Business program at Western engages and challenges its students to analyze and resolve real business problems that are relevant in today's globalized economy.”

–Sebastian Kohlmeier, International Business Alumni, WWU Presidential Scholar, Amazon and Microsoft Work Experience

 

Beyond the Classroom

Most companies are looking for managers with real world experience, which is why Western Washington University International Business students are encouraged to find experience outside the classroom that push them to expand and get experience in using their knowledge.

  • International Business Operations Projects Class — Seniors in the international business program can elect to take IBUS 473, International Trade Operations. This class allows groups of three students to work with local firms to research international opportunities. This successful class has completed more than 100 projects for local firms.
  • Study Abroad — Students in the international business program are strongly encouraged to study abroad. When possible, they should consider "direct exchanges," programs that let them study as a regular student at our university partners. This usually makes for a more meaningful learning experience and is substantially cheaper than other alternative ways to go abroad. Contact Dan.Lindeman@wwu.edu in the International Programs and Exchanges office for more information.
  • Internships — Internships with international content are sometimes available, and the International Business faculty alerts all students to these opportunities, leads often supplied by our alumni. Students are encouraged to use their own contacts and connections to find additional internship opportunities.

Other ways to network and gain extracurricular experience include: 

 

It took 10 years after I graduated with my International Business degree to finally make the move to an international company! During that time, I never lost sight of the goal to work and live internationally. I traveled (personally and professionally), learned languages, talked to people about my goal, made contacts and eventually it came together. Now I rely on the learnings from the International Business program, from managing relationships to competitive positioning, in my work every day. The program was a great foundation for my career in that it propelled me forward in positions within the US that allowed me to target opportunities for working abroad.

Allison Bilas (2003) Senior Manager Game Analytics, Movie Star Planet, Copenhagen Denmark

Careers and Graduate Studies

The International Business program is designed to provide graduates the ability to combine principles from their business training to handle complex problems that are faced in the international and domestic business environment.  This prepares our graduates for a variety of career paths. The most common jobs require students to manage the relationships between firms and organizations. This can include supply systems, trade flows and logistics, and marketing for foreign markets. The same skill set can be used in a variety of domestic markets as well. Our students can find domestic jobs with financial institutions, manufacturing and retail firms, service industries and the public sector. Graduates have access to an alumni network of more than 700 graduates, almost half of whom are linked to us via LINKEDIN groups that provide a network for job search.

The following list gives some examples of jobs held by our graduates.  For more, visit the International Business home page.

  • Boeing: Business Operations Manager in Spain, Procurement Agent and 787 Process Analyst
  • Amazon: Global Talent Search, Amazon Marketplace Relationship Manager and Senior Manager Kindle
  • Expeditors: Import Transportation Agent and Corporate Strategy Manager
  • Microsoft: Sales Excellence Program Manager
  • Tecplot: Strategic Alliance Manager
  • Starbucks: Coffee Supply Relationship Manager
  • Nintendo: Purchasing Manager
  • Liberty Mutual Insurance: Senior Business Analyst
  • Europa Foods Specialty Grocery: Owner
  • Brunswick Europe: Senior Marketing Manager
  • PACCAR: Business Development Project Manager
  • Expedia: SEO Specialist for Latin America

 

The new job in Brazil is challenging and interesting, although the current Brazil economic crisis hasn't made anything easy. I am working for a film production company that makes institutional and promotional videos for the corporate sector in Brazil. I work in business development. The international business program and its professors provided me the opportunities, training and inspiration to study and work in Latin America while learning two new languages in the process.

Brandon Behl (2013), San Paulo Brazil

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Import/Export Management 
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Management of International Relationships in Business
  • International Marketing
  • International Non-Profit 
  • Law
  • Public Policy
  • Analysis of International Competitiveness

Department of Management - International Business Program

Business Administration—General Business

The Business Administration-General Concentration is currently available to students at our Poulsbo campus and by permission only on Western's main campus.  For consideration on the Bellingham campus students can contact the Department of Management for details and will be required to have a completed Plan of Study listing preferred program elective courses.  Due to limited resources and capacity issues not all major restricted CBE courses will be available for Business Administration-General students.

Western's Business Administration majors explore leadership roles in business and the community, providing students with the perceptual and analytical skills necessary  to make decisions and evaluate policies in business, and develop an understanding of the social, economic, and regulatory environments in business. All  students earning a degree in Business Administration develop significant understanding of  management information systems and computing.  

The General Business Concentration allows students to customize their business courses to suit their own business education goals. Rather than concentrating in a specific business discipline such as Finance or Marketing, students may choose to create their own General Business Concentration with the help of faculty advisors. 

Western’s Department of Management is part of the College of Business and Economics, which prepares students for positions of leadership and  stewardship in management and administration sectors of complex organizations — from small  companies to large multinational enterprises. 

Beyond the Classroom

Most companies are looking for people with real world experience, which is why Western students receive encouragement and support in finding relevant internships. Student internships often provide valuable industry connections and can lead to a job offer after graduation. Other ways to network and gain extracurricular experience include:

  • Study Abroad: Study business at institutions around the world through Western's study abroad program.
  • International Business Club: Build networks between peers, graduates, and business professionals involved with the international community.

Careers and Graduate Studies

This program is designed for students with a variety of career goals, including opportunities with  financial institutions, manufacturing and retail firms, service industries, and the public sector. Employers of recent Western graduates include: 

  • Amazon: Area Manager and Merchant Debt Recovery Investigator
  • Enterprise Rent-A-Car: Management Trainee 
  • L’Oreal: Coordinator for Clarisonic International Business Development 
  • Travelex: Assistant Sales Manager 
  • Microsoft: Event Coordinator
  • REI: Customer Service Specialists

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Business Administration—Finance Concentration

Western's Business Administration majors explore leadership roles in business and the community, providing students with the perceptual and analytical skills necessary  to make decisions and evaluate policies in business, and develop an understanding of the social, economic, and regulatory environments in business. All  students earning a degree in Business Administration develop significant understanding of  management information systems and computing.  

The field of finance encompasses many different areas including investments, financial institutions, corporate finance, and real estate. The Finance Concentration includes coursework in each of these areas as well as courses in options and futures, multi-national finance and insurance. Managing finances requires you to answer intricate questions like: Can we afford to give employees a raise? Is it better to rent or buy office space? How should we finance our business? Typically, a student who pursues a concentration in finance is good with math, money, inherently a problem solver, and well organized.

The Department of Finance and Marketing is part of the College of Business and Economics.

 

"The internship programs at Western are a great way to get a heads up on the competition after graduation and I would recommend them to any student who is serious about pursuing a certain career path."

–John Peters, Merrill Lynch & Saturna Capital

Beyond the Classroom

Student internships or apprenticeships in finance are excellent for gaining practical experience in a professional, finance-related work setting. Internships help students apply the skills learned in class to real-life situations and give students valuable professional experience and mentoring. 

The Financial Management Association (FMA) assists in the professional, educational, and social development of college students interested in financial management, banking, real estate and investment management. It provides an association for college students actively interested in these fields, and encourages interaction between business executives, faculty, and students interested in finance, economics, and accounting. FMA events include:

  • Guest speakers
  • Investment management experience 
  • Resume building
  • Career information and internships
  • Networking with potential employers
  • Club outings
  • Affiliation with the nationally-recognized  FMA International
  • FMA website (jobs, conferences,  finance certifications, and forecast competitions)
  • Membership in the FMA National Honor Society 

Careers and Graduate Studies

A graduate with a concentration in Finance may work as a financial securities or loan officer analyst, business financial manager, portfolio manager, financial planner, or stockbroker. 

Employers of Recent Western Graduates: 

  • Bank of New York Mellon: Senior Performance Analyst
  • Martin Nelson and Company, Inc.: Investment Advisor
  • Molina Healthcare: Healthcare Analyst
  • City of Seward: Accounting Tech
  • Adobe Systems: Tester 
  • Bank of America: Teller 
  • Bentall Kennedy: Property Assistant 
  • Chrono Wealth Capital: Financial Analyst 
  • Curnow and Curnow: Administrative Assistant 
  • Golin Harris: Billing Coordinator/Financial Administrator 
  • KeyBank: Management Associate 
  • Mutual of Omaha: Financial Services Representative 
  • Seattle Mariners Baseball Club: Finance Intern 
  • WA State Auditor’s Office: Assistant State Auditor 
  • WA State Department of Financial Institutions: Financial Examiner 
  • WA State Department of Revenue 
  • Wells Fargo Home Mortgage: Home Mortgage Consultant

 

Requirements and Course Details

To learn more about this program, including grade requirements, a course listing, how to declare the major, and more, see the Program of Study Details.

 

Sample Careers

  • Mutual Fund Manager
  • Chief Financial Officer
  • Investment Banker
  • Financial Planner
  • Claims Adjuster/Examiner
  • Actuary
  • Financial Analyst
  • Appraiser
  • Loan Officer
  • Business Financial Manager
  • Portfolio Manager
  • Stock Broker

Department of Finance and Marketing

Pages

Subscribe to Western Washington University RSS